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60,000 mile fluid changes

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Thanks guys. I had them change them. I appreciate all of the advice. I don't think I would have changed them otherwise.

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Interesting Note -

 

the new GM Truck 8 speed automatic transmission has NO dipstick or filler tube

Neither does the Dodge 8spd in the Ram...

 

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

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Kind of funny how new Otr trucks are running 50,000 mile OCI, 500,000 mile trans fluid intervals, and I believe similar on diffs, yet light trucks can't go this long.

 

If the 8 speed has no dipstick, it better have a lifetime warranty.

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Neither does the Dodge 8spd in the Ram...

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

The ZF 8 in the Ram also has the filter integrated in the pan, and $43/Litre fluid, same stuff Audi uses.

 

What does GM use in the 8 speed?

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Kind of funny how new Otr trucks are running 50,000 mile OCI, 500,000 mile trans fluid intervals, and I believe similar on diffs, yet light trucks can't go this long.

 

If the 8 speed has no dipstick, it better have a lifetime warranty.

 

 

Well, in all fairness, it is not a apples to apples comparison. A commercial semi truck operates for hours on end at a time, has a 10 gallon oil sump with significant better filtration, etc. Running long intervals at consistent RPM ranges and normal engine operating temperatures is extremely easier on engine oil than the typical short operating intervals for personal vehicles that endure large RPM operational changes. These heavy truck engines are akin to stationary industrial engines that operate for hours and hours within a given operating RPM range. Even the RPM variances between shifts on the commercial trucks are tighter than most autos and pickups. It is typical for a commercial semi truck to have only 200-250 RPM variance between gear shifts. And these HD engines are typically operating in the 1300-1600 RPM range all day long. Some in the 1200-1500 RPM range. And HDEO diesel rated oil has a different blend of additives in the mix than PCMO gasoline only rated oils. HDEO's typically are more robust in their formulation.

 

And transmissions are significantly different and have different fluids that are used. A commercial semi truck typically uses 50w synthetic trans lube and the temperatures are typically much lower due to substantially better cooling than automatic transmissions with typical 10w ATF synthetic. And don't confuse the so-called "automatics" many commercial semi trucks have now with the automatic transmissions in pickups. Those "automatics" in commercial semi trucks are really Automated Manual Transmissions. They are regular non synchro manual transmissions that have their own TCM that shifts the gears. The same principle as truck drivers with regular manual transmissions do by "floating" the gear shifts without using the clutch. Those transmissions still have a clutch just like any other manual, but again, the computer module engages and disengages the clutch as needed at stops. Torque converters and the hydraulic locking and unlocking of a series of planetary gears can generate a lot of shearing force on ATF in the full automatics we have in pickups.

 

Even the limited number of HD Allison Automatics in some heavy commercial trucks are in a different league in many ways. For one, they typically have full TC lockup at only 2-5 mph. They use a different class of ATF, and have around 56 qt fluid capacity.

Edited by Cowpie
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In most of the vehicles iv owned if you turn it on it falls into the severe service category. I follow it till I'm out warranty. I'm about do again and anxious to see if they add miles between the next oil change being the weather is about to turn cooler. The heat is there reason for more frequent oil changes. I laugh at that and told them the engine doesn't know how hot it is, it has a thermostat and runs at the same temp no matter what ambient temp is.

Edited by KARNUT

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Real good points. Most folks, if they actually opened that manual and took a look, might just find their vehicle would probably fall into severe service category in one way or another.

 

Actually, the dealership has it reversed. If they really had a clue what they were talking about, they would realize that, in many instances (though not always), the cold weather is harder on oil than the hot weather depending on the user. Condensation buildup in the engine is highest during cold weather months for instance. It is that condensation that can cause a higher level of sulfuric acids, sludge, and such to build up over the oil change interval.

Edited by Cowpie

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That's correct as you stated cold temps are worse. I believe in a lot of cases there're wanting to get you in there to up sell people, cabin filters, additives and other products. Most cases the expensive stuff that fails theses days are electronics. The macanical parts make it past the first owners, most of the time. Most dealers here are offering life time warranties, smart move for them. In the final negotiation they use it to sell there vehicles knowing there excluding electronics, where engines and transmissions are lasting past the first owners.

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I change my trans and rear end every 40-60k depending on how much towing, I've been doing..

