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Okay so I bought a new Silverado last year, the day I took it home I installed a number of things, one of those things being a wix "coolant" filter Part #33032. GM actually has a perfect quick disconnect on the fan shroud so I just unclipped that and slid the filter into place.

 

Why? I've just always been curious on a brand new truck. Does it actually matter? I don't think so because the trucks don't have a coolant fed oil cooler that could clog like the corvettes do so I actually might recommend it to those guys who do.

 

What I found interesting was  once I opened the filter there was a ton of gunk of a muddy type consistency. I've included a few pictures keep in mind the truck only had 7500 miles on it or so when I took this filter off. I don't see this playing a huge role in the lifetime of a vehicle (which is why GM probably doesn't include one) but I'm sure the gunk would clog small radiator/engine passages over time (years) of course. 

 

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Edited by turbocdubs

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Post the Wix part  # for those who might be interested

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Just now, txab said:

Post the Wix part  # for those who might be interested

My bad I meant to include that in the opening post its Wix #33032 fuel filter painted flat black so it wouldn't stick out in the engine bay.

IMG_0927.jpg

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Yes, PN please.  I don't think I've ever seen a coolant filter before.

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1 minute ago, Mike GMC said:

Yes, PN please.  I don't think I've ever seen a coolant filter before.

actually a "fuel" filter used in the coolant bypass line.. it doesn't have the capacity of the larger true coolant filters but this is also a much smaller scale cooling system 

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What does that small line over the radiator do?  Doesn't seem like much of the system flow goes through it.  Sorry, I'm at work and can't go look at mine right now.

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5 minutes ago, Mike GMC said:

What does that small line over the radiator do?  Doesn't seem like much of the system flow goes through it.  Sorry, I'm at work and can't go look at mine right now.

That line goes from the thermostat housing to the "rear" coolant reservoir port. I thought the same and oddly enough it flows more than I thought once it is actually running 

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This looks like a pretty cool idea.  That crap, whatever it is, can't be good for the water pump and may eventually begin to clog things up.  Based on the amount you collected in 7500 miles, how often would you guess it needs to be changed?  I'm guessing change it with the oil, at least at first.

 

I wonder if that's calcium or other corrosion that has flaked off and started flowing around in the system?

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10 minutes ago, Mike GMC said:

This looks like a pretty cool idea.  That crap, whatever it is, can't be good for the water pump and may eventually begin to clog things up.  Based on the amount you collected in 7500 miles, how often would you guess it needs to be changed?  I'm guessing change it with the oil, at least at first.

 

I wonder if that's calcium or other corrosion that has flaked off and started flowing around in the system?

I'm actually not sure what it is, I believe most of it is the casting sands. I'm sure the most amount of junk would be found on the first few filter changes after that I would bet the interval could be extended but the fact that its a $5 filter readily found its hard not to just change it at every oil change 

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Weird, I’ve had these engine apart tons of times on too many vehicles to count and have never seen that before. I’d be curious to see what the inside of a new filter looks like. Possible paper coming apart in the filter?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I agree with Justin.  Looks like remnants of the paper filter media you installed.  That filter may be causing more harm than good.

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In the DIY section of this forum, member Fl355 I think is his name actually installs a true coolant filter for his truck. I was really intrigued by both of your posts on a coolant filter. Check out the DIY thread also.

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