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Found 6 results

  1. Hi all, I haven't posted too many times in the forum... but I have found another question and would like to hear some opinions. I am in the market for a new travel trailer. I have found the newer models are significantly lighter than my current camper. I am currently pulling a 32' travel trailer that weighs in (on the scale) just over 7,000lbs. Being an older trailer, I just don't think it hauls well... (and I will be honest, I have it a little nose down- my mistake when setting up the WDH.) I hate driving this on the highway, I prefer slower state roads that don't face big rigs passing by, winds that blow you around, and generally just feel more in control on them. On the highway, I feel I need to drive slower 55-60 and still keep a hand on the trailer brake. I have also noticed on newer campers they have begun spreading the axels a little farther apart (more stable?). I am trying to figure out if I need to step down in both weight and length to get a better towing experience, or simply lowering the weight (and correct WDH setup) will improve the tow-ability... Will a light but long trailer get blown all over the road? My truck details are copied below from another post; I am well within weight limits for my truck (@7,700lbs). I would like to be able to travel at normal highway speeds- 70-75) and feel comfortable... The hard part is finding a camper with the features we (my wife) wants that will tow comfortably. Suggestions are welcome here too! Bunk Beds, One or Two entry (if one it cannot be next to bunks), sofa, slide out for floor space, queen bed separated by wall... thats not too much to ask is it? (jk- its tough to find without hitting 30'+) If a manufacturer would just make a model with a sofa instead of a slide out dinette we would be sold! *2012 GMC Sierra 1500. Specs on the truck include; 4x4, crew cab, max trailer package (5.3 KDL HD Cooling Package, trailer brake harness, 3.42 ratio). I have installed the Tekonsha P3 brake controller. I currently have the Camco Recurve R6 hitch for sway and WD. The truck manual max trailer weight states 9,500lbs with a GCWR of 15,000lbs (truck GVWR 7,000lbs). I do understand the balancing required between truck and trailer for GCWR; if truck fully loaded is 5,500lbs and tongue weight is 1,000 pounds the max trailer becomes 8,500 pounds not the book stated 9,500. I am thinking a 7,700lbs GVWR for a trailer will fall WELL within specs. I also plan to add SumoSprings to my truck later this spring- and possibly stronger tires on the truck for towing...
  2. 2014 Sierra SLT, Bilstein level with 5100s all around, 33" tires. I was carrying some flooring and couple cabinets yesterday and again i noticed how nice the ride was with some weight in the back. My ride is already better with 5100s but it rides better with weight. Has anyone tried carrying 2 sandbags, maybe 200lb total for an extended period of time, wondering about gas mileage. Imagining it cant hurt it that bad. Whats your experience?
  3. John Goreham Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com 6-5-2017 At a recent New England Motor Press Association (NEMPA) annual meeting at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a representative from General Motors went deep on the topic of lightweighting. Charlie Klein, Executive Director, Global CO2 Strategy, Mass and Aerodynamics, for General Motors, wowed the group by pointing to steel, not necessarily aluminum, as a very common solution to adding lightness to vehicles. Although magnesium, composite plastics, and aluminum do play a significant role in modern automotive design, more and more advanced steel is the go-to solution for reducing mass cost effectively, while still maintaining platform rigidity and safety. As the top of page chart highlights, General Motors has taken out hundreds of pounds of mass on every one of its popular models over the past vehicle generation. What Mr. Klein emphasized was that GM did this while steering straight into "headwinds" of increased safety requirements, infotainment and active safety electronics weight additions, and ever-increasing customer expectations of greater rigidity (which is felt by the driver as a premium feel on the road). Among the technologies that GM has invented and patented in the past decade, the one that most impressed the group was GM's ability to spot-weld steel to aluminum. The group immediately had questions on how corrosion of the dissimilar metals was managed, but Klein assured the group it was part of the process and is now in production on the CT6. Klein also showed how GM is making structural body segments (beneath the skin) more cost effectively, lighter, and more rigid by reducing parts. Kelin's example was the rear support section behind the rear wheel well. On the ATS that section has a dozen or more components. On the CT6, it is a single piece.
