Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • 0
MDelgado

Oil Coming Out Of Dip Stick Tube?

Question

Hello, I have a 02 Tahoe with a 5.3L flex fuel, which I recently supercharged. It has a K&N FIPK and flowmaster catback. I was recently testing the install, when I noticed a burning smell. Whe I opened the hood, come to find out the dipstick was 3" out of the tube and it looks as though oil shot out, hit the hood, and went all over the engine and headers (making the burning smell). It got me thinking, how does the crank case pressure release? My old tahoe with a 5.7 had a breather tube on the valve covers, but the 5.3 doesn't. Is it possible the pressure inside the engine built so much that it shot out the dip stick tube???

 

1263220626.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

0 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

Not 100 percent sure but check your PCV valve. Positive crankcase ventilation. I believe its on the drivers side valve cover. Just pull it out and shake it to make sure the ball inside is free and not stuck. Give it a good cleaning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not 100 percent sure but check your PCV valve. Positive crankcase ventilation. I believe its on the drivers side valve cover. Just pull it out and shake it to make sure the ball inside is free and not stuck. Give it a good cleaning.

 

Thanks, I'll give that a shot. On my first go around I didn't see a pcv, but I was also freezing and rushing my inspection since it was 11 degrees lastnight..... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like your pressurizing the crank case...I'm gonna say +1 on the PCV Idea.

 

You may have to put a BOV on the intake piping to vent pressure when you get off the gas though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello, I have a 02 Tahoe with a 5.3L flex fuel, which I recently supercharged. It has a K&N FIPK and flowmaster catback. I was recently testing the install, when I noticed a burning smell. Whe I opened the hood, come to find out the dipstick was 3" out of the tube and it looks as though oil shot out, hit the hood, and went all over the engine and headers (making the burning smell). It got me thinking, how does the crank case pressure release? My old tahoe with a 5.7 had a breather tube on the valve covers, but the 5.3 doesn't. Is it possible the pressure inside the engine built so much that it shot out the dip stick tube???

 

It definitely sounds like the crankcase is being over pressurized.

 

How much boost is being produced?

 

Worn rings?

 

Call the blower manufacturer's tech line see what they say.

 

 

Not 100 percent sure but check your PCV valve. Positive crankcase ventilation. I believe its on the drivers side valve cover. Just pull it out and shake it to make sure the ball inside is free and not stuck. Give it a good cleaning.

 

Pretty sure the pcv uses a fixed orifice, no check ball.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello, I have a 02 Tahoe with a 5.3L flex fuel, which I recently supercharged. It has a K&N FIPK and flowmaster catback. I was recently testing the install, when I noticed a burning smell. Whe I opened the hood, come to find out the dipstick was 3" out of the tube and it looks as though oil shot out, hit the hood, and went all over the engine and headers (making the burning smell). It got me thinking, how does the crank case pressure release? My old tahoe with a 5.7 had a breather tube on the valve covers, but the 5.3 doesn't. Is it possible the pressure inside the engine built so much that it shot out the dip stick tube???

 

It definitely sounds like the crankcase is being over pressurized.

 

How much boost is being produced?

 

Worn rings?

 

Call the blower manufacturer's tech line see what they say.

 

 

Not 100 percent sure but check your PCV valve. Positive crankcase ventilation. I believe its on the drivers side valve cover. Just pull it out and shake it to make sure the ball inside is free and not stuck. Give it a good cleaning.

 

Pretty sure the pcv uses a fixed orifice, no check ball.

 

Yeah I wasn't sure if the 02 had fixed orifice, or not. So if there is no check ball....does that mean it just permanently vents the Crank case....because boost would go in there all the time. The addition of a check valve would aid this....Am I thinking right here...

 

Rings are easy to check...just do a compression check. 190-210 I believe is excellent...160-190 is good, and below 160 is bad, for these engines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It does not say how much you paid for it lol.

