Full list of GM plant closures – 14 facilities affected – Michigan/Ohio bear brunt

Full list of GM plant closures – 14 facilities affected – Michigan/Ohio bear brunt

Posted on 01. Jun, 2009 by in Business



DETROIT, Mich. – General Motors Corp. (NYSE: GM) today announced details of its accelerated manufacturing plan to improve capacity utilization and flexibility for the New GM. GM also reaffirmed it will build a small car at one of its U.S. assembly plants on standby capacity status.

The manufacturing plan reduces GM’s total number of assembly, powertrain and stamping facilities in the U.S. from 47 in 2008 to 34 by the end of 2010 and 33 by 2012. These totals reflect GM’s recently announced plans to build a future small car in the U.S. Under this plan, the New GM will achieve full capacity utilization of its assembly operations in 2011, two years ahead of what was scheduled in its Feb. 17 viability plan submission. This will result in lower fixed costs per vehicle sold, and lower and more efficient capital investment.

The New GM, under agreement with the U.S. Treasury, will consist of GM’s strongest operations and brands from around the world, resulting in substantially less debt and lower operating costs than GM historically has carried.

“Our manufacturing operations, which already are among the most productive in the industry, will emerge even leaner, stronger and more flexible, as part of the New GM, ” said Gary Cowger Group Vice President of GM Global Manufacturing and Labor Relations. “Flexible manufacturing enables us to quickly respond to consumer preferences and changing market conditions.”

GM’s Service and Parts Operations (SPO) announced today that it will cease operations at three Parts Distribution Centers in Boston; Columbus, Ohio; and Jacksonville, Fla. – by Dec. 31, 2009.

“As GM strengthens its aftersales business, we’re aggressively pursuing strategies that allow us to continue fast parts delivery to our dealers and distributors, and improve our warehouse capacity utilization,” said Kevin W. Williams, GMNA Vice President and General Manager, Service and Parts Operations.

Additionally, GM will build a future small car in the United States utilizing a UAW-GM assembly plant on standby capacity status, with major metal stampings supported from a UAW-GM U.S. stamping plant also on standby capacity. This new small car will play a vital role in GM’s plans to improve the fuel efficiency of its vehicle fleet. Small cars represent one of the fastest growing segments in both the U.S. and around the world. The re-tooled assembly plant will be capable of building 160,000 cars annually. Selection of the site will be determined in the future.

The list of impacted U.S. GM plants follows:

June 1, 2009 U.S. GM Manufacturing Optimization Plan Actions

Plant Status / Timing
(date listed or sooner depending on market demand)
Assembly
Orion, Mich. Standby Capacity – September 2009
Pontiac, Mich. Close – October 2009
Spring Hill, Tenn. Standby Capacity – November 2009
Wilmington, Del. Close – July 2009
Stamping
Grand Rapids, Mich. Close – June 2009 (previously announced)
Indianapolis, Ind. Close – December 2011
Mansfield, Ohio Close – June 2010
Pontiac, Mich. Standby Capacity – December 2010
Powertrain
Livonia Engine, Mich. Close – June 2010
Flint North Components, Mich. Close – December 2010
Willow Run Site, Mich. Close – December 2010
Parma Components, Ohio Close – December 2010
Fredericksburg Components, Virg. Close – December 2010
Massena Castings, N.Y. ClosedMay 1, 2009 (previously announced)
Service & Parts Operations (SPO)
Warehousing & Parts Distribution Centers
Boston, Mass. Close – December 31, 2009
Jacksonville, Fla. Close – December 31, 2009
Columbus, Ohio Close – December 31, 2009

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