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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/06/2021 in all areas

  1. A 6.2 with very minor bolt on's on E85 is likely over the injector limit. The DI engines can handle a lot leaner air fuel ratio that port fuel injection but even so I'd want larger injectors if more than 100-125 horsepower was added. It would just come down to watching fuel pressure and your injector pulse width. 87 octane tends to show knock even without boost. It can be brought down with changing fueling and dropping timing but if you added boost it's just going to make that worse. If you go too low with the commanded air fuel ratio it will start to fuel knock. At a minimum I'd want to run mid grade 89 octane even on low boost levels, like sub 5 psi.
    2 points
  2. Thought I’d throw this out for you guys. I sent my ECM out to get the AFM/DOD delete. All went good with that. for what ever reason I decided to remove and clean all the carbon from the throttle body after success of new V8 power. ( it was horrible from almost 200,000 miles). After reinstalling and starting the engine the idle would never be the same, it was all over the place from 800-3000 with no rhyme or reason for a steady idle even after many idle relearn procedures, battery disconnects and test drives. I came across a video where the guy says to not clean the throttle body or you will have the exact issues I just described. I took the truck to a buddy who has a TECH 2 scan tool and 30 seconds later the truck idled perfect and better than ever. From what I been reading the throttle body gets carbon build up over time and the ECM compensates for this carbon, in my case 200K miles worth. After cleaning all that carbon out the throttle blade still remains in its “learned” position and this causes the crazy high idle. So, just an FYI if you decide to clean the carbon from the TB be prepared to have to deal with this. My guy charged me $40 to do the idle reset, the dealer where he works at would of been just over $100 ….
    1 point
  3. So I picked up a new project a few months ago, a 2006 2500HD LBZ Duramax with the 6 speed Allison. Truck has over 330k miles on it and needs a lot of work honestly, but I feel like I got it for a good price so I’m happy. Thankfully I can do the majority of work it needs myself.
    1 point
  4. Let me start by saying hey thanks for having me, new here. I will probably make a build thread for my 15 Silverado separately, but I felt like this discussion needs to happen. I want to preface this by saying that I am decently versed on the actual theory and thermo of the discussion as I am a current Engineering PhD student studying combustion. I do however lack the physical experience of boosted applications as well as engine tuning. The two topics to be discussed here are probably highly controversial and I am not looking to start a pissing contest about anything, but rather a tame discussion. Please let me know if I should split these into two separate posts, but these would be in the same build for me. 1. How much boost could I run, or power could I make, while running 87 octane. (5.3L "Eco-boost") And yes, I realize the disadvantages of 87 in regards to a boosted application, but if Ford can do it stock, I don't see why we couldn't do it aftermarket (and probably better tbh). But for reference, I am not actually looking for a high HP or drag type build. More a reliable DD that will be used for truck things like towing occasionally, but would like to get as much out of it as possible. (haven't even settled on it needing to be turbo) 2. Can the newer (2015) AFM/DOD be upgraded and/or tuned properly to be reliable and retain the intended advantages that were originally intended, with or without adding boost? Half of 5.3 is close to 2.7(eco-boost), so I don't see why I couldn't leverage the fuel economy of a turbo "4 cylinder" while having access to the full V8 when wanted.
    1 point
  5. Old fart here as I remember that very well also remember the antenna in the front fender that you had to pull it up out of the fender then push it back down in the fender if you didn't want to leave it up. Rich people cars had the auto electric up and down antennas
    1 point
  6. I was at my dealership today and they had three pairs in stock. I was able to swing a 10% discount and brought a set home with me. I hope to install them tonight and be done with the whining from my family about not being able to get in my truck.
    1 point
  7. 87 octane and a turbo? No. If you are trying to keep operational costs low, add a flex fuel sensor and tune it for 93 and E85. E85 will get you 87 octane prices and on top of that make some stout power. You are wasting your time trying to set it up for 87 octane. You "want to get as much out of it as possible" then you will need 91/93. AFM. Turn it off or physically delete it. 3.5 Ecoboost might be able to run 87 but it pulls some good power out of the tune doing so. 87 is "allowed" for cheap people aka fleets. Yes and no. All LT4s have the hardware. In Camaro ZL1, its turned off. C7 Z06 2015-2019 its active.
