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Tire weight and mpg. 10 ply vs. 4 ply


govener71
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I've been looking for a while and now just want to know some opinions. I bought my truck, 06 silverado crew 5.3 vin z 3.42 g80 rear end, with 285/70/17 bfg AT's. my mpg is about 15. Those are e range tires and 60 pounds each just in rubber according to tire rack. I don't tow much if at all in a year, I hunt but nothing crazy. D you see it being a good switch going to a 4 ply it the same size? Their weight is only about 46 pounds a tire. Bfg rugged terrain or terra grapplers. I'm thinking I would gain mpg back and some hp with such a big difference in weight. Thoughts?

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The size matters, the weight really doesn't. I switched to 10 ply and my mpg didn't drop. If you want better mileage you have to go back to stock size. If you do the math the weight of the tire doesn't matter much.

Edited by kstruckcountry
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I run a P series BFG Rugged Terrain on my truck. I realized that I didnt need anything more than this as I don't tow anything over 4000 pounds. Just make sure that you buy a tire that suits your needs.

 

A 10 ply will ride rougher than a 6 or 4 ply tire.

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My thought is that it's 60 lbs less to get rolling and gain hp back , 30 lbs in the back, at the rear wheels. Just like a tune where more unused hp will gain you some mpg back thought my summer tires might do the same. I do have stock winter tires but these are more for looks in the summer.

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Dyno results are one thing, real world is another. You aren't going to be able to speed up your wheels as fast in the real world as you do on a dyno. Not to mention you're comparing a few pounds rotating to a ~6000 pound pickup moving in a straight line.

 

More importantly, in the case of MPG your wheels are turning at a constant speed most of the time, meaning that the torque needed to keep the weight of the tire itself turning is 0.

 

However, with an increase in tire height, both acceleration and required torque to move at a constant speed are affected (T=F x r).

 

Sorry, I had to. :lol:

Edited by kstruckcountry
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