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hpracing10

What Size Tire Will Fit?

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On my 2003 silverado halfton Z71 I currently am running 265/75R16 size tires. Knowing nothing about tire sizes, I want to go up like one size, what size would that be? Just want to give the truck a little "beefier" look.

 

Also, WILL a bigger size tire even fit? I don't have a lift or anything like that and I don't plan on it, just wanted a little bigger tire than what I have on now, which I believe is the stock size.

 

One more thing, will a bigger tire affect my MPH or anything like that? Didn't know if a larger diameter tire will make the speedometer read any differently. Thanks for your replies.

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On my '01 Silverado I ran 285/75/16's. I did have the torsion bars cranked though to level it out. The 285/75's filled out the truck nice and gave it a good height. It threw my Speedometer off about 3 MPH I do believe so not a real big deal.

 

I think these trucks look 100% better with a size bigger tire. Makes it look like a truck!

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I have 285/75/16s also. no rubbing issues w/ the torsion bar cranked up. my speedometer is off like 3 mph like, like he said

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Can I get by without cranking the torsion bars? I have heard horror stories about guys doing that and having serious issues with their CV joints.

 

Thanks for your input

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Yes you can get by without cranking the t-bars. I ran 285/75/16 Firestone Destination A/T's without any rubbing issues WITHOUT cranking the t-bars. Ran that for over 1 year.

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Keep in mind that by putting larger tires on, you are effectively lowering your differential gear ratio (meaning taller gears), which will adversely affect both the acceleration and towing performance.

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Towing and acceleration performance will all depends on what size tire he goes up to. If he goes from a 265 up to a 305 or even a 315, there will be a noticeable loss in performance. But a one size jump up to a 285, he probably will not notice that. I had 83,000 miles on my 03 before I traded it in last Monday. Spend the last 22K (or so) miles with the 285's on it. Didn't notice any performance decrease, only a fuel consumption increase by 1 mpg.

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Thanks for all the responses. I am not sure what to do yet, I really don't want to have to touch the torsion bars and I want to be sure the tires will fit before i go spending 700+ on them as I am on a college budget. The bigger, beefier tire would be nice and give a little taller stance I would imagine. Mainly I am going for looks. I do some towing in the summer, and I also have quite a bit of snow to contend with in the coming months where I live. Just wanted something to give the truck a more rugged look as it is basically stock right now, with a few extras like nerf bars, a toolbox and other small mods. I will be due for a new set of tread after this winter and I appreciate all of your input and advice.

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Keep in mind that by putting larger tires on, you are effectively lowering your differential gear ratio (meaning taller gears), which will adversely affect both the acceleration and towing performance.

 

Very sage words above.

Listen to and abide by them.

Save yourself the grief.

In other words, KISS or (Keep it Stock Stupid) :lol:

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Contrary to popular belief, increasing tire diameter won't just change the effective gear ratio to a lower numerical number. That in itself would, in many instances, increase fuel economy. But larger diameter tires will require more horsepower to turn them. It's not the weight or the width, rolling resistance, etc that is the biggest effect. It's the increased diameter the requires more force to rotate to accelerate the same weight vehicle.

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also keep in mind that the 265, 285, 305, 315, etc is not the height or diameter of the tire, it is the tread width in mm. The aspect ratio (second #) like 75, 70, 65, etc is the sidewall height as a percentage to the width.

 

So you can go to a 285/70/16 and they will be wider, but will be the same diameter (height) and have the same revolutions per mile as a 265/75/16 so the speedo will register the same etc

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A friend jumped up 1 tire size on his 96 chevy like you are looking to do and his fuel consumption went up drastically! Especially bad when towing.

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also keep in mind that the 265, 285, 305, 315, etc is not the height or diameter of the tire, it is the tread width in mm. The aspect ratio (second #) like 75, 70, 65, etc is the sidewall height as a percentage to the width.

 

So you can go to a 285/70/16 and they will be wider, but will be the same diameter (height) and have the same revolutions per mile as a 265/75/16 so the speedo will register the same etc

 

 

Just a small correction to your post, but the first number is the "section width" which is across the widest point on the sidewall.

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Just a small correction to your post, but the first number is the "section width" which is across the widest point on the sidewall.

 

 

I know that, but most peeps may not know what section width is so I just used tread width. Easier to understand

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I am actually considering replacing the stock 265-70/17 tires on my truck with 265-60/17s when time comes to get better acceleration. It will drop the truck height by only about 1.3 inches. It should effectively give me about 3.90 gear ratio, up from the present 3.73.

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