Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Recommended Posts

Hey Great that answered my question........but does plugging in your coolant heater prevent this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it has to get down to like 0 or colder for it to gel. Here we have winter blend and so far never had a problem. They also have an additive you can put in that will prevent it too. I'm guessing with the name VegasDude, the chances of it happening to you is pretty rare (altho I do remember it being 15 one time there).

 

I have yet to plug mine in yet and I'm in WI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What BIGDOGS said....... and there is a small heater on the fuel filter from what I hear. It heats up the fuel before it enters the filter. Here in MN, almost all the fuel stations have winter blend. At Holiday stations they have Premium Diesel and is good to -30 in certain months. Fuel mileage goes down, but it's better than it gelling up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in Vegas, but I go to Utah to snowmobile and it gets down to -5 or so on a regular basis on the mountain..................what is the name of that additive and where can you buy it? Thanks for the help. This site is a great resource...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like to run straight #2 fuel colder than 20 degrees if going on a long drive. You can push it colder than that, and I have, but then you are taking the risk of possibly walking to the nearest gas station and it's your feet that are going to get cold!

 

Plugging in your truck won't prevent the fuel from gelling. It only will keep the engine coolant warmer to provide easier startup.

 

The fuel is gelling in the tank and then the filter wil clog with the parafin wax that is created, cutting back on power and eventually putting you on the side of the road. If it completely dies, then you'll end up taking the truck into a nice heated shop to wait for the fuel to liquify and probably change the fuel filter. If it does still idle, do not shut it off! At least the warm fuel return will help matters a little until you can get a bottle of additive in the tank circulating.

 

Best bet is play it safe and use blended fuel if available when the weather starts to turn colder. Better than walking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I try to use is called Artic Diesel that I get at Fleet Farm. It has the cold weather properties of the winter blend but does not have the loss in power. You can check it out at www.articdiesel.com (think that is the www page) If I can't get that I use the blend at the local Citgo and then put in this stuff I get at Walmart in a white bottle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen in truck stops & dealers here in Canada, a yellowish/gold additive that comes in a clear gallon jug w/ a yellow label. If someone knows who makes it post it here. I think it's an additive to prevent jelling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you just want the additive you can get the stuff at most any auto parts stores (in cold areas) even Walmarts sell it here. The stuff I used was in a white jug as it does NOT contain alcohol which they say is bad for the diesel fuel system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If traveling from Las Vegas to Utah, then I suggest you tank up in Utah before heading into the mountains, chances are they might be selling #1 diesel (often referred to as winter diesel) which is mixed for a colder climate and less prone to gelling.

 

DEWPFO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Popular Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.