Jump to content

Sierra 5.3

First home under contract

Recommended Posts

As to hiring professionals to do things...make sure you investigate them thoroughly. I’ve been burned by a couple that had great reviews online. Don’t be afraid to call 3-4 of their past clients and go see their work. Make sure every single detail is in the contract and don’t give any more $$ up front than you’re willing to lose. There are a ton of great, fair, skilled contractors out there, but a lot of guys that are not. That’s been my biggest fail in home ownership. Hard learned lessons. 

 

Edit: use yout inspection to negotiate, even small items in need of repair can help shave a few bucks off.

Edited by StillOffshore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree, don't get in over your head with DIY projects.

You tube, google can be great to help if you decide you want to try to do them.

The key is having the right tools for the job.

Rent them.

I'm a retired construction worker.

Ended my career as a handy man. 

Done it all, roofs to plumbing.

Started as a  painter, then would ask the other tradesmen on jobs if I could help so I could learn.

I had my own small business also until I got burned out. Lots of hours to do it right.

 

To my point.

Get a minimum of 3 bids for all work.

As mentioned, check the contractors out thoroughly. Google can help.

Get some education about the work you're paying to have done so you know what to expect. Google again.

As far as money, I wouldn't pay any up front.

Never pay the full amount of the contract until you're happy with the work.

A remaining balance is a good tool to get thing fixed if need be.

Never pay more than 60% of the contract. Leave a 40% balance. 

Let the contractor prove he can do the job first.

Always ask how long to get the job done.

Make sure there is a signed contract with a completion date.

If they ask for material money up front, I would pass on the contractor.

Always watch the work performed on a daily basis.

Ask questions about things you don't understand.

I would make a point of being home in the morning when the crews show up and home before they leave.

You can track progress, quality and meet the workers to build a rapport with them. Can't hurt.

You can also see if they show up hung over, tired, or just poor condition to work.

I encouraged my customers to be home in the morning and home before I left.

This allowed for good P.R. and if any questions or issues arose the best way to handle them is face to face, not on the phone.

 

These are my opinions.

Good Luck

:happysad:

 

Edited by diyer2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Donstar said:

Enjoy your new home!   There will always be work to be done so budget your money and time carefully.  Know the limits of your own capabilities. Don't believe everything is a DIY project.  Hiring a professional tradesperson can save you a lot of aggravation, time, personal safety and sometimes money!  Finish one project before starting on the next or else you'll always feel that your living in a construction zone.  It is very hard to come home and relax after a tough day at work with a bunch more work in your face.  Home renovations can be a nice escape from your regular work, but it is still nice to have a break between projects!

That's some very smart advice. Thanks for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, StillOffshore said:

As to hiring professionals to do things...make sure you investigate them thoroughly. I’ve been burned by a couple that had great reviews online. Don’t be afraid to call 3-4 of their past clients and go see their work. Make sure every single detail is in the contract and don’t give any more $$ up front than you’re willing to lose. There are a ton of great, fair, skilled contractors out there, but a lot of guys that are not. That’s been my biggest fail in home ownership. Hard learned lessons. 

 

Edit: use yout inspection to negotiate, even small items in need of repair can help shave a few bucks off.

Yes, I am hoping to find somethings in the inspection to help negotiate a better deal. I am currently paying a little more than I was hoping, but a few grand on a better house is more ideal than saving a few grand for a shitty house that needs work. IMO

2 hours ago, diyer2 said:

Agree, don't get in over your head with DIY projects.

You tube, google can be great to help if you decide you want to try to do them.

The key is having the right tools for the job.

Rent them.

I'm a retired construction worker.

Ended my career as a handy man. 

Done it all, roofs to plumbing.

Started as a  painter, then would ask the other tradesmen on jobs if I could help so I could learn.

I had my own small business also until I got burned out. Lots of hours to do it right.

 

To my point.

Get a minimum of 3 bids for all work.

As mentioned, check the contractors out thoroughly. Google can help.

Get some education about the work you're paying to have done so you know what to expect. Google again.

As far as money, I wouldn't pay any up front.

Never pay the full amount of the contract until you're happy with the work.