    1 point
  8. No offense but you just need to chunk all that out the window. Focus on the 2015 AFM. The driver though does not get to choose. The engine and PCM chooses. The lifters are controlled electronically but it is if they meet certain conditions so hypothetically yes you could edit the conditions. I have never heard of someone doing it though so I could not tell you. You are over thinking this. AFM delete, add turbo, done
    1 point
  9. Welcome to the site. First, make sure the Magnaride shocks are still present, and if so look for leaks. Second, make sure they have not "frozen" up, which will lead to a very harsh ride.
    1 point
  10. You would have to figure out how the AFM works on those. I think yes you could keep it but hell no would I want to and also you would have to figure out the tuning aspect. I only said no because of the tuning reason. Mechanically there is no problem I wouldn't think. But you really wouldn't be because you are no longer utilizing boost when in 4 cylinder mode. I think you might be thinking AFM comes on a lot more often then it actually does. 1. AFM comes on between 20-75 mph 2. AFM is based on throttle position, I can't actually remember what it is but it is low, like sub 30% low. Which means once you open up the throttle and allow the turbo to spool up you are already out of V4 mode and back into V8. So no more V4 turbo. 3. It deals with RPMs but don't know much about that one. Again you will never use the turbo in V4. My point is is that you are not going to actually use the turbo in V4 mode. And no the newer engines you cannot choose the amount of cylinders you want to use lol The lifters with AFM is a mechanical operation and NOT electronic.
    1 point
  11. It was a lot of work. Nothing real difficult but slow and steady was my plan. Don't get hurt and don't break anything. lol
    1 point
  12. This PDF has pretty good instructions for getting it all installed. Good luck. 2020 Silverado Dash Cam.pdf
    1 point
  13. So your thesis is that these motors aren't reliable without boost and they don't operate as intended by your brothers in engineering that designed these motor? Whew, you are off to a rough start... What is your source for this observation, a few threads on the internet you read? There are thousands of these motors with hundreds of thousands of miles on them. Follow the maintenance guideline and chances are very high you won't have an issue, but it is a mechanical unit assembled by robots and people, there can be the rogue issue that gets blown out of proportion or recently a supplier part issue. In terms of boosting, even though I am good with and a fan of AFM (it saves the V8 for a little longer) if I were boosting the motor I would be going for performance, and with that would want to do it right and would delete AFM. Partly because at that point I see no reason for having it on there when performance is my goal and second to make proper use of the added power I would have the valvetrain upgraded and a cam ground for it. I don't believe AFM was designed for boosted applications so as with any stock component that gets more power thrown to it I would want stronger upgraded parts. With that GM's new boosted motors have AFM on them (LT4 and the 2.7 turbo). Tyler
    1 point
  14. When the 14s first came out there was plenty of experimental tuners tinkering with the 5.3s. They were on this site. They all recommended using premium gas for maximum performance. KR was the reason. I have some experience with super chargers on my vehicles. All recommended premium fuel obviously. For the same reason the 6.2 recommended premium. It’s part of the tune.
    1 point
  15. Just basically on/off switch. I do not believe you can tune how/when it activates because it is more of a mechanical activation that the computer then reads. I also would suggest that you should just fully delete AFM as there is no real point in keeping it and you will gain more power without it. @CamGTPchime in please. You know more than I do.
