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98 K1500 5.7 Swapped In A 99 5.7 Got Hesitation And P1345 Code


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#1 lure&flyguy

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 12:59 AM

Hey folks I have a 98 K1500 with a 5.7. I swapped in a 5.7 out of a 99 Tahoe. The swap went well, but I have the Service Engine Soon light, got the code scanned at the zone place. They came up with P1345. Some things I had to do involving the swap was R&R the distributor for clearance during reinstall of motor, I also had to swap out the central injection unit from the old motor (someone cracked off one of the fuel line hold down studs). Reused the old manifold seal. . . Was this a mistake? Of coursed cleaned everything inside and gasket and mating surfaces. I did crack one of the little "butterfly" clips that hold one of the injector lines into the motor. It seemed to hold well with one of the two tabs. Will this be a problem down the road?

Some other tidbits of info. . . The spark plugs (although I cleaned and regapped them)and plug wires are kinda ratty, even had to put some electrical tape over one cracked wire, when plugging in the CPS I noticed the wire had some cracked insulation from being tied down tight. The wire itself wasnt damaged so I taped it up and added some around the wiring up to the plug to somewhat seal it.

From what I've been seeing on the forum this code points to the distributor being off a tooth one way or the other. Should I be focusing on this? My buddy did the R&R on the distributor. . . I took his word it went back in where it came from.

I will be doing plugs and wires on it tomorrow and further inspecting the CPS. When the joker I bought the motor from loaded it onto a small skid' the motor may have either bumped or rested on the CPS.

I guess my questions are mainly what is causing the p1345 code in your opinion considering all above info, also how do I set the timing on this motor, and what are the specs. Do I have to unplug anything to set the timing? Lastly do you think cracking one of the hold in tabs on the injector line will mess me up down the road?

This post was kind of rambling. . . Hope one of you good people can offer some advice. Thank you in advance. .

#2 lure&flyguy

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:05 AM

Oh yeah. . . It's pretty hard starting too. I'd say 10-15 seconds crank time per start.

#3 Texas Jim

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 07:57 AM

My guess at this point is that the distributor is off by one tooth.

I believe that the cam position sensor is in the distributor and the crankshaft position sensor is on the front of the motor.

I think that code means that the signals from them do not match up.

If you do pull the distributor...BE SURE to check for wear on the drive gear.
Replace gear as necessary.
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#4 lure&flyguy

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 10:50 AM

Thanks for the info Jim! I had the distributor out for the swap not more than two weeks ago and the gear looked solid. I was told motor had 55k on it when pulled from the Tahoe. Do you know how to set the timing on this motor? If so what are the specs? I'm gonna try the nickel and dime stuff first (plugs, wires, crank sensor wiring and maybe swap sensor from the old motor) and see if it helps, if not, I will be focusing on the distributor

#5 pennzoil29

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 03:04 PM

My guess at this point is that the distributor is off by one tooth.

I believe that the cam position sensor is in the distributor and the crankshaft position sensor is on the front of the motor.

I think that code means that the signals from them do not match up.

If you do pull the distributor...BE SURE to check for wear on the drive gear.
Replace gear as necessary.


yep, that's where it is
by the damper

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#6 Mindcrime Opr8r

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 06:24 PM

DTC 1345 means the crank and cam signals don't match up. You need to remove the dist turn engine to tdc compression stroke. timing pointer will match up with damper.
Turn dist till dimple in dist gear lines up with white mark on housing and install. Upon install dist will turn and line up with #8 marking(NOT #6 that is for V6) on dist body. Run to operating temp with scanner adjust CMP to 0 +or-2degrees above 1000 rpm. Clear code and recheck. The hard start may or may not be related. Fix DTC 1345 first. You may have a CTS problem that may not be setting a code, look at the CTS voltages on scanner, you could also have a fuel pump problem causing the long crank. Fuel pump may not be holding pressure on shut down.

Edited by Mindcrime Opr8r, 27 February 2009 - 06:28 PM.

Because Life is NOT a Rehearsal-CRTC Crisis Resolution Training Consultants

#7 lure&flyguy

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 08:13 AM

Can I do this without a scan tool? How critical is relearning the cam position sensor?

