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Tire Rotation


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#1 Fuddrucker

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 06:04 PM

I was always under the impression that for steel belted radial tires, you rotate front to back with NO criss cross because the steel belts are now use to rotating in the forward direction. If you criss cross, the steel belts are now rotating in the opposite direction and could rip the tire apart from the inside because of the force being generated in the opposite direction. Makes sence to me when I think about it. I don't remember who told me this, but I remember being told that a long time ago.

Anyway, I went to rotate my tires and the owners manual showed a diagram with moving the fronts straight to the back, and the backs crossed over to the front. I have the original tires (Bridgestone I believe) and they are steel belted radial tires. Which is it??? :D

Thanks.

#2 OBXSpook

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 06:18 PM

No idea.......... :D I always though you just switch front to back, and you don't do side to side anymore????

#3 varmint2506

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 06:56 PM

If memory serves me correctly, you can X most tires now days unless they are marked directional.
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#4 Shaners

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 07:20 PM

If memory serves me correctly, you can X most tires now days unless they are marked directional.

That is correct!!! Don't X directional tires...

GM says to cross the tires. and that's the way I've always done it since I got my first car with radials on it over 20 years ago.

I think the most important thing is to rotate often... Once the tires start to wear funny it's too late and the damage is done!

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#5 99silveradoz71

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 11:59 PM

Did my Revo's yesterday with the front flip...they're not directional are they? Anyone...anyone? Buehler? :D
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#6 asepgrad98

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 08:29 AM

if they are directional they will have an arrow on the sidewall showing which way they should spin.
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#7 Bubba14

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 10:09 AM

If you have directional tires does that mean you can't back up? :D
I have always crossed mine and I have had no problems :lol:

#8 varmint2506

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 10:29 AM

On front wheel drive cars, rotate the tires in a forward cross pattern (fig. A) or the alternative X pattern (fig. B)
On rear wheel or four wheel drive vehicles, rotate the tires in a rearward cross pattern (fig. C) or the alternative X pattern (fig. B)
If you car has directional wheels or tires, rotate them as shown in fig D.
If you car has non-directional tires that are a different size from front to rear, rotate them as shown in fig. E.

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1998 GMC Z71 HD
4.5 inch Tuff Country Lift
35's on American Racing Wheels
DynoMax Dual's
1991 Chevy 4x4 (Daily ride)
1989 Chevy 4x4 (Farm truck)
2005 Chevy RST (The red rocket)
2001 Suburban (The better half's ride)

1998 GMC Pics

#9 jhm

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 10:36 AM

Front to back and back to front. Doing anything else gives no advantage.

#10 97whitez71

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 11:28 AM

I got 70,000+ out of my last set of tires with front to back, back to front rotation every 6,000 miles and still had a little tread left. Much easier to do it this way and no funny wear problems. Just my 2 cents. Oh, the tires were Wild Country RVT's.

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#11 airbalancer

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 03:43 PM

I know it is an unguy thing to do but I openned the owner manual to 5-68.
It shows left back to left front, left front to right back , right back to right front and right front to left back. It also shows rotation if you want to see your spare.
Sorry that I read the manual
:D

#12 PFarkas

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 05:28 PM

Front to back and back to front. Doing anything else gives no advantage.


Not true.

Changing the primary rotational direction of the tire (side to side, X, or modified-X (when including the spare in the rotation)) allows each side, leading and trailing, of the tread to see similar wear.

Additionally, our trucks are rarely set up with equal side to side weight distribution. In my truck, the driver's side usually weighs 400 pounds (180 pound driver and ~200 pounds fuel) more than the passenger side.


Whether or not an X or modified-X rotation results in a significant extension of tread life is debatable.

I will continue to use a modified-X rotation because it is recommended by the truck manufacturer (GM), the tire manufacturer (BFGoodrich), and it makes sense to me.


Don't take my word for it. If you have any doubts, call the customer support line of your tire manufacturer. They are the experts.

#13 varmint2506

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 06:00 PM

Front to back and back to front. Doing anything else gives no advantage.


Not true.

Changing the primary rotational direction of the tire (side to side, X, or modified-X (when including the spare in the rotation)) allows each side, leading and trailing, of the tread to see similar wear.

I agree. Front tire cup is a perfect example.
1998 GMC Z71 HD
4.5 inch Tuff Country Lift
35's on American Racing Wheels
DynoMax Dual's
1991 Chevy 4x4 (Daily ride)
1989 Chevy 4x4 (Farm truck)
2005 Chevy RST (The red rocket)
2001 Suburban (The better half's ride)

1998 GMC Pics

#14 JayMan

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 06:49 PM

If you have directional tires does that mean you can't back up? :D
I have always crossed mine and I have had no problems :lol:

HAHA! Yer funny!

Seriously, I've always x-crossed my tires during rotation. Same as when I take it in for an alignment/balance they also x-cross the tires.

My truck came with the Firestone tires and they made a NASTY loud noise when I first x-crossed them at 3,000 miles. That went away after about 100 miles.

My Michelin LTX M/S are almost silent. They appear to wear very well following the x-cross, so far 35,000 miles and less than half the tread is gone.
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#15 airbalancer

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 07:11 PM

Additionally, our trucks are rarely set up with equal side to side weight distribution. In my truck, the driver's side usually weighs 400 pounds (180 pound driver and ~200 pounds fuel) more than the passenger side

The last time I was 180 pound was about 25 years ago.:D