    1 point
  16. Lol okay let me put some more thought into my explanation then. You are comparing apples to oranges with those engines. The tune for that Ecoboost is stupid safe, when on 87 octane. Low timing and low boost basically. BTW the ecoboost is recommended for 91 octane. Second of all let me roll my statement back. Sure you could get boost out of your V8 but the issue is your timing is going to be weak as hell. You also are going to make basically no power. Instead of getting say ~10hp per pound you are looking at like 3. It is just going to be not worth it. It's not that you can't it's just that it won't be worth it. And you won't be able to run high boost pressure either because of the crappy gas. The reason why I say no with AFM and boost is because I do not know a single tuner that would do that. I do not really know how AFM would react with boost. I assume it would be okay but the thing you might run into is that AFM just never activates. Your tune would just be incompatible unless you figured out a way to do it or found someone who knows how to tune boost+AFM
    1 point
  17. The thing with a CAI is that “ONE DOES NOT BUY IT FOR MPGs!!! You buy one for the performance side of things. That’s why you buy it plain and simple. I have seen nice gains with my S&B intake along with my Corsa Exhaust. Those who are in here constantly stating they don’t help (on performance side of things) are complete idiots! They choose to only b!tch about things and try to spat out a bunch of analytic garbage about air flow…blah,blah,blah Here’s my offer for all those haters. Take a stock GM truck, then take one that has a full Catback exhaust and CAI and line them up. See which one “PERFORMS” better. Oh wait, I have done this and mine performed better and I have seen 3 tenths sec better on that performance! Others have also shown numerical data as well. Hell, GM states you get an extra 15 hp from both, and their CAI is garbage compared to S&B or Roto-Fab in terms of air flow. As for the tunes, I am contemplating getting the Diablo hand held tune, just waiting on a time when I don’t need my truck for a good week because I don’t want to be stranded without a vehicle if shipping is late, because there is no way you are getting the ECU back in 1 day like they claim.
    1 point
  18. No idea what the market is like in your area, but last week I traded my 2020 Sierra 1500 X31 with 16k miles for a 2020 2500HD Silverado and got $48k on the trade for my truck... they have it listed on their site for $54k now. I had an offer of 49k from another dealer but their truck was 6k more than the one I found so not a bad deal. Basically I drove the truck for a year and 16k miles and it cost me $1500 total based of what I paid for it. No break in advice though, since my "new" truck was used.
    1 point
  19. Sorry for late reply, and thank you! See this picture of my Regular cab Trail Boss I hope you like I also have more in my Instagram account @Sveew.media
    1 point
  20. There’s room to work within the stock tune. GM themselves give you an extra 13 hp with their catback, no tune needed. Safe to say you can improve on the front end of that as well. I ran the Roto-Fab for a few years, it did great. Never any check engine lights or other issues. I bought it for the look and sound first, but I did measure improvements with my Dragy as well. Unfortunately the same few people here are far too exhausting to argue with. If you’re bored with the truck and want to add an intake system, do it. If not, that’s cool too.
    1 point
  21. Got some decent photos of my TB after getting the SST installed as well as new rims and tires. Absolutely love this truck!
    1 point
  22. I don't know if anyone here has a real world review, but I did find this: https://trucktirereviews.com/michelin-agilis-crossclimate-review/
    1 point
  23. I went with the Morimoto XB headlights, replacing my stock HIDs. It ain't cheap ($1500) but I'm happy with it. Install was a bear getting the stock trim off the stock head lights and transferring it to the XBs.
    1 point
  24. Never mind I found it. right under the glove box take the lower dash panel off four 7mm screws. very easy to get to ,(2) t15 torx bit screws. 15 minute job.
    1 point
  25. I ordered a 2022 Silverado 2500HD Custom on August 15th. I selected essentially every package that is available on the Custom. It was built the week of September 27th and was delivered October 4th.
