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Tire Rotation


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#16 JayMan

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 11:38 PM

Additionally, our trucks are rarely set up with equal side to side weight distribution. In my truck, the driver's side usually weighs 400 pounds (180 pound driver and ~200 pounds fuel) more than the passenger side

The last time I was 180 pound was about 25 years ago.:devil:

Join the club my friend. You have my sympathies.

Personally, I think it's a Conspiracy that Thanksgiving and Christmas are so close together. It would be very impolite to refuse to eat during those two holidays.
Jerry

2000 GMC Sierra 4WD SLT Extended Cab, Sunset Gold Metallic, Sportside, Z71, 4.10 gears, G80 Gov-Lok, Z82 towing

#17 jhm

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 08:20 AM

I dont believe X style rotating will not extend the useable life of your tires. I dont care what the owners manual shows. They dont design,produce or warranty tires. I have always rotated front-back-back-front EVERY 5000 MILES, NO EXCEPTIONS. The majority of people do not rotate tires period. The shop where I buy my tires offers free rotation every 5K. The owner told me that the only customers who complain about tire tread life are the people who admit they don't rotate. About tire cupping: it has NOTHING to do with rotating the tires, it is caused by bad alignment, unbalanced tires, bad front end suspension components or incorrect (too low air pressure). Lots of people don't even check air pressure and some that do use those $1.00 pencil gauges that are worthless. A good digital gage and front to back rotating have kept my tires wearing perfectly on every vehicle we have owned. Everyones got thier perfect method, I personally would have a hard time remembering which direction in the x to go on every vehicle every 5k miles, I dont plan to start making sketches. :devil:

#18 carguru

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 10:28 AM

Since I have the tendency to corner hard in mine and feather the edges on the fronts, x rotation is the way to go to straigten them back out. It doesn't matter if you do front to rear or x, as long as the tires gets rotated.

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#19 PFarkas

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 03:43 PM

I dont believe X style rotating will not extend the useable life of your tires. I dont care what the owners manual shows. They dont design,produce or warranty tires.

It is your right to not care what the owner's manual says.

The original poster read his manual, noted that the stated procedure contradicted what he had "heard a long time ago", and came to us for input.

While the manufacturer, in this case GM, is not a tire manufacturer, they do specify the tires that are original equipment for the vehicle. As such, they are in a position to suggest best practices for the tires that are supplied with the vehicle.

To specificly address the concerns of the original poster, this page from Bridgestone states that "The 'Cross Pattern' provides the best results and can be performed on any Front or Rear Wheel Drive vehicle equipped with 4 non-unidirectional tires. (Unidirectional tires must be rotated front to rear only.)"

The folks at Michelin, who own the BFGoodrich brand, concur, as shown here.

I have always rotated front-back-back-front EVERY 5000 MILES, NO EXCEPTIONS. The majority of people do not rotate tires period. The shop where I buy my tires offers free rotation every 5K. The owner told me that the only customers who complain about tire tread life are the people who admit they don't rotate.

Certainly the concensus is that rotating the tires is better than not rotating them. Nobody has suggested otherwise.

About tire cupping: it has NOTHING to do with rotating the tires, it is caused by bad alignment, unbalanced tires, bad front end suspension components or incorrect (too low air pressure).

Cupping is also caused by worn bearings, mismounted wheel assemblies, and mismatched or inconsistently inflated duals.

While cupping is not caused by a failure to rotate in a particular manner, an x type rotation will serve to minimize the amount of cupping and extend the service life of a cupped tire.

Of course, if someone observes cupping on their tires, they should have their suspension examined and corrected as needed.

Lots of people don't even check air pressure and some that do use those $1.00 pencil gauges that are worthless.

Everyone should check their tire pressure. I'm glad that you do. I wish more people did.

Matching tires and tire pressure to the application is necessary in order to achieve long tire life.

Not only does incorrect inflation cause premature and uneven tread wear, it also results in an unsafe condition.

