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i have replaced all of my calipers and rotors and bleed the brakes a ton, but they are still very soft, any ideas? i wasn't sure how to test the master or boost. 1500 2003 silverado lt

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What kind of braake pads do you have on it?

 

Some of the aftermarket pads feel like sponges.

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What kind of braake pads do you have on it?

 

Some of the aftermarket pads feel like sponges.

 

Agreed, I put some crappy pads on once, and they felt like sponges. I replaced with HD pads and everything was back to normal :) Can you give more info. Why did you change calipers AND rotors and did you change the pads too?

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i have replaced all of my calipers and rotors and bleed the brakes a ton, but they are still very soft, any ideas? i wasn't sure how to test the master or boost. 1500 2003 silverado lt

 

There may be a special bleed procedure for the ABS mobule that requires a programmer be hooked up in order to cycle the module to different positions to eliminate all the air. Not sure on this one, but my buddy had a similar experience.

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i have replaced all of my calipers and rotors and bleed the brakes a ton, but they are still very soft, any ideas? i wasn't sure how to test the master or boost. 1500 2003 silverado lt

 

Why did you replace calipers?? What was the problem to start with?

 

Yes, their is a special procedure to bleed the ABS module. If you allowed the brake fluid to run dry back to the module it will have to be bleed.

 

A bad brake hose will cause spongy pedal problems as well as sticking calipers and uneven brake pad wear.

 

Also, what was your method to the madness of bleeding the brakes?

 

Jbo

 

edit: I use two types of brake pads ONLY. NAPA Premium Pads (AE OR CMX) OR OE. I have never created a spongy pedal with a set of brake pads (not to say its not possible but I never have). My money is on a brake hose!!

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im not sure what pads im using, medium grade from napa i think, and i replaced the rotors because they were thinning out, and then the 2 of the calipers were frozen and then 1 caliper striped its threads inside. i have only done 3 now that i think of it. they way i was bleeding the brakes was push on the pedal release the air screw and tighten then release the pedal

 

but my brakes are really soft and its hard to stop with a boat hooked up, i have to down shift the truck to help

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im not sure what pads im using, medium grade from napa i think, and i replaced the rotors because they were thinning out, and then the 2 of the calipers were frozen and then 1 caliper striped its threads inside. i have only done 3 now that i think of it. they way i was bleeding the brakes was push on the pedal release the air screw and tighten then release the pedal

 

but my brakes are really soft and its hard to stop with a boat hooked up, i have to down shift the truck to help

 

The front 2 calipers were stuck? Bleeding procedure is good as long as you have a hose on the bleeder screw and the other end of the hose submersed in brake fluid.

 

Jbo

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Ceramic pads will improve the feel a bit (as long as there is no air in the system). GM trucks all have a slightly mushy pedal (but great brakes). It's a characteristic of the trucks. I'm sure you know the difference between normal and too soft since it is your truck.

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Like I said earlier, you need to look into the special procedure for bleeding the system with ABS (assuming you have them) or you will never get the pedal feel back.

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Like I said earlier, you need to look into the special procedure for bleeding the system with ABS (assuming you have them) or you will never get the pedal feel back.

 

I agree. The ABS needs to be bled correctly to function right. Below is the procedure for a 2000 Silverado which is probably similar to yours. You'll notice it uses a scan tool as part of the procedure. That would be a Tech 2 or maybe a Snap On scan tool.

 

Important:

 

 

 

  • Use the two-person bleed procedure under the following conditions:

     

  • Installing a new Electro-Hydraulic Control Unit (EHCU) or new Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) .

     

  • Air is trapped in the valve body

     

  • Do not drive the vehicle until the brake pedal feels firm.

     

  • Do not reuse brake fluid that is used during bleeding.

     

  • Use the vacuum, the pressure and the gravity bleeding procedures only for base brake bleeding.

     

Two Person Procedure

 

 

 

 

  1. Raise the vehicle in order to access the system bleed screws.

     

  2. Bleed the system at the right rear wheel first.

     

  3. Install a clear hose on the bleed screw.

     

  4. Immerse the opposite end of the hose into a container partially filled with clean DOT 3 brake fluid.

     

  5. Open the bleed screw 1/2 to one full turn.

     

  6. Slowly depress the brake pedal. While the pedal is depressed to its full extent, tighten the bleed screw.

     

  7. Release the brake pedal and wait 10 - 15 seconds for the master cylinder pistons to return to the home position.

     

  8. Repeat the previous steps for the remaining wheels. The brake fluid which is present at each bleed screw, should be clean and free of air.

