Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • 0
gbrainerd

P1351 Error Code

Question

I have a 99 Suburban with a 350 that died while driving. I have a DTC P1351 and the diag leads me to a poor ground for the ignition module. I'm having a hard time with this because I have a hot spark and the unit will start if I spray some fuel in the throttle body. I'm looking more for a fuel injection problem. Is the ignition module connected to the fuel injection in any way?

 

The diag also points me to ground cell 14. Where the heck is that?

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

0 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

Also having the same issue on a 96 Suburban 350. Have spark and fuel. Could it be the fuel regulator under the upper intake manifold??? Had heard when they fail, sometimes they will flood the engine causing a no start condition. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg,

 

While we're waiting additional responses, see below, found it on another post. Going to check it out. I'll let you know what I find.

 

Frank

 

 

There are alot of problems with extended crank times causing a false P1351 to set. Does your vehicle require long crank times to start? If so, the code may be a "false" code.

Install your fuel pressure gauge and check the pressure. It should hold with the key off. If it doesn't hold, then you'll need to check for a leaking injector causing a rich condition which would require a long crank time to clear out the excess fuel(which sets the code intermittently) before the engine willl start. It's possible for the fuel pressure regulator to leak only when the engine is running. I've personally experienced that. Start with fuel pressure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gave up on the DTC code being the cause of the no start. I don't know where that came from, but if I can spray carb cleaner in the intake and get a start, the no start isn't a spark problem. It may not be right, but it won't cause a no start condition. I checked the injector pulse with a noid light, and they are all hitting. That left me with a fuel supply problem. I got a fuel pressure gauge and measured it. It showed only 15 PSI. As I've got it figured out, that won't allow the poppet valves in the injectors to open to charge the injectors with fuel so they can feed the cylinder. I had to order a pump because all the pumps anyone here had in stock had the flat four electrical connector, and mine is square. I don't want to cut the harness to put in a different connector anywhere on the vehicle and especially not where I can't easily get at it. The pump should be in tomorrow- I'll let you know how that works.

 

The big lesson for me in this is that it doesn't matter how fancy the electronics are, check the fuel and spark first. A DTC code is great if it's a sensor that's failed or if it isn't running right, but if it won't start it's either fuel or spark. I could have saved myself a great deal of time and distress if I'd measured the fuel pressure earlier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I gave up on the DTC code being the cause of the no start. I don't know where that came from, but if I can spray carb cleaner in the intake and get a start, the no start isn't a spark problem. It may not be right, but it won't cause a no start condition. I checked the injector pulse with a noid light, and they are all hitting. That left me with a fuel supply problem. I got a fuel pressure gauge and measured it. It showed only 15 PSI. As I've got it figured out, that won't allow the poppet valves in the injectors to open to charge the injectors with fuel so they can feed the cylinder. I had to order a pump because all the pumps anyone here had in stock had the flat four electrical connector, and mine is square. I don't want to cut the harness to put in a different connector anywhere on the vehicle and especially not where I can't easily get at it. The pump should be in tomorrow- I'll let you know how that works.

 

The big lesson for me in this is that it doesn't matter how fancy the electronics are, check the fuel and spark first. A DTC code is great if it's a sensor that's failed or if it isn't running right, but if it won't start it's either fuel or spark. I could have saved myself a great deal of time and distress if I'd measured the fuel pressure earlier.

 

The flat connector is part of a redesign. You should put in the new connector.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I gave up on the DTC code being the cause of the no start. I don't know where that came from, but if I can spray carb cleaner in the intake and get a start, the no start isn't a spark problem. It may not be right, but it won't cause a no start condition. I checked the injector pulse with a noid light, and they are all hitting. That left me with a fuel supply problem. I got a fuel pressure gauge and measured it. It showed only 15 PSI. As I've got it figured out, that won't allow the poppet valves in the injectors to open to charge the injectors with fuel so they can feed the cylinder. I had to order a pump because all the pumps anyone here had in stock had the flat four electrical connector, and mine is square. I don't want to cut the harness to put in a different connector anywhere on the vehicle and especially not where I can't easily get at it. The pump should be in tomorrow- I'll let you know how that works.

 

The big lesson for me in this is that it doesn't matter how fancy the electronics are, check the fuel and spark first. A DTC code is great if it's a sensor that's failed or if it isn't running right, but if it won't start it's either fuel or spark. I could have saved myself a great deal of time and distress if I'd measured the fuel pressure earlier.

 

The flat connector is part of a redesign. You should put in the new connector.

 

 

 

 

Greg and Sparkstech,

 

Sorry to get back so late in the game, but also found my problem as well. I too should have went back to the basics at the onset of my no start. You see a code and you want to jump right in and let the computer solve the issue for you and often times this only gets you off track. Turns out my problem was not fuel related. I had fuel AND spark! However, I checked the spark again and found it to be weak. Suspected the Ignition Control Module (ICM) and sure enough, that was the problem. Didn't think I would have gotten any spark if the module was bad, but lesson learned. I replaced the ICM about two years ago, so wrote it off as being okay. Again, lesson learned. No matter how high tech the cars are getting today, never rule out the basics.....fuel, air, and GOOD fire. Hopefully this helps others down the road with their troubleshooting.

 

Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suck,push,bang,poof, if they don't do it they don't run. If they do it inefficently the pcm might give us a clue but not an answer. I'm glad you found it. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Popular Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.