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rotti

Chassis Lube on 2012 HD?

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When I purchased my new 2012 2500HD 4x4 I actually studied the owners manual maintenance schedule and noticed no mention of lubrication of the front chassis (I assumed sealed joints). I was recently having my tires rotated and happened to notice grease zerts.

 

I called three different Chevy/GMC service departments and got various answers ranging from: "there are none", there are "four" and "they're sealed". A google search seemed to indicate nine to eleven zerts.

 

So color me confused:

I assume if there are zerts they're meant to be greased.

Why no mention in the maintenance schedule/owners manual?

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No idea why they aren't mentioned, but if they have zerks, then you definitely want to grease them regularly. If they didn't want you to grease them, they wouldn't have included the zerks.

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Are you sure it's not in the maintenance schedule? It's in mine and shows the interval to be every other oil change. My book calls it "chassis components lubrication."

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On a 2012 2500hd 4wd, there are nine zerks...any good grease is suitable. Once my Schaeffers is done, I'll be using Mobile

1.

 

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

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On a 2012 2500hd 4wd, there are nine zerks...any good grease is suitable. Once my Schaeffers is done, I'll be using Mobile

1.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

On mine there are eleven. I think on y'alls they eliminated the outer tie-rod zerks = a total of nine.

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I have four ball joints, four tie rods, and the bellcrank. Where are the others? There are no more locations in mine?

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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the idler arm should have two, one where it attaches to the main steering arm, the second should at the top of the frame-mounted part of the idler arm (not easy to get to, some 3rd party ones will actually have an extension hanging down for you to grease instead.

the pitman arm should have one where it attaches to the main steering arm

 

then the u-joints may or may not have them, depending on if they've been replaced with ones that have zerks

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Correct, four on the tie rod, one on the idler arm support (I know this as a bell crank), and the four ball joints. That's nine.

 

For the idler arm, I cut a minor portion of the plastic "skid plate" off so I could reach up in to get that zerk.

 

Everything else on mine is a sealed-for-life unit.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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sdeeter, I noticed you have the same year/truck I do.

 

I looked through my owners manual and see no mention of a chassis lube schedule....am I missing something?

 

In any case I'll go with this:

 

Are you sure it's not in the maintenance schedule? It's in mine and shows the interval to be every other oil change. My book calls it "chassis components lubrication."

 

 

Thanks for the responses!

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I lube every oil change...

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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I am still kind of new to chassis lube. So, that said. You should not pump in new grease if the boot is full. I popped a boot or two before. I think you want to feel the boot. If it is depleted, then pump until you notice a slight swell. If it is already squishy- then you may wanted to just wipe it clean and leave it alone.

 

 

 

 

 

On the other hand, does anyone have advice? Like, are you supposed to be able to tell how much grease is in the boot or is being injected by how heavy you have to press the lever (or squeeze the gun)?

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You can't really go by pressure, as also depends on the fitting, if it's a little plugged with dirt/rust...

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I pump until grease comes out...the "seal" on these is more of a dirt shield, not a true seal. Always have, always will...been doing it this way for 30 plus years.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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Yup.... clean all zerks and around any "dust shield/boot"... pump grease till fresh grease comes out. Clean area with WD and wipe dry. I spray silicone on rag then wipe on the boot and zeroes.. doesn't collect as much dirt...

 

For sealed bearings, there usually is no zerk.

 

If a zero there, GENTLY pump grease... when it gets "tight", quit!!! Too much pressure CAN and will push seal out.

 

Crawl under your truck (with bandanna over face and eye protection.)... find and clean the chassis lube points as above. Get grease Gun.. Then get back under and lube up the chassis.

 

Just a 10 minute job once you figure it out.

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Please explain what a zero is and how to find it.

 

I gather it is some kind of 'stamp' or imprint on the rubber boot of the numeral '0' alerting you not to overgrease. Just a guess going from what you wrote cfell.

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