     

  9. This procedure may use more than a pint of fluid per wheel. Check the master cylinder fluid level every four to six strokes of the brake pedal in order to avoid running the system dry.

     

  10. Press the brake pedal firmly and run the Scan Tool Automated Bleed procedure (all except diesels above 15,000 GVW) once, or run the Function Test (diesels above 15,000 GVW) four times. Release the brake pedal between each test.

     

  11. Bleed all four wheels again using Steps 3 - 9. This will remove the remaining air from the brake system.

     

  12. Evaluate the feel of the brake pedal before attempting to drive the vehicle.

     

  13. Bleed the system as many times as necessary in order to obtain the appropriate feel of the pedal.

     

 

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Like I said earlier, you need to look into the special procedure for bleeding the system with ABS (assuming you have them) or you will never get the pedal feel back.

 

I agree. The ABS needs to be bled correctly to function right. Below is the procedure for a 2000 Silverado which is probably similar to yours. You'll notice it uses a scan tool as part of the procedure. That would be a Tech 2 or maybe a Snap On scan tool.

 

Important:

 

 

 

  • Use the two-person bleed procedure under the following conditions:

     

  • Installing a new Electro-Hydraulic Control Unit (EHCU) or new Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) .

     

  • Air is trapped in the valve body

     

  • Do not drive the vehicle until the brake pedal feels firm.

     

  • Do not reuse brake fluid that is used during bleeding.

     

  • Use the vacuum, the pressure and the gravity bleeding procedures only for base brake bleeding.

     

Two Person Procedure

 

 

 

 

  1. Raise the vehicle in order to access the system bleed screws.

     

  2. Bleed the system at the right rear wheel first.

     

  3. Install a clear hose on the bleed screw.

     

  4. Immerse the opposite end of the hose into a container partially filled with clean DOT 3 brake fluid.

     

  5. Open the bleed screw 1/2 to one full turn.

     

  6. Slowly depress the brake pedal. While the pedal is depressed to its full extent, tighten the bleed screw.

     

  7. Release the brake pedal and wait 10 - 15 seconds for the master cylinder pistons to return to the home position.

     

  8. Repeat the previous steps for the remaining wheels. The brake fluid which is present at each bleed screw, should be clean and free of air.

     

  9. This procedure may use more than a pint of fluid per wheel. Check the master cylinder fluid level every four to six strokes of the brake pedal in order to avoid running the system dry.

     

  10. Press the brake pedal firmly and run the Scan Tool Automated Bleed procedure (all except diesels above 15,000 GVW) once, or run the Function Test (diesels above 15,000 GVW) four times. Release the brake pedal between each test.

     

  11. Bleed all four wheels again using Steps 3 - 9. This will remove the remaining air from the brake system.

     

  12. Evaluate the feel of the brake pedal before attempting to drive the vehicle.

     

  13. Bleed the system as many times as necessary in order to obtain the appropriate feel of the pedal.

     

 

 

 

Kudos this is a good rendition of the proper brake bleed, but allow me to add: Right Rear, Left Rear, Right Front, Left Front as an order for the bleed sequence (that will get you bleeding the longest line to the shortest line). The Genisys scan tool will do this as well as the Pegisys. The scan tool bleed of the brake module should not be required for a caliper change. Just a 4 corner bleed. However, I could see having to bleed it if you have sucked air around in the system by an improper bleed procedure being done.

 

Just an after thought. The brake bleeder screw on each caliper is the at HIGHEST POINT right?????? Not pointing down....... They should all point up^.. ON every wheel. I have seen this happen a couple times... Customer walks in my store I sell person A 2 calipers. Later person A come back complaining of spongy pedal only to discover when I go to look L and R have been reversed on installation.

 

By the way the Blue Box at NAPA is the Safety Stop Pads (Middle Grade pads) they are Ceramics for this application. These are very quite pads and have a good service life too boot.

 

Jbo

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