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cat320

6.0 gas engine

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Honestly, the proven platform of the 6.0 is why I got it.

 

Sure they could go 6.2 but then I don't want to be forced to use premium. Could add direct injection but read about those who have carbon build up. Could add twin turbos but then i see puffs of black smoke when those ecoboosts stomp on gas and hear about gas in their oil. Could do the AFM but hate that my wife's 2014 suburban burns about a qt of oil.....

 

So...... I like the proven platform. don't think they have the new technology proven yet for trucks that really work.

 

I have a long term wager with myself that after 250k miles I will have less in maintenance that fuel cost for all that new fangled stuff. Who knows...

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Premium only makes any motor not even worth considering to me. I hate being locked into one fuel, and the most expensive one at that. I have grown very fond of flex fuel motors, and the 6.0L in my 2015 is flex fuel. Fuel prices for various gas/ethanol blends change all the time, usually seasonally, and it is nice to switch to another blend of fuel when the pricing is right. I can use E0, E10, E15, E20, E30, E85, all which are available in my area. Right now it is drinking E85. Sure, the mpg is lower, but the price is significantly lower than E10 (which is 20 cents a gallon cheaper than ethanol free), that even with the lower mpg of E85, I am saving just under 2 cents a mile. The lower mpg number is a belly drop, but it is the cost per mile that means everything.

 

I am averaging right now, 12.1 for all miles on E85. Price is $1.72 a gallon. That equates to a hair over 14 cents a mile for fuel. on Premium pricing, $2.51 in my area, the pickup would have to be averaging for all miles, 18-19 mpg, just to break even with that. I find it hard to believe, that the 6.2L would get that kind of everyday average mpg moving a 2500HD around. Maybe a 1500, but that is a apples to oranges comparison to a 2500HD. Still waiting for someone to load up 1000 lb in a 1500 6.2L to more closely match a 2500HD and drive it around for a few months and show what the mpg is. On E10, my pickup averages around 14 mpg for all miles. At current E10 pricing in my area, that equates to about 15.5 cents a mile. The E85, at the current price beats that by over 1 cent a mile in fuel cost. As prices change seasonally, I then move on to the fuel that offers the best value at the time.

 

True, I don't tow 10,000 lb every other day as some do. If I was frequently pulling heavy, I would've gotten a Dmax. I mostly haul heavy frequently with only some lighter towing occasionally. And a 6.0L does just fine for that.

 

I think it is a safe wager that your overall lifetime costs will be lower with the 6.0L.

Edited by Cowpie
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Premium only makes any motor not even worth considering to me. I hate being locked into one fuel, and the most expensive one at that. I have grown very fond of flex fuel motors, and the 6.0L in my 2015 is flex fuel. Fuel prices for various gas/ethanol blends change all the time, usually seasonally, and it is nice to switch to another blend of fuel when the pricing is right. I can use E0, E10, E15, E20, E30, E85, all which are available in my area. Right now it is drinking E85. Sure, the mpg is lower, but the price is significantly lower than E10 (which is 20 cents a gallon cheaper than ethanol free), that even with the lower mpg of E85, I am saving just under 2 cents a mile. The lower mpg number is a belly drop, but it is the cost per mile that means everything.

 

I am averaging right now, 12.1 for all miles on E85. Price is $1.72 a gallon. That equates to a hair over 14 cents a mile for fuel. on Premium pricing, $2.51 in my area, the pickup would have to be averaging for all miles, 18-19 mpg, just to break even with that. I find it hard to believe, that the 6.2L would get that kind of everyday average mpg moving a 2500HD around. Maybe a 1500, but that is a apples to oranges comparison to a 2500HD. Still waiting for someone to load up 1000 lb in a 1500 6.2L to more closely match a 2500HD and drive it around for a few months and show what the mpg is. On E10, my pickup averages around 14 mpg for all miles. At current E10 pricing in my area, that equates to about 15.5 cents a mile. The E85, at the current price beats that by over 1 cent a mile in fuel cost. As prices change seasonally, I then move on to the fuel that offers the best value at the time.

 

True, I don't tow 10,000 lb every other day as some do. If I was frequently pulling heavy, I would've gotten a Dmax. I mostly haul heavy frequently with only some lighter towing occasionally. And a 6.0L does just fine for that.

 

I think it is a safe wager that your overall lifetime costs will be lower with the 6.0L.

