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Tankless water heaters


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looking to see what anyone knows about installing these? i have an electric 30 gallon, my pops just put in a tankless and likes it, and i'd look forward to saving a lot on the electric bill (already have gas running to the area of the water heater)

 

my question for anyone know knows about these is:

1.) can i tap the exhaust output of the tankless into the furnace's exhaust chute?

 

2.) my father's tankless is "high efficiency" and has a condensation tube which drips into the sump pump, i dont have a sump (sand crawl space) and the water heater is in the garage anyway.

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Interesting. I haven't seen these before. How does it work without a tank?

 

Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX using Xparent Red Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I installed a tankless and we love it. Never run out of hot water.Our electric bill dropped $20 a month. You can if you run out of gas to supply it. Our water heater was in a closet in our girls bedroom. It was nice to free up some space. I mounted the unit on the outside of the house, which was only six feet from where the electric heater was installed. I don't see why you can't run the exhaust into your existing exhaust. Not like there is much in the way of major smoke or anything. As for the condensation tube, not familiar with that since ours doesn't have one, I guess because it is outside. Ours is a Rinnai unit. Make sure if you get one you get it big enough to be able to handle some one taking a shower and you wanting to do the dishes or do laundry as well as for being able to run two showers at the same time. We can with no issues.

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I was looking into replacing an electric water heater with a tankless (4 water heaters in less than 10 years) until a noticed the power requirements; 3 60 amp two poles breakers. I would need to upgrade to 400 amp service.

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The simple answer is NO! A tankless whole home water heater with condensing combustion runs at almost 200,000 BTUs which is about double that of your furnace. It usually requies a 4" B vent or 3" high temp PVC vent and a 3" inlet. You can combine the combustion the inlets for both though. The condensation tube must go somewhere that it will not freeze and plug.

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I replaced a 40-gallon LP tank four years ago with a Rheem tankless and have been, for the most part, happy with the result. It's just my wife and I living in our house, so I thought it good to not pay to keep 40 gallons of water hot all day long (and all night long) just so we could use it for a while in the morning and then a while in the evening. Less a problem on weekends when most laundry is done, etc. But since we're on propane and not natural gas, the savings was significant. I'm guessing we save at least $100/year compared to having a tank. But the best part is limitless hot water (at least as long as the propane tank holds out). My wife has very thick, long hair and by the time she got her hair washed and rinsed she was running out of hot water. She also has a whirlpool tub that she couldn't fill with hot water; the tank would run out before she got it filled! No longer a problem with the tankless heater. I happen to have a pretty good situation for installation since my utility closet is inside the house and has an exterior wall. I mounted the water heater on the exterior wall so the exhaust runs up about 18-inches, turns 90 degrees and goes throught the wall horizontally (with a slight downward slope for condensation to drain outside).

 

I say happy for the most part because the first one I installed malfunctioned about 18 months after installation. Rheem was pretty good about trying to fix it but eventually replaced it under warranty. Good thing, though, is I got a newer, better model (since the one I had was no longer being produced) for FREE. They shipped it to me FedEx overnight and that unit has been working great for almost three years now.

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dwgr,sounds to me you have hard water if you went through that many water heaters in 10 years. Are you buying good heaters or cheap ones? Cheap heaters only last a few years. Maybe you need to step up to a 60-80 gallon tank with the glass lined inner tank. As for tankless I know some people that have them and they tell me there a little noisy and some hear the fan running.

 

You might not be heating the water until its used in a tankless heater but they suck the juice when in use.

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The simple answer is NO! A tankless whole home water heater with condensing combustion runs at almost 200,000 BTUs which is about double that of your furnace. It usually requies a 4" B vent or 3" high temp PVC vent and a 3" inlet. You can combine the combustion the inlets for both though. The condensation tube must go somewhere that it will not freeze and plug.

i have seen a couple which dont have the condensing combustion, my father just purchased one which condenses but he has it set up right next to his sump. i wasnt sure if anyone had any ideas on IF i purchased a condensing one (since theyre supposed to be higher efficiency) where to run the condensation to?

 

thanks everyone else for your input, its just me and my soon-to-be-fiance and we're paying about 130/month for electric since everything (except the furnace) is electric. I plan on switching everything to gas, and figured the water heater has to warm the water despite anyone even using it, so that might be a good otipon to swap out first.

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dwgr,sounds to me you have hard water if you went through that many water heaters in 10 years. Are you buying good heaters or cheap ones? Cheap heaters only last a few years. Maybe you need to step up to a 60-80 gallon tank with the glass lined inner tank. As for tankless I know some people that have them and they tell me there a little noisy and some hear the fan running.

 

You might not be heating the water until its used in a tankless heater but they suck the juice when in use.

 

it's gonna be a gas powered one. the couple ive seen/heard make next to no noise

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i have seen a couple which dont have the condensing combustion, my father just purchased one which condenses but he has it set up right next to his sump. i wasnt sure if anyone had any ideas on IF i purchased a condensing one (since theyre supposed to be higher efficiency) where to run the condensation to?

 

thanks everyone else for your input, its just me and my soon-to-be-fiance and we're paying about 130/month for electric since everything (except the furnace) is electric. I plan on switching everything to gas, and figured the water heater has to warm the water despite anyone even using it, so that might be a good otipon to swap out first.

 

Well another thing to throw out there is the price of a gas unit which is more money then a electric. Gas units are around $800- 1400 for a good one and electric units I seen are from $500-1100 now say it saves you $10 a month so that's 8-10 years before the unit pays for itself and by the time that hits you will most likely need another one. Something to think about.

 

Most new tank water heaters are a lot more efficient then they use to be.

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Well another thing to throw out there is the price of a gas unit which is more money then a electric. Gas units are around $800- 1400 for a good one and electric units I seen are from $500-1100 now say it saves you $10 a month so that's 8-10 years before the unit pays for itself and by the time that hits you will most likely need another one. Something to think about.

 

Most new tank water heaters are a lot more efficient then they use to be.

 

part of the reason i want to get a tankless is because the water heater is in the garage, this is the first winter we spent in our house and i found out how cold it really gets in there which makes me realize water heater not only has to keep the water warm all day, but has to combat the garage being like 40-50 degrees lol. our gas bill is pretty cheap and we already have a gas line running to the area (gf's father is friends with someone from NJNG who owed him a favor, have gas lines running to every appliance we want to replace) so its not like i have to do anything too difficult.

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Keep a few things in mind:

  1. The gas line for a whole house tankless heater normally needs ~ 3/4", vs 1/2" for a tank.
  2. The exhaust is very hot, and cannot be vented through existing ducts from a tank model.
  3. You really need to be able to vent through the wall, and you need clearance to all combustibles @ the exit. You cannot vent under a deck, etc.
  4. When the power goes off, you have zero hot water.
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Keep a few things in mind:

  1. The gas line for a whole house tankless heater normally needs ~ 3/4", vs 1/2" for a tank.
  2. The exhaust is very hot, and cannot be vented through existing ducts from a tank model.
  3. You really need to be able to vent through the wall, and you need clearance to all combustibles @ the exit. You cannot vent under a deck, etc.
  4. When the power goes off, you have zero hot water.

 

i believe the 3/4" gas running to it already, if not thats not a huge deal, it comes in, directly to the furnace which is right next to the water heater. and i know they use a special pvc for most tankless exhausts, i have an option of running it into the attic, then out the side of the house. and i know about the no hot water, but i can deal with that. most current tank heaters have some digital stuff that makes it turn off when no power, and wont accept "dirty" power like from a generator i'm told.

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