  4. John Goreham Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com 5-22-2017 Chevy announced today that the all-new Equinox will be 10% lighter than the outgoing model. The new design sheds an incredible 400 pounds compared to the previous generation. In automotive design that is an insane amount of weight to be cut. The way GM did it was by starting with a fresh sheet of paper. The new Equinox is much more in the style of the Mazda CX-5, Subaru Forester, and other mainstream compact crossovers than the vehicle it is replacing, which was bigger in legroom and cargo area, but just a smidge. The real savings came from aa new platform and by using more high-strength steel. GM says the new Equinox, " ...body structure design was optimized with a mixed-material strategy for strength and low weight. More than 80 percent of the Equinox’s body structure is composed of high-grade steel materials, with high-strength steel comprising nearly 20 percent." The benefits of lighter weight are better handling and lower fuel consumption. We have not driven a new Equinox yet. GM has not put any in our media fleet. However, we can comment on the fuel economy. We checked out the stats at the EPA's site for the old and new Equinox and the fuel economy gains are impressive. For example, the outgoing 2.5-liter AWD Equinox had an EPA-estimated Combined rating of 23 MPG. The new, 2-liter turbocharged Equinox has a 24 MPG rating. Much more power with a measurable fuel efficiency improvement. A better and more impressive comparison of the old base model is to the new 1.5-liter turbo, which earns a 26 MPG rating with AWD. We could not help but check out the fuel economy of the segment leading CR-V while at the site. The bad news for GM is that the Honda earns a 29 MPG rating when equipped with its 1.5-liter turbocharged engine. 3 MPG is a big delta when comparing crossovers of this type.
  5. Newer user to this forum, though I have been on others in the past... I am getting different opinions from different family and friends- many seem to contradict each other. So I thought I would ask this community for thoughts. The wife and I have recently purchased, used from friends, a new camper. The camper is a 30 foot Coachman Catalina (1997). The book weight of this trailer says 5,100lbs and includes trailer brakes. I am planning to haul with my 2012 GMC Sierra 1500. Specs on the truck include; 4x4, crew cab, max trailer package (5.3 KDL HD Cooling Package, trailer brake harness, 3.42 ratio). I have installed the Tekonsha P3 brake controller and am planning to use a weight distributing hitch with sway control. I am currently leaning toward the Camco Recurve R6 hitch to meet both these needs (receiver hitch is rated to 1,100lbs with WD hitch). The truck manual max trailer weight states 9,500lbs with a GCWR of 15,000lbs (truck GVWR 7,000lbs). I do understand the balancing required between truck and trailer for GCWR; if truck fully loaded is 5,500lbs and tongue weight is 1,000 pounds the max trailer becomes 8,500 pounds not the book stated 9,500. So, with this info I have some friends stating that this will fall well within the limits of the truck. And others stating that I need at minimum a 3/4 ton truck to haul this camper. Based on the info I have been able to collect I feel like I should be just fine with this trailer and truck combination... Yes it will be heavy, but not reaching the max weights- or even coming close (I am estimating 7,000lbs trailer fully loaded). And with trailer brakes and a quality proportional brake control I feel confident in stopping power. *I guess my analogy/thought is this; if I am mowing a 1/4 acre lawn, sure a riding mower would be great, but a push mower will get the job done just fine and without any difficulty. Am I right in thinking that while a 3/4 ton truck would be easier, my 1/2 ton will get the job done just fine?
  6. Looking for some assistance. Buying a travel trailer early next year and trying to figure out if I'll be able to / want to pull it with my current truck. I commute 70+ miles per day for work and would prefer to stick with a half ton, but will go bigger if safety dictates it. Below is the info on the trailer and truck. I've looked at all the towing calculators and from what I can tell, I'm cutting it pretty close on payload, given 10-13% hitch weight. Any help, second set of eyes on the numbers is appreciated! Thanks! Trailer Specs: GVWR (wet weight): 7840 (includes water, propane, and 1444 cargo capacity) Unloaded weight (dry weight): 5880 26ft Truck: 2014 Silverado Double Cab 4x4 5.3l V8 3.42 Axle Max Trailer Weight - 9600 Gcwr: 15000 Truck specs from door jam: Gvwr: 7200 Gvw/ Sticker weight: 5201 Payload: 1974 Fgawr: 3950 Rgwar: 3950
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