#8 lure&flyguy

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 09:05 AM

I found the ALLDATA procedure with diagrams after some poking around on that g search engine. Here it is in case others may need it. Thanks for all the advice everyone has offered. PS **** the general!!!



A. Here is the procedure.

IMPORTANT: Rotate the number 1 cylinder to Top Dead Center (TDC) of the compression stroke. The engine front cover has 2 alignment tabs and the crankshaft balancer has 2 alignment marks (spaced 90 apart) which are used for positioning number 1 piston at Top Dead Center (TDC) . With the piston on the compression stroke and at top dead center, the crankshaft balancer alignment mark (1) must align with the engine front cover tab (2) and the crankshaft balancer alignment mark (4) must align with the engine front cover tab (3). Posted Image
  • Rotate the crankshaft balancer clockwise until the alignment marks on the crankshaft balancer are aligned with the tabs on the engine front cover and the number 1 piston is at top dead center of the compression stroke.
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  • Align white paint mark on the bottom stem of the distributor, and the pre-drilled indent hole in the bottom of the gear (3). NOTE: The OBD II ignition system distributor driven gear and rotor may be installed in multiple positions. In order to avoid mistakes, mark the distributor on the following components in order to ensure the same mounting position upon reassembly:
  • The distributor driven gear
  • The distributor shaft
  • The rotor holes
Installing the driven gear 180 degrees out of alignment, or locating the rotor in the wrong holes, will cause a no-start condition. Premature engine wear or damage may result.

  • With the gear in this position, the rotor segment should be positioned as shown for a V6 engine (1) or V8 engine (2).
    • The alignment will not be exact.
    • If the driven gear is installed incorrectly, the dimple will be approximately 180 degrees opposite of the rotor segment when the gear is installed in the distributor.
  • Using a long screw driver, align the oil pump drive shaft to the drive tab of the distributor.
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  • Guide the distributor into the engine. Ensure that the spark plug towers are perpendicular to the centerline of the engine.
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  • Once the distributor is fully seated, the rotor segment should be aligned with the pointer cast into the distributor base.
  • This pointer may have a 6 cast into it, indicating that the distributor is to be used on a 6 cylinder engine or a 8 cast into it, indicating that the distributor is to be used on a 8 cylinder engine.
  • If the rotor segment does not come within a few degrees of the pointer, the gear mesh between the distributor and the camshaft may be off a tooth or more.
  • If this is the case, repeat the procedure again in order to achieve proper alignment.
Posted Image
  • Install the distributor mounting clamp bolt. Tighten the distributor clamp bolt to 25 N.m (18 lb ft).
  • Install the distributor cap.
  • Install two NEW distributor cap screws. Tighten the screws to 2.4 N.m (21 lb in) .
  • Install the electrical connector to the distributor.
  • Install the spark plug wires to the distributor cap.
  • Install the ignition coil wire. The wire must not touch anything like the dip stick. Rubbing will make a ground/short after time of use.
  • For V-8 engines, connect a scan tool.
  • Monitor the Camshaft Retard Offset value. Refer to Computers and Control Systems Camshaft Retard Offset Adjustment. IMPORTANT: If the Malfunction Indicator lamp is turned on after installing the distributor, and a DTC P1345 is found, the distributor has been installed incorrectly.
  • Refer to Installation Procedure 2 for proper distributor installation.


#9 Arend

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 04:07 PM

Hello All,

I have a similiar problem. I just bought a 2000 GMC 2500 with a 5.7L in it. The MIL is on and the guy that sold it to me, told me the distributor isn't in correctly. It runs fine and has plenty of power. I wasn't concerned about the code till I found out they won't smog check me with the MIL on. I pulled the distributor out and moved it one tooth foward(clockwise) cleared the code and started it back up. P1345 again. I move it backward(counter-clockwise) 2 teeth cleared the code and started it again. Again a P1345. I looked at the distributor carefully and it has a "6" on it not and "8" is that going to matter? Also at this point do I need some more hi-tech equipment to fix this? Should I take it to someone? It's very difficult to see the timing mark above the damper.




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