    1 point
  26. Bad battery cables and or bad battery cable fuse block. #18-NA-161: Steering Jerks Or Kicks Back / Reduced Power Steering Assist / Engine Stall / No Start / Service Stabilitrak / IPC / Radio / HVAC Goes Blank Various DTCs - (Jun 23, 2021) Involved Region or Country North America, Europe, Russia, Middle East, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Japan, South Korea, China and Thailand. Condition Important: For 2014 Vehicles please check VIN status per Safety recall 17276. Execute denoted action if VIN status is “open”. Important: For 2015 Vehicles please check VIN status per Safety recall 18289. Execute denoted action if VIN status is “open”. Note: If there are steering related complaints related to this bulletin, please review bulletin 17-NA-345, PIT5457 and 20–NA-113. Some customers may comment on one or more of the following conditions: Reduced or loss of power steering assist (only LD models equipped with electric power steering) Steering wheel jerks or kicks back when turning Service Stabilitrak message with warning chime Engine stall IPC going blank or inoperative Radio/ICS going blank HVAC going blank Hood ajar message and/or dome lamps flash when shifting into reverse Alarm sounds when locking doors or door locks cycling Wipers continue to run for a short time after turning off and then stop/park in the incorrect location Important: Record history and current codes from all modules before clearing to aid in diagnostics. Some technicians may find one or more of the following DTC’s set: B1325, B124B, B124C, B127B, B127E, C0544, C0710, C0800, P0513, U0020, U0073, U0077, U0078, U0100, U0101, U0102, U0121, U0126, U0131, U0140, U0155, U0164, U0415, U0422, U0428, U0452, U1509, U150F and/or U15E1 Note: The following causes listed below, may cause the battery to discharge. Cause 1 This condition may be caused by battery cables with high resistance and/or loose connections at the: Positive or negative battery cables Battery fuse block Cause 2 This condition may be caused by a poor BCM ground at G218. Cause 3 This condition may be caused by a shorted B+ Battery cable (3) at the Starter Solenoid caused by: A loose starter shield contacting the starter battery cable terminal ring. A starter cable ring terminal that has been mis-installed and/or rotated when installed on the starter solenoid. Cause 4 This condition may be caused by a discharged or faulty battery. Correction 1 Note: If no loss of power component or interface is detected, consider changing out both the negative cable and BDU cable and torque appropriately Important: The following steps must be completed in order. Grasping or attempting to rotate cables could affect readings and should be done after performing the voltage drop measurement. Note: When checking voltage drop, the voltage drop should be performed with the fuel system disabled (or hold the accelerator WOT) and while cranking the engine. MIN/MAX on the Digital Multi Meter (DMM) should NOT be used. The voltage drop should be monitored at a STEADY crank. Inspect for any high resistance and/or loose connections at both the battery fuse block and the positive or negative battery cables. Perform a loaded voltage drop test on the short positive battery cable (1). Refer to “Measuring Voltage Drop” in SI. If the voltage drop is above 100 mV, replace the affected cable(s). For positive cable parts information, refer to the Parts Information section. Perform a loaded voltage drop test on the negative battery cable (2). Refer to “Measuring Voltage Drop” in SI. If the voltage drop is above 200 mV, replace the affected cable. For negative cable parts information, refer to the Electronic Parts Catalog (EPC). It is imperative that both the positive and negative battery top posts protrude above the battery cable clamps 1-2 mm (0.040 - 0.080 in) to be properly installed, as shown (3). Check both the positive and negative battery cable clamp nuts and make sure they are properly tightened to 7 Nm (62 lb in). After the positive and negative battery cables are fully installed and tightened to 7 Nm (62 lb in), grasp each battery cable near the battery post and make sure they are secure and that they do not spin on the post. If they spin, replace the battery cable. For positive cable parts information, refer to the Parts Information section. For negative cable parts information, refer to the Electronic Parts Catalog (EPC). Inspect the battery fuse block cable connections for being lose by grasping each cable near the eyelet and verify they do not rotate on their respective stud. Verify each nut is torqued properly to 15 Nm (11 ft lb). Inspect the negative battery cable where it connects to the engine block and make sure it is not lose by grasping the cable near the eyelet and verify it does not rotate. Verify the cable nut is torqued properly to 45 Nm (33 ft lb). Correction 2 Note: If no loss of power component or interface is detected, consider changing out both the negative cable and BDU cable and torque appropriately Inspect G218 (applies LD Trucks and SUVs built prior to June 2015): Check for the nut being loose or cross threaded (1), repair and tighten as necessary. Check for the front of dash insulator mat (2) being trapped between the ground eyelet and the body/stud as shown. If the dash insulator mat is trapped, cut the mat away from the ground stud so it will no longer interfere. Reinstall the ground eyelet, the nut, and retighten. Correction 3 Inspect the starter solenoid B+ battery cable for possible contact at the starter heat shield (1) or a loose shield resting on terminal. If the battery cable is shorting out on the starter heat shield, replace the B+ battery cable and starter heat shield. After installing the new starter heat shield and B+ battery cable, ensure there is adequate clearance and each fastener is torqued properly so it will no longer short out. Correction 4 Perform the "Battery Inspection/Test" procedure in SI, using the GR8, and replace the battery if it fails the test. Technicians must attach the GR8 test print out with a Battery Replace decision, that includes the Warranty Code, to the repair order.
