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Where is the Fuel filter on 07 Silverado?


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#1 Stash

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 06:50 AM

Just curious.

Where is th fuel filter on a 07 silverado 4.8??

I remember the old days where it was in the fuel line near the carb and took 5 minutes to change, but not sure where they locate them now??--In the gas tank??

User chanageable??

Thanks!


Stash

#2 Wingnut

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 07:01 AM

As far as I know...They're all in the tank these days.
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#3 gmcjoe

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 07:37 AM

yep in the tank. Nice move GM...

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#4 TEE

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 12:45 PM

What kind of "boneheaded" engineering FUBAR is that?
If I'd known some of the issues with these NBS trucks...I may not have bought my 04'!

:crackup:

#5 1999 Tahoe 4x4

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 03:50 PM

Are you guys sure it is in the tank? It sure seems to be an odd location for the filter. Isn't it supposed to be a regularly serviced item? :crackup:

As far as on my 1999 it is under the driver seat on the inside of the fram rail. And even that is a bit of a bitch to change compared with the older underhood locations.

Edited by 1999 Tahoe 4x4, 24 October 2006 - 03:51 PM.


#6 roca

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 04:27 PM

Does anyone know where is it in a 2003 Yukon Denali?

#7 redvett

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 05:45 PM

GM started in 2004 on trucks but other MFR's started as early as 1998 because of fuel vapor emissions required by the Fed's. the filter is lifetime as long as you use top tier fuels.

#8 1999 Tahoe 4x4

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 06:45 PM

Oh great. Many of us who are living in large urban areas are standing in traffic more that two hours a day blasting out pollutants and this is what the Fed's come up with to improve air quality.

:crackup:

The filter in the tank requirement will make all the difference?

Edited by 1999 Tahoe 4x4, 25 October 2006 - 06:46 PM.


#9 C & A s Dad

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 10:08 PM

Rolando, your filter is inside the frame just under the passenger seat. Do not attemtpt to change it without the proper release tool.
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#10 roca

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 10:14 PM

Rolando, your filter is inside the frame just under the passenger seat. Do not attemtpt to change it without the proper release tool.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Thanks a lot. And what would be the proper tool, i really donīt like to take my cars to the dealer if i donīt have to.

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#11 1999 Tahoe 4x4

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 11:22 PM

Now this makes me curious. Did you find it? Is it inside the frame rail on your 2004 on not? What is the deal here?

#12 Wingnut

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 02:40 AM

His is an '03. And like redvett said...I'm pretty sure it was '04 when they moved it to the tank.

But I thought it was on the drivers side C & A s Dad. My '92 and my '02 were on the drivers side anyway.
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#13 gmcjoe

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 06:37 AM

I do not buy the lifetime filters BS for a minute. They put it their for cost savings.

All of the sudden, contamination won't eventually block the filter? Load of crap IMO

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#14 redvett

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 04:19 PM

Here is an article on returnless fuel systems and why the filter is in the tank.
Returnless Fuel Systems
by Karl Seyfert

October 2004. Returnless fuel systems, while similar to conventional systems, require careful handling to assure proper function and full component life.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To ensure adequate fuel pressure and volume under constantly changing operating conditions, conventional fuel systems always pump more fuel to the injectors than is ultimately needed. That means one molecule of fuel might make as many as 30 trips to the engine via the fuel rail before it finally passes through an injector and is converted to energy. Each trip adds heat to the fuel, which is returned to the fuel tank. In-tank fuel temperatures can exceed 160°F on a hot summer day-a prime breeding ground for fuel evaporation. Even if it's properly contained, vaporized fuel can contribute to a variety of driveability problems. Remember carburetor vapor lock?

To combat these problems, several vehicle manufacturers have introduced fuel systems that reduce the number of tank-to-engine trips to just one. Because these systems do not have a return line to return the unused fuel from the engine to the tank, they have been dubbed returnless fuel systems. This is something of a misnomer, as the unused fuel really is returned to the tank. It just doesn't have quite such a long return trip to make. These systems were introduced in the mid-'90s, and their use is rapidly expanding.

On returnless systems, fuel is picked up via the fuel screen sock at the bottom of the tank, then routed to the fuel pump. The pump supplies the needed fuel pressure and volume to the engine and the excess is directed back into the tank after passing through a pressure regulator.
The regulator lacks the vacuum connection to the engine that we're accustomed to seeing on conventional pressure regulators, so its job is to maintain a steady pressure independent of any changes in engine operating conditions. To make sure the engine always receives just the right amount of fuel for current conditions, the PCM makes rapid changes in injector pulse width instead. On some newer fuel systems, a pressure sensor keeps the PCM informed of system fuel pressure.
The PCM responds by modifying the pulse width to the fuel pump power supply, adjusting system pressure and volume on the fly. These newer systems completely eliminate the need for a separate pressure regulator.

One advantage of the older return-type fuel systems was the constant filtering of the fuel they provided. Each time the fuel made a trip to the engine, it had to pass through the fuel filter. The filter trapped tiny particles of dirt or debris that may have found their way into the system.
This cut down on component wear and service was relatively simple because the filter was usually in an easily accessible location outside the fuel tank.

Returnless fuel systems also have fuel filters, but where those filters are placed can have a big effect on the longevity of the system, as well as its ease of service and repair. The filter can be placed in any of three different locations. The first is the conventional location outside the tank. While this is the easiest to service, it also means that any unused fuel that's returned to the tank is never filtered until it makes its first and only trip to the engine. So if it contains any contamination, the same junk will make repeated trips through the pump and back into the tank.
A load of rusty fuel could pass repeatedly through the fuel pump, grinding the rust particles into increasingly smaller particles and making short work of the pump itself.

Placing the filter in front of the pump protects the pump from contamination, but creates other problems. The most obvious drawback is that the filter is now in the tank, so replacing it is a major deal. A filter that's become clogged with debris means the pump now has to suck extra hard just to get the fuel it needs. This causes low fuel pressure, fuel boiling and pump cavitation. So-called lifetime filters are supposed to alleviate all of these drawbacks.

The last option is to place the filter after the pressure regulator, before the unused fuel is returned to the tank. This allows the unused fuel to be filtered repeatedly, until it's finally used. A restricted fuel filter is less likely to have an adverse effect on the fuel pump, and the filter can be placed in a location on top of the tank that is easily accessible for replacement.

Fuel system cleanliness is important on any system, but never more so than on a returnless system. Any dirt left behind will quickly damage any new components you install.

#15 mmmikkke

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 04:28 PM

I guess that lets the red states off the hook.
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