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New brake pads


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As long as you drive like a normal person and don't do too much heavy hauling or towing then regular brake pads will do just fine. I usually go to Autozone and I've used Duralast before with no problem. I don't remember having issues with anything from Autozone to be honest.

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2015 Denali HD 4x4. I drive in rush hour traffic for ~10hrs a week and tow a 13K fifth wheel at least a couple weekends a month. From what I've read, 50K is not that unusual for the brake pads, especially the front...

I do similar, still 50% or better front and rear on my 2500hd.

 

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

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I have managed fleets of 100's of these trucks, I am telling you the brake pads are still good to go.

 

I would replace with OEM Ac-Delco pads WHEN it is time.

I would agree as our fleet vehicles never saw pads well past 100k heck one went over 200k "Nope" the dealership kept saying? jeesh...crazy!

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Oddly enough it is the rear pads and rotors that need replaced before the fronts on these '11+ chassis's.

 

That is weird since brake shoes on drums on the rear last longer than disc. The HDs don't have disc on the rear do they? I can't imagine that they do since it seems like GM tried rear disc and went back to drum to only go back to rear disc on the K2 1/2 tons. For the 1/2 tons with the GMT900s before the K2s maybe it depended on the trim, but a buddy with a base '11 GMC has rear drums. Rear disc of course stop better than rear drums, but it seems like drums in the rear handle the weight of hauling and towing better, but I could be wrong. I mean commercial trucks still use drums all around, and I mean the big commercial trucks.

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That is weird since brake shoes on drums on the rear last longer than disc. The HDs don't have disc on the rear do they? I can't imagine that they do since it seems like GM tried rear disc and went back to drum to only go back to rear disc on the K2 1/2 tons. For the 1/2 tons with the GMT900s before the K2s maybe it depended on the trim, but a buddy with a base '11 GMC has rear drums. Rear disc of course stop better than rear drums, but it seems like drums in the rear handle the weight of hauling and towing better, but I could be wrong. I mean commercial trucks still use drums all around, and I mean the big commercial trucks.

These HD trucks have 14.5in. disk brakes front AND rear, the rear brakes are doing a lot of braking these days. The braking system is very active and will send a lot of power to the rear brakes if traction will allow it.

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I still do mostly what the OP does, daily drive 50 miles of Philadelphia traffic and tow/haul heavy several times a month...I'm at 50% front and rear at 117k.

 

My rotors will need replaced because of northern rust, but not because of wear.

 

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