A remaining balance is a good tool to get thing fixed if need be.

Never pay more than 60% of the contract. Leave a 40% balance. 

Let the contractor prove he can do the job first.

Always ask how long to the the job done.

Make sure there is a signed contract with a completion date.

If they ask for material money up front, I would pass on the contractor.

Always watch the work performed on a daily basis.

Ask questions about things you don't understand.

I would make a point of being home in the morning when the crews show up and home before they leave.

You can track progress, quality and meet the workers to build a rapport with them. Can't hurt.

You can also see if they show up hung over, tired, or just poor condition to work.

I encouraged my customers to be home in the morning and home before I left.

This allowed for good P.R. and if any questions or issues arose the best way to handle them is face to face, not on the phone.

 

These are my opinions.

Good Luck

:happysad:

 

GREAT ADVICE! I need to write these point down. This is exactly what I was looking for. Someone with experience that had key insight. You seem like you were a great person to contract with. Wish their were more people around like you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Sierra 5.3 said:

Yes, I am hoping to find somethings in the inspection to help negotiate a better deal. I am currently paying a little more than I was hoping, but a few grand on a better house is more ideal than saving a few grand for a shitty house that needs work. IMO

GREAT ADVICE! I need to write these point down. This is exactly what I was looking for. Someone with experience that had key insight. You seem like you were a great person to contract with. Wish their were more people around like you. 

Thanks

Be aware that the home inspector probably can't be held responsible for any problems down the road.

 

We bought a mid 6 figure, 20 plus year old home last year. 

The realtor wanted us to use her inspector. $500-$600

I passed, did my own inspection.

The realtor thought I was nuts even though I told her my background.

After 2 hours going over the house she informed me my time was up.

"I said no one told me there was a time limit".

"Call the owner and tell them to have lunch".

"For the price of the house, no ones telling me my times up".

Sorry

That still p*** me off.

:happysad:

P.S.

Make sure any construction contract includes the payment details in writing.

The 60% and 40%. Or what is agreed upon.

This can be 60% payment upon 50% completion or what ever you and the contractor agree on.

Edited by diyer2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks
Be aware that the home inspector probably can't be held responsible for any problems down the road.
 
We bought a mid 6 figure, 20 plus year old home last year. 
The realtor wanted us to use her inspector. $500-$600
I passed, did my own inspection.
The realtor thought I was nuts even though I told her my background.
After 2 hours going over the house she informed me my time was up.
"I said no one told me there was a time limit".
"Call the owner and tell them to have lunch".
"For the price of the house, no ones telling me my times up".
Sorry
That still p*** me of.
:happysad:
 
Yeah, home inspections are a joke...paid $600 for ours.

Radon testing a basement that hasn't been opened up in six months. Then telling me it failed at 4.4 (standard is 4.0)...

Test a private well for just bacteria...what about nitrates, pesticides, herbicides, voc, svoc, etc?

Missed half the electrical issues...

If you know anything about houses, you could probably do your own and be better off.





Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO

There isn't to much I haven't seen in my many years in the trades.

I worked residential, commercial and insurance related.

The biggest thing that made me shake my head was people having a house built that knew nothing. 

They wouldn't hire someone to help them.

Or the ones that would sign the contract to build, never visit the house while under-construction.

Show up to take occupancy and find issues.

:happysad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want a home inspection that is worth something this is the way IMO.

Hire an electrician to do the electrical inspection.

Plumber for plumbing.

Engineer for structural.

My guess would be the average home would cost $1500 - $2000 doing this.

Keep in mind that drywall, flooring, concrete etc. can hide things.

 

I personally don't understand the craze for flipped or remodeled houses.

A house that is x years old and has no issues is a good house.

Cosmetics such as paint and carpet are minor.

 

I would rather buy an original house and have it fixed the way I want it so I know the quality of the work. 

There is a saying that comes to mind, " Putting lipstick on a pig."

Seen it more than once.

Looks good but the problems start showing up.

:happysad:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found (and fixed) more than one issue in my house. The previous owner should have both hands broke...he caused most of my problems. Electrical issues were my biggest problems (electrical boxes buried under sheetrock, shared neutrals on two independent breakers, wires spliced outside of boxes, phone and electric in the same junction box, yada, yada, yada.

