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rikoseth

Method To Bleed Brakes- Myth Or Just Stupid?:)

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My uncle told me that you could leave the top off of the brake fluid resevoir overnight, and the lines would bleed themselves. The air bubbles would rise and clear out. I laughed a little, but wondered if its possible? Or, just something stupid someone assumed. Any thoughts/experiences?

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Nope, doesn't work that way. If there's air in the system you need to get it out by pushing it out 1 way or another. There will be air in the calipers/wheel cylinders if there's air in the system, then there's probably air in the ABS unit as well which needs to be activated to get it out.

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Nope, doesn't work that way. If there's air in the system you need to get it out by pushing it out 1 way or another. There will be air in the calipers/wheel cylinders if there's air in the system, then there's probably air in the ABS unit as well which needs to be activated to get it out.

 

 

Yeah, that just makes sense. I didn't think it would be that easy, or else we would all leave it over night! :dunno:

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My uncle told me that you could leave the top off of the brake fluid resevoir overnight, and the lines would bleed themselves. The air bubbles would rise and clear out. I laughed a little, but wondered if its possible? Or, just something stupid someone assumed. Any thoughts/experiences?

 

Sounds like he is having a little fun with you.lol I bet him and his friends will get a chuckle out of that!

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Hold up folks. Back in the good old days before ABS, you could actually gravity bleed the brakes. I have done it myself.

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I gravity bled my rear brakes (drums) when I swapped the rear end (and put in new wheel cylinders). I had fluid running out pretty good. Just opened the bleed screws (one at a time) and watched. I just made sure the reservoir never ran down too far. Then, just to make sure, I pushed the peddle 4 times for each side. My friend said that fluid was coming out in a steady stream. Then again, I don't think I have ABS in the rear, only the fronts I think.

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I've seen those used on TV shows. They are really nice, but who wants to pay $50-100 bucks for something they only need to do like once every 5 years or whatever. Its cheaper just to find a buddy to help you. Its kind of like someone owning a personal coolant system flusher.

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I change the brake fluid every two years on my Porsche so it is worth it for me. You can change the brake fluid or bleed the brakes by yourself with the motive bleeder. I also loan it out to friends.

 

As for flushing the coolant, I borrow a pressure tester from autozone and use it to bleed the coolant.

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yeah, I think my uncle is thinking back in the day before abs and such, where gravity bleeding may have been possible. But, admittedly, I tried it for the heck of it. Hahaha... I left it open over night, no difference. I guess I was just snipe hunting. LOL

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Gravity bleed is different than just letting the bubbles float up.

 

I bought a Motive bleeder when I did my brakes. Loved it, quick, easy to use, didn't need a second person.

Edited by brims

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Gravity bleed is different than just letting the bubbles float up.

 

I bought a Motive bleeder when I did my brakes. Loved it, quick, easy to use, didn't need a second person.

 

Right. Gravity bleeding would be a tottally different beast. What strange force would be forcing the air up thru the resevoir??

Edited by Rampage1

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I'm not sure about ABS but remember you should always start with the shortest brake line first. Then work your way down the line to the longest.

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I'm not sure about ABS but remember you should always start with the shortest brake line first. Then work your way down the line to the longest.

 

 

Other way around.

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I gravity bled my rear brakes (drums) when I swapped the rear end (and put in new wheel cylinders). I had fluid running out pretty good. Just opened the bleed screws (one at a time) and watched. I just made sure the reservoir never ran down too far. Then, just to make sure, I pushed the peddle 4 times for each side. My friend said that fluid was coming out in a steady stream. Then again, I don't think I have ABS in the rear, only the fronts I think.

 

 

I gravity bleed just about everything anymore, unless there are special circumstances. I can usually open what needs to be bleed up and work on something else for a while, topping off the master every so often. It does the work in a half hour in most cases and I don't need to use someone elses time. I finish up by bleeding each wheel the normal way a few times just to be sure the stream is good. It always is but I still do it just in case.

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