    1 point
  27. In Texas on pipelines or utility lines. Or anyone working outside. I Alabama, Florida etc in the summer or northern states in the winter. Long idle time is the rule not at al unusual. I would often when I was working. Start my truck drive up to 100 miles to the job sites. Where’s its 80 degrees in the morning with high humidity. Never shut off my truck all day. Most construction, welder rigs, road crews. Probably most outside working people who use their trucks as intended, for work. Extended idle times is pretty normal.
    1 point
  28. Obviously haven't seen yours to say what it does or doesn't need. But usually Driver's side beams are intentionally lower to not blind oncoming Drivers as much. (At least in the US anyway with right lane driving.) Mine hasn't been replaced and is slightly lower than the Passenger side.
    1 point
  29. Post 8000 is a 231,000 mile update. Need to change the oil next week. She is still plugging along!
    1 point
  30. I installed a missile launcher in the bed of my truck. That space on the dash is where I put the launch button. I then tried selling my truck to the military for use in Afghanistan, but they decided to pull out faster than a teenage boy on prom night not wanting to get his date pregnant.
    1 point
  31. Really? It was a big selling point, but you did zero research on it? Good thing the truck was only, what $50+K. Maybe you can claim the salesman tricked you into buying the truck by showing you how powerful the outlet was by plugging in an electric shaver, and return the truck...
    1 point
  32. I know this is an old post but just wanted to let whoever is looking to get 295/60R20 ridge grapplers, I had them test fit on my 2015 sierra stock rims with a 2.5” lift today. The front had plenty of room at full lock but the rear of fenderwell would need the Norcal mod. Even tried with a 1.5” spacer(I know not recommend) just to see.
    1 point
  33. Whip antenna is better at receiving the wavelengths used for am/fm. (and a long one works better than a stubby)
    1 point
  34. Welcome to the forum! PLEASE post pictures of your regular cab Trailboss! The shark fin antenna is for Onstar, digital radio, telephone and possibly GPS nav? I know the compass gets it's signal from the shark fin as well. Others will correct me where I am wrong. GM claims that it is not great for radio reception, therefore they still have a whip antenna (by the window) for our radios. I do know when my 2014 had issues with the compass not reading correctly, I pulled the shark fin antenna and it had suffered water intrusion. $40 later, I had bought a new antenna and installed it. Compass heading was correct.
    1 point
  35. I am in the right thread, most on this thread are talking 2019-2020 issues with 5:3 and 6.2 with 10 spd
    1 point
  36. 10/20/2020 Alignment. Two months after the new tires and toe adjustment and sourcing new camber/caster extended range cams AND finding a place in Deegan's busy schedule we have it. If it looks familiar it's a dead copy of the specs I gave him to hit from the best of the earliest of four previous alignments Pepper has had. When there last the adjusters had frozen solid and he hit them with creep oil but.......now that he had kits in hand...the creep oil did it's job and they were not needed. Patients....patients. It drives nice....real nice. We are going to check it again at the next full services. The toe seems to want to creep. No obvious reason. Well....other than Illinois roads. ? Printer was not working for the previous 'before' but we took a bit more than 1/2 degree from the castor. It isn't moving. The truck is settling. Frame rake directly translates to castor inclination degree for degree. Think about it. It will come to you.........