 

Oh, I thought it did, sorry, it was an Ebay auction I won for $1200

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello, I have a 02 Tahoe with a 5.3L flex fuel, which I recently supercharged. It has a K&N FIPK and flowmaster catback. I was recently testing the install, when I noticed a burning smell. Whe I opened the hood, come to find out the dipstick was 3" out of the tube and it looks as though oil shot out, hit the hood, and went all over the engine and headers (making the burning smell). It got me thinking, how does the crank case pressure release? My old tahoe with a 5.7 had a breather tube on the valve covers, but the 5.3 doesn't. Is it possible the pressure inside the engine built so much that it shot out the dip stick tube???

 

It definitely sounds like the crankcase is being over pressurized.

 

How much boost is being produced?

 

Worn rings?

 

Call the blower manufacturer's tech line see what they say.

 

 

Not 100 percent sure but check your PCV valve. Positive crankcase ventilation. I believe its on the drivers side valve cover. Just pull it out and shake it to make sure the ball inside is free and not stuck. Give it a good cleaning.

 

Pretty sure the pcv uses a fixed orifice, no check ball.

 

Yeah I wasn't sure if the 02 had fixed orifice, or not. So if there is no check ball....does that mean it just permanently vents the Crank case....because boost would go in there all the time. The addition of a check valve would aid this....Am I thinking right here...

 

Rings are easy to check...just do a compression check. 190-210 I believe is excellent...160-190 is good, and below 160 is bad, for these engines.

 

 

Thanks Aiden and Ron, it does sound like I have too much crank case pressure. The Rings should be fine, it only has 60k on her and runs real smooth. I haven't done a comp test on it though. The pump is 'supposed' to put out 6psi, but from what I read, these are exagerated figures. And I can't call Powerdyne, long story but they got bought out and the current Co. doesn't support the product anymore.

 

When you mention a BOV, is the below left image what you're talking about? It links the intake and exhaust side of the blower pump. I didn't install this and wonder if I should.

 

The kit also included breather tubes, but didn't say where to install them??

 

untitled-1.jpg

 

 

and this is all it says about a breather tube (edit) I'll type it blow in case you can't read the pic

 

Step 2. Disconnect hose from passenger side valve cover to throttle body and remove it. Re-move air filter gauge and grommet in air filter housing. Install supplied grommet and straight fitting in air filter housing. Connect supplied vac¬uum hose from the valve cover to the air box. Install cap and tiewrap the port on the throttle body. Refer to figure 2 and 2a.

 

 

untitled3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah install that tube between intake and "exhaust" side of the blower, thats your Bypass. It vents pressure in the charge pipe to the other side of the blower when the throttle plate slams shut...ie; when you are gassing it and you pull your foot off fast.

 

A BOV is what you hear on turbo cars...and can be used on S/C vehicles too...its the Pssssttttt you hear when a turboed vehicle shifts gears.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah install that tube between intake and "exhaust" side of the blower, thats your Bypass. It vents pressure in the charge pipe to the other side of the blower when the throttle plate slams shut...ie; when you are gassing it and you pull your foot off fast.

 

A BOV is what you hear on turbo cars...and can be used on S/C vehicles too...its the Pssssttttt you hear when a turboed vehicle shifts gears.

 

Alright, I'll install that, it makes sense now. Also, now that I read this over and over how 'the breather tube is connected to the throttle body' that must mean the SC is pressurizing the engine through BOTH the throttle body and through the breather tube if there's not a checkvalve in the breather assembly, right???

 

Aiden, do you know where I 'T' that vacuum line into? It's a rats nest under there and the direction don't specify

 

 

1263220618.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would "T" into something coming directly out of the manifold, thats where your guaranteed to get full manifold pressure/vacuum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would "T" into something coming directly out of the manifold, thats where your guaranteed to get full manifold pressure/vacuum

 

Alright, I foung the crank case vent it was hidden under the fuel rail. So I capped the fitting on the throttle body and ran the hose to the intake side of the pump.

 

I was looking for a good 5/32" vacuum line to T off, but they are all the hard plastic lines. The only rubber line was to the brake booster and that was a 1/2" line. Do I just have to cut the plastic line and use a heat gun to install a barbed fitting onto it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Popular Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.