It is also worth noting that appropriate tire pressure is a function of the load presented to the tire. For a vehicle with a nominally uniform weight distribution (my Honda, for example), having all four corners at the same pressure is correct. For my truck, however, while it is empty I run the front tires at a higher pressure than the rear because the front of the truck is heavier than the rear. When I plan to work the bed or otherwise load it substantially, I add air to the rear tires.

Everyones got thier perfect method, I personally would have a hard time remembering which direction in the x to go on every vehicle every 5k miles, I dont plan to start making sketches. 

I'm glad you are satisfied with the results of your procedure.

Like you, I have a hard time remembering which direction in the x to go, and am unwilling to make a sketch for each of my vehicles. However, I don't have to make such a sketch. I get the owner's manual out each time I rotate my tires. I have to, because the manual is on top of my tire pressure gage.


There are many discussions about tire rotation, here and in other forums. Many people still believe that an X rotation will cause the tire to fail. They believe this for the same reasons that the original poster did, specificly because "[someone] told me this" ... "a long time ago."

A long time ago it was true, however tires made with a current manufacturing processes don't suffer from the same limitations that their predecessors did. Tire manufacturers recommend an X pattern for tires that do not have a directional tread. For tires with a directional tread, they still recommend a front-to-back rotation, indicating that some rotation is better than none.

#20 varmint2506

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 04:14 PM

:devil:

Your not stupid PFarkas, I with ya anyhow. :D
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#21 jhm

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Posted 12 February 2004 - 07:30 AM

PFarkas, When the MFR specifies OE tires for a vehicle, they are going with whatever tire they can get for the lowest price. This is why you almost always get crap tires on a new vehicle. Because of this they are in a position to suggest best practices for tire maintenance? I personally do not care for either Michelin or BFG tires, I find they are overpriced and certainly no better quality than American made Cooper tires, the French make fairly good wine, thats about it. The reasons you give for cupping are what I already stated, someone said front tire cupping was due to not rotating in the x pattern which is totally incorrect. It seems that you believe everything in the owners manual to be gospel, where does it say to increase tire pressure when you load the bed? The added air will not allow you to carry more weight, the tire must be rated for the extra load which is why extra load tires have additional plies in the sidewall, the added air will only put more pressure on your already strained sidewall making your condition worse. As far as getting the owners manual out each time you rotate your tires, this is fine, I just prefer the simple front-back method because it works for me, like I said, my tires are rotated ever 5K with no exceptions and I have never had any type of irregular tire wear. Checking the inflation pressure is probably even more important. The wrong pressure will ruin any brand of tire very quickly. Wether or not the x pattern can cause a tire to fail is probably dictated by the MFR's producability methods more than the x pattern itself.

#22 PFarkas

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Posted 12 February 2004 - 05:05 PM

I think that the original posters concerns have been adequately addressed by now.

If he, or anyone else is curious, the only tire rotation procedure that Cooper Tire documents on their web page can be viewed here.


I'd like to respond in detail to your assertion that I perceive the owners manual to be gospel and the implication that I prefer French product to American (I don't).

I leave it to you to start another thread in another forum, perhaps "Bash/Rant". If you'd like me to participate, please let me know via private message.

#23 varmint2506

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Posted 12 February 2004 - 05:25 PM

someone said front tire cupping was due to not rotating in the x pattern which is totally incorrect.

I mentioned cupping in my response earlier. I never said it was caused by any type of rotation! I was simply agreeing with PFarkas idea on lead and lag edges of tires. I used cupping as and example of lead and lag edges.

...and for the record, every 4x4 that I have ever owned cupped the front tires. Some more than others.
1998 GMC Z71 HD
4.5 inch Tuff Country Lift
35's on American Racing Wheels
DynoMax Dual's
1991 Chevy 4x4 (Daily ride)
1989 Chevy 4x4 (Farm truck)
2005 Chevy RST (The red rocket)
2001 Suburban (The better half's ride)

1998 GMC Pics