    1 point
  37. I'm pulling the original set of Bridgestone HT's off my truck as soon as the replacements show up. This set has 125,000 miles on them with 25% of the useful tread left. She goes down the road with my hands off the wheel like auto pilot for what is an uncomfortable distance for my passengers. The truck is leveled by lowering. When I got the truck the factory alignment was awful. My castor was actually out of spec high. Notice the total toe is in spec but not centered? It had a mild pull toward the ditch and a twitch. Hit expansion joints like a jack hammer. A lot of castor will do that. Thrust angle was high. This drags the tire sideways as you go down the road. High wear. My rear axle was not square in the chassis. We corrected that too. When were done. (printer wasn't working that day so photo on my phone). Centered. Thrust angle was 0.08* This alignment calmed the pull and twitch, took some shock out of the hits and added almost 3 mpg to the averages. I can't answer you last question in your case but I point you to a video that can help you understand it Watch the interplay between scrub radius and castor and camber. Watch the second video too. It a real eye opener when it comes to changing one thing changes a bunch of things. Just sit tight and it will start in sequence.
    1 point
  38. Some observations on the alignment. There should never be more than a quarter degree difference in castor between sides nor camber between sides. Drivers side castor and camber track well if 1/4 degree more positive that the passenger side. Caster is flipped on this sheet. This helps neutralize the crown in the road wanting to pull the vehicle up the crown. Spec for everything is no where near centered. 3 degrees castor IS mid spec. A half degree is huge. Explain later. Toe setting should never ever differ from side to side with thrust angles zero or at least under 0.1 degrees thrust. You have a quarter degree thrust angle. Dog tracking and the toe trying to equalize. Twitchy. I have never seen an alignment spec where the ranges we identical left/right. Odd. Then again I haven't seen it all I'm sure. Okay on some race cars we use to stagger the wheel base a bit and run even numbers. You have a lift and a wider tire. There is a thing called scrub radius. A line from the upper ball joint through the lower ball joint should intersect the ground at the middle of the tires contact patch when she is sitting on the ground. The lift and I would expect different wheel off set has moved this point. That alone will make them twitchy. Okay when you get a load and the truck squats the caster will increase by exactly the change in frame angle. This will pull the camber more negative and increase the positive toe. Toe is near the limit now that is why we center our specs. Okay. Listen up. If you think I'm full of crap just ignore me and put the torch away. Have a safe trip. Hope it works out for you.
    1 point
  39. Don’t you understand one of the purposes of the internet is to give people a platform to complain about things that they don’t understand?
    1 point
  40. Stock truck. Tire size is listed on the door jamb.
    1 point
  41. From a previous post: Curious to see what your guy's wheel and tire combo weigh... I have some heavy stock clad 20's from the factory. 275 55 20 Good year Wrangler LS-2 tires put them on the scale the other day and they weighed 76 lbs each. Factory 17" aluminum with stock Goodyear Wrangler AT/S tires 62 lbs. Factory 18" Z71 aluminum with stock Goodyear Wrangler SRA tires 64 lbs.
    1 point
  42. Ok, so you've had these tires on your truck for 16 months and you're only now noticing the change in ride? And you've only put 1000 miles on the truck in that time? And you had no way of accurately measuring your tire pressure until you finally bought an accurate gauge? The tires you have get a 9.4 rating on ride quality, from 277 submissions covering over 5 million miles of driving. The Duratracs on my truck, which I love and I think the ride is very good, get only an 8.3 out of 739 submissions and over 13 million miles. Sorry man, given the facts at hand, I'd say the problem is you, not the tires. PS - yes, I would recommend airing them down to 30 to see how that affects the ride. I would also do the chalk test to make sure you won't cause abnormal wear.
    1 point
  43. Wheels came off soon after I bought the truck with about 20k on it. Been sitting in garage ever since. Lug nuts, covers and tpms included. Goodyear Wrangler AT/S 265/70 17 with alot of tread. Located near Harrisburg PA. Pickup only. $600 obo
    1 point
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