First off, I have no dog in this fight just making a couple statements here per your question. I'm running a 14 1500 4x4 cc with the 6.2. With the stock 20" tires I was keeping a close eye on my mileage, and gas type. 87vs 93 (premium recommended) but not necessary. The extra mpg made it a wash, therefore I've always ran premium, the truck performs better with it also. I took a 3,000 mile round trip from Florida to NY, highway plus some around town stuff. My overall average was 22.5 mpg for the 3,000 mile trip. My highest 50 mile average was 26, that was in Pennsylvania. For some reason I was getting better mileage up north than in Florida. Around town I was averaging 16-18, and am always carrying an extra 1,000lbs in the truck, my toolbox, and tools.

I got tired of the intermittent vibe thing, and got stuck on a job site in sugar sand with my stock "p rated" car tires, and decided to go to a better "lt" all terrain "truck" tire. Lifted it 4", and went to 305/55/20, my around town average now is 14, haven't taken a road trip, so not sure on highway.

Some people say, on a $60,000 truck why so critical, and watch mileage, for me its part of doing business, and curiosity I suppose. I do let the truck idle a bit more than I would like in the summer with the a/c going, and now am considering going 2500, and diesel. That's why I'm snooping here. :)

 

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

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When one is doing things for business every penny counts. And fuel economy we can get out of a vehicle is paramount for some of us. While some poo poo the idea of even worrying about fuel economy out of a $60K truck, try thinking that way with a $140K truck that drinks 20,000+ gallons of diesel a year. Just a simple tenth of a mpg increase nets a $600 per year savings in fuel. A full mpg improvement, well, you can see the benefit. While I do have a 2500HD and I know it is going to be a gas guzzler, I still try to get the most out of each gallon, and I am not upset with how it does getting 14 for most everything on a day to day basis with 17-18 mpg on road trips. Not really much worse than the lighter 1500 with a 5.3L I had before, so I guess when you factor larger motor, 4.10 rear ratio, and a heavier vehicle, the 2500 is not doing bad at all.

 

While I might do better with a 1500 in the mpg arena, I wouldn't have the hauling capacity I do, which is essential. Even with full tank (36 gallons), two people in the cab, and a couple of hundred lb of tools and stuff in the back, I still can put on 2300 lb of payload. No 1500 is going to touch those limits.

 

As for diesel vs gas, each person has to decide for themselves. Diesel fuel pricing has been pretty favorable for the last year. But what short memories many folks have. The days of $5 diesel were only a few years ago, and no guarantee they will not repeat. And the additional cost of the Dmax and its associated maintenance requirements, nah, the cost benefit ratio to me just isn't there. If one has some serious heavy work to do on a regular basis, that would be different.

Edited by Cowpie

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While I do have a 2500HD and I know it is going to be a gas guzzler, I still try to get the most out of each gallon, and I am not upset with how it does getting 14 for most everything on a day to day basis with 17-18 mpg on road trips. Not really much worse than the lighter 1500 with a 5.3L I had before, so I guess when you factor larger motor, 4.10 rear ratio, and a heavier vehicle, the 2500 is not doing bad at all.

 

While I might do better with a 1500 in the mpg arena, I wouldn't have the hauling capacity I do, which is essential. Even with full tank (36 gallons), two people in the cab, and a couple of hundred lb of tools and stuff in the back, I still can put on 2300 lb of payload. No 1500 is going to touch those limits.

 

 

Exactly how I feel about it and made my decision to upgrade to the 2500HD (but stay with a gasser) easy at the end. Did take a lot of Microsoft Excel analysis on fuel cost/usage to finally decide the numbers didn't work out to spend another $8k on the Duramax. By the time the Duramax fuel savings paid for the initial cost increase, everything outside of the powertrain probably would have been falling apart anyways. Oh yeah, and the fact that I don't tow anything more than a car here and there or a handful of snowmobiles!

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I have a 2016 3500 Dually 6.0 in transit right now and I will say what so many have already said. I want to stick with a proven engine and in my model, the 6.0 gives me a 5770 pound payload, 760 pounds more than the Duramax in the same model which has only 5010 pounds. I really need that exra payload. See the bottom line in chart.

My 2008 Dually Duramax only has a 3700 pound payload and my camper with 2 slides has a dry weight of 4100 pounds.

In every model, the 6.0 gas has a bigger payload than the Duramax, quite a bit more in DRW models

The last time I bought a new truck with an unproven track record was my 2004 F350 with the infamous 6.0

Powerstroke. Now that is the 6.0 that is still called the sick-0 in many circles and after getting hauled in 3 times, it made a GM owner out of me and I will always be grateful for that.post-151531-0-66531000-1450066333_thumb.png

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Edited by Rvduck

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I have a 2016 3500 Dually 6.0 in transit right now and I will say what so many have already said. I want to stick with a proven engine and in my model, the 6.0 gives me a 5770 pound payload, 760 pounds more than the Duramax in the same model which has only 5010 pounds. I really need that exra payload. See the bottom line in chart.

My 2008 Dually Duramax only has a 3700 pound payload and my camper with 2 slides has a dry weight of 4100 pounds.

In every model, the 6.0 gas has a bigger payload than the Duramax, quite a bit more in DRW models

The last time I bought a new truck with an unproven track record was my 2004 F350 with the infamous 6.0

Powerstroke. Now that is the 6.0 that is still called the sick-0 in many circles and after getting hauled in 3 times, it made a GM owner out of me and I will always be grateful for that.attachicon.gifimage.png

 

Just remember that how the truck is optioned out will change the payload. The max numbers are typically on a WT trim with no options. Higher trims usually lower the payload and occupant and cab payload will affect it as well. Make sure you check the tire placard for the true max payload when it arrives.

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Thanks for your reply. I do know that everything put in a truck weather it is people or options is part of the payload.

4x4s have around 330 pounds less payload in the same model 4x2 as you can see in the chart above.

The steel wheels on the WT models probably weigh more than the alloy wheels on the higher trim levels and the option that lowers the payload the most is the Duramax, in my model, it takes away 760 pounds of payload.

The bling and other electronics in the High Country trim I ordered is small potatoes compared to that.

I really like my 08 Duramax but from the research I have done, I think I will like the 6.0 gasser. My new Dually has a

13025 GWWR and I should be around 12500 all loaded up. My 08 Dually has a 11400 GVWR and even loaded light with only 1/3 tank of fresh water, I was 1000 pounds over that.

Both Ford and Ram have DRW models that give me the payload I need with Diesel engines but I wanted to stick with GMC so I had to go gas. Without starting a new topic, does anyone know the approx numbers of 6.0 gas engines that GM has made. The Dmax passed the 1 millionth mark a while back. Just curious.

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It has to be a lot of L96 6.0L motors out in the market. The motor is also used as a marine engine and will be going in some of the new medium duty trucks coming out. I have no actual stats, but from my mental and paper note taking while traveling around the 15 state area I do about 130,000 miles a year driving, there are a lot of 2500/3500 pickups running around and from what I have seen, about a 3 to 1 ratio of gassers to diesel.

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What are everyone's thoughts on the difference between gas and diesel engine longevity? I'm pretty confident in a Duramax out past 200k, a gasser...?

 

 

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Depends how they are used. I have seen Dmax's grenade at just over 100K and seen others stretch out to over 600K before needing any work. The 6.0L, same kind of thing. I have seen people blow them up at 50K and seen others take them on out to over 300K and they are still running fine. It is all in how they are operated and maintained. Operated properly, the diesel will generally outlive a gasser on average by a fair margin. The components are significantly different. But how much it costs over that time to get it there could make it not worthwhile. Each engine has its place and both are very good engines. I can drop in another crate 6.0L after mine dies and still be less overall cost compared to a Dmax over time. Doesn't really matter. After all, the odds of the body dying is better than the engine failing over a 300K mile stretch. At least on the gravel roads I have to operate on and living in the rust belt.

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Been towing a 12000lbs keystone fifth wheel with the 6.0 for the last 8 years with ease although it doesn't tow as the diesel but I tow that fifth wheel like once a year so its not worth the extra money to upgrade

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The L96 6.0 is sandbagged from the factory and can be abused 6 ways to Sunday. I went back to it after a 6.4 Dodge. GM specs 4.10's with every 6.0 model. It's for towing and hauling and not fuel economy. There's no gearing options. It works no matter what you do to it. It's not fast but it'll pull better than Dodge 6.4 and it'll have much better drivability day to day because of the nicely geared 6/speed.

 

The cost of a diesel doesn't bother me but the idling for hours on end in the cold does. I would've bought a 6.2 Ford if I didn't get his truck.

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I found this to be a good discussion on gas vs. diesel. The discussion is mostly for the purpose of towing, and I suppose you might want to skip the half ton discussion part of it.

Edited by X25

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Lots of good points. Good video. It does depend on what one is doing. I may tow some pretty heavy stuff occasionally, up to 13,000 lb trailer gross, but it is done in a relatively close proximity of home. Hardly more than 40 miles one way. And some interesting grades on the rural roads, but very short. Never any 4 lane freeway stuff for long distances. Gasser does fine. If I was yanking a big 5th wheel camper to AZ for the winter, yeah, diesel is the way to go. The problem with discussing towing is that there is more being towed than boats and RV's. I never tow any of those. Just flat bed or dump trailer short distance stuff. Even when I haul heavy, it is going to be within the same 40-50 mile one way range. Gasser more than adequate for those times. And the gasser does just fine for occasional snow plowing work as well.

Edited by Cowpie

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