Break fluid, and radiator flushing, every 100k, and using regular 10w-30w Castoroil changed ever 3k.

 

To me that is cheap insurance.

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This is a typical scam

Not true

 

They come up to you with some tranny fluid on a paper towel and tell you it's dirty and needs to be changed causing anyone not in the know to worry that your car is just about on the verge of breaking down.

It's possible

 

I have a 98 Yukon and an 03 Silverado, both with 200,000+ miles on them and have never touched the trans, diff, brake fluid etc., and all work A1.

Case-by-case basis

 

but at 60,000 miles you're nowhere near needing this type of work done, especially the brake fluid, that's total joke.

Have you ever heard of what happens to a transmission if you wait until 100k miles before it gets the first flush??

 

What does brake fluid harm is when the car isn't driven for very long periods of time (like months or years), moisture can eventually collect in the fluid and the brake system, driving the car every day, the brake system heating up, etc., keeps the moisture out of the fluid.

Where is your scientific data or evidence of this?

Just very poor advice. You sound like my tightwad grandfather. Just because he chooses to change nothing but the engine oil & otherwise drive the vehicle until in breaks down, automatically means that anyone else who chooses to preventively maintain his truck is pissing money away & "fixing something that isn't broken." That's old school, penny-pinching depression-era logic in its purest example. a logic that should have been cast to the wayside when he banked his first $mil but still driving the wheels right off his cars. My poor grandma worried to death the tires will blow out while going 60mph on the Frwy & he couldn't care any less.

People have documented the consistency and color of their front/rear diff fluid being almost chalky-gray in color in little as 10k miles on a new truck. There are 1-million threads, literally, discussing 4L60e transmission failure. Had the fluid been serviced before 100k miles and burned to a brown or maroon tint & kept the right foot out of it, possibly wouldn't have any issues until much, much later, if at all. If you do any research at all, any web surfing, forum subscriptions, whatever, you will find that regularly servicing the fluids will dramatically increase the life of vehicle components. Neglect the fluids and chances of failure increase dramatically. It's all in the back of your vehicle user manual and even the mileage associated per manufacturer is not set in stone. The best method is to check all of the fluids for consistency & clarity, periodically if you do not trust your mechanic or local service department. I too am wary of others intentions so I assume the responsibility of keeping my vehicle in the best order I possibly can. I don't want to spend a fortune on major replacement later because I chose to avoid a much smaller cost in routine maintenance earlier in ownership. Do some research, read other owners testimonials and suggestions resulting from THEIR failures and neglect. It's worth the time & effort, believe me.

Edited by Chubbs878

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Just very poor advice. You sound like my tightwad grandfather. Just because he chooses to change nothing but the engine oil & otherwise drive the vehicle until in breaks down, automatically means that anyone else who chooses to preventively maintain his truck is pissing money away & "fixing something that isn't broken." That's old school, penny-pinching depression-era logic in its purest example. a logic that should have been cast to the wayside when he banked his first $mil but still driving the wheels right off his cars. My poor grandma worried to death the tires will blow out while going 60mph on the Frwy & he couldn't care any less.

People have documented the consistency and color of their front/rear diff fluid being almost chalky-gray in color in little as 10k miles on a new truck. There are 1-million threads, literally, discussing 4L60e transmission failure. Had the fluid been serviced before 100k miles and burned to a brown or maroon tint & kept the right foot out of it, possibly wouldn't have any issues until much, much later, if at all. If you do any research at all, any web surfing, forum subscriptions, whatever, you will find that regularly servicing the fluids will dramatically increase the life of vehicle components. Neglect the fluids and chances of failure increase dramatically. It's all in the back of your vehicle user manual and even the mileage associated per manufacturer is not set in stone. The best method is to check all of the fluids for consistency & clarity, periodically if you do not trust your mechanic or local service department. I too am wary of others intentions so I assume the responsibility of keeping my vehicle in the best order I possibly can. I don't want to spend a fortune on major replacement later because I chose to avoid a much smaller cost in routine maintenance earlier in ownership. Do some research, read other owners testimonials and suggestions resulting from THEIR failures and neglect. It's worth the time & effort, believe me.

 

 

You're exactly the kind of customer the shops like and are hoping walk in the door every day! Easy money. :thumbs:

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