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Discovered! Features you may not have known about...


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On 1/23/2019 at 1:53 PM, BB68 said:

This is the reason I dont buy used.

 

That article further enforces the reason why I dont use auto and why local GM dealerships stock transfercase clