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roperninja

Pulling Pitman And Idler Arm

Question

So its my first time doing this job but it seems simple enough. But I am having a problem removing them from the rod that they attach to. I cant seem to pop them off the shaft with a pickel fork or anything.... Any chevy tricks I am missing?

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A puller does wonders

 

pa80.jpg

 

Used carfully, a 2-jaw puller will work as well.

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+1 million. You'll need a puller to pop it loose... then it will practically fall off.

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31VyX9Ia8IL._SL500_AA300_.jpgThis is the type I have and use.

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Take the nut off. Then put it back on just a few turns to protect the threads, then give the knuckle a good wack with a hammer.

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he's talking about the center link, not the spindle.

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Works on tie rod ends also.

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yes, that method works great for dislodging tie rod ends. the OP is trying to get the center link off the idler and pitman arms... not the tie rod/knuckle.

 

are you saying that you hit the knuckle with a hammer to dislodge the center link from the idler or pitman arm?

if so, ive never seen that technique used successfully on siezed idler and pitman joints....

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This.

 

Id really like to know some ancient trick to this im sure some fella has one.

yes, that method works great for dislodging tie rod ends. the OP is trying to get the center link off the idler and pitman arms... not the tie rod/knuckle.

 

are you saying that you hit the knuckle with a hammer to dislodge the center link from the idler or pitman arm?

if so, ive never seen that technique used successfully on siezed idler and pitman joints....

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andrew... about $25 at an auto parts store will be money well spent. If a pickle fork isnt doing the trick then you either need a bigger hammer, stronger arms, or get a puller.

 

...especially for the pitman arm. the $25 spent for the puller will pay for itself by not damaging the steering box & seals. just my $.02

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OR if you have the centerlink off of the truck and are just trying to pop the idler and pitman arms off of it, you can use an air chissel with the blunt tip on it. support the center link, put the nut on the pitman arm threads a few turns and then give it a few hits with the air chissel... should pop right off.

 

some guys will do this with it attached on the truck still but i was always concerned with damaging the steering box.

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I did this job on my '93 K1500 about 2 months ago and lemme tell you...first of all the puller wasn't too bad...i had to go to about 3 different parts stores to find out that the biggest fork they made was too small to fit the other side of the pitman arm. Easy fix we found was to use a hand grinder to make it wide enough...10 minutes later with a 10 pound sledge and very tired arms that thing finally came off...good luck dude

 

 

 

andrew... about $25 at an auto parts store will be money well spent. If a pickle fork isnt doing the trick then you either need a bigger hammer, stronger arms, or get a puller.

 

...especially for the pitman arm. the $25 spent for the puller will pay for itself by not damaging the steering box & seals. just my $.02

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I used the puller for both the idler arm and pitman arm, the pickle fort was useless for me. I used my impact wrench on this and throttled down until that SOB came off.

 

I'll echo richface109, "good luck dude!"

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The method I always used for taper joints was to give the spot on the arm where the tapered joint is. Hard to describe, so I will use another joint for an example. For example, look at the spindle, and look where the tie rod end attaches. To free it from the spindle, loosen the nut from the tie rod end almost completely removing it, then with the largest ball peen hammer you have, strike the spindle as hard as you can, at the point where the tie rod end passes through it. The logic is that you distort the taper slightly, and the tie rod end will drop out. Now apply that description to what ever tapered joint you are trying to free. I just used the outer tie rod end for simplicity.

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The method I always used for taper joints was to give the spot on the arm where the tapered joint is. Hard to describe, so I will use another joint for an example. For example, look at the spindle, and look where the tie rod end attaches. To free it from the spindle, loosen the nut from the tie rod end almost completely removing it, then with the largest ball peen hammer you have, strike the spindle as hard as you can, at the point where the tie rod end passes through it. The logic is that you distort the taper slightly, and the tie rod end will drop out. Now apply that description to what ever tapered joint you are trying to free. I just used the outer tie rod end for simplicity.

 

 

On a pitman arm you always and I am going to repeat ALWAYS use a puller. If you start beating with a hammer you are going to damage the bearings. Tie rod end and idle arm is not a problem using a hammer. But any time bearing are involved never use a hammer.

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