If you don't know what you're doing, don't touch it.

Problem is, most of what I found would have been missed by an electrician simply because it was hidden from view. So the general home inspection, done by some guy who may or may not have credentials, is pretty much a waste of time.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, diyer2 said:

Thanks

Be aware that the home inspector probably can't be held responsible for any problems down the road.

 

We bought a mid 6 figure, 20 plus year old home last year. 

The realtor wanted us to use her inspector. $500-$600

I passed, did my own inspection.

The realtor thought I was nuts even though I told her my background.

After 2 hours going over the house she informed me my time was up.

"I said no one told me there was a time limit".

"Call the owner and tell them to have lunch".

"For the price of the house, no ones telling me my times up".

Sorry

That still p*** me off.

:happysad:

P.S.

Make sure any construction contract includes the payment details in writing.

The 60% and 40%. Or what is agreed upon.

This can be 60% payment upon 50% completion or what ever you and the contractor agree on.

I have seen this inspector work before and he seemed to take his job seriously, but I get what you are saying. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, diyer2 said:

If you want a home inspection that is worth something this is the way IMO.

Hire an electrician to do the electrical inspection.

Plumber for plumbing.

Engineer for structural.

My guess would be the average home would cost $1500 - $2000 doing this.

Keep in mind that drywall, flooring, concrete etc. can hide things.

 

I personally don't understand the craze for flipped or remodeled houses.

A house that is x years old and has no issues is a good house.

Cosmetics such as paint and carpet are minor.

 

I would rather buy an original house and have it fixed the way I want it so I know the quality of the work. 

There is a saying that comes to mind, " Putting lipstick on a pig."

Seen it more than once.

Looks good but the problems start showing up.

:happysad:

 

Yeah. This is a 20yr old house so it wasn't remodeled. I did view a few and most of them I found so many areas where they cut corners that it made me doubt the other areas that I couldn't see.

1 hour ago, sdeeter19555 said:

I've found (and fixed) more than one issue in my house. The previous owner should have both hands broke...he caused most of my problems. Electrical issues were my biggest problems (electrical boxes buried under sheetrock, shared neutrals on two independent breakers, wires spliced outside of boxes, phone and electric in the same junction box, yada, yada, yada.

If you don't know what you're doing, don't touch it.

Problem is, most of what I found would have been missed by an electrician simply because it was hidden from view. So the general home inspection, done by some guy who may or may not have credentials, is pretty much a waste of time.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
 

Since this is my first house, I want to get the inspection for a piece of mind. If it's worthless, it is a lesson learned. I just don't feel comfortable doing it myself at this point in my life. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Sierra 5.3 said:

Yeah. This is a 20yr old house so it wasn't remodeled. I did view a few and most of them I found so many areas where they cut corners that it made me doubt the other areas that I couldn't see.

Since this is my first house, I want to get the inspection for a piece of mind. If it's worthless, it is a lesson learned. I just don't feel comfortable doing it myself at this point in my life. 

I'm not saying you shouldn't get a home inspection.

Just realize it's not perfect.

:happysad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve bought a few homes and a couple rentals. I always go through a mainstream reputable agent. I let them handle the inspection process and gets guarantees in writing it’s worth the money.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats on the home and contract.  I hope everything turns out well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the inspection by a known home inspector is worth it. My last one was around $400, and I got a nice binder with the results, a dvd with the results, and the guy emailed me a pdf file with the same. I find it helped with the sellers. Having an “expert” say that the 22yr old ac units needed to be replaced went much further than me saying the same thing. Saved me a ton of money in the long run. Every house needs something. 

I would say, you paid for the inspection, so it belongs to you. Don’t feel pressured to give it to anyone. If the inspection shows the panel box needs to be replaced, show them the part that mentions that when asking for an allowance for the panel box, not the whole inspection. Smaller items, I would just say a few “little things need attention” and not specify much else, just ask for a few bucks depending on what needs work or refreshment. If you’re fair and honest, most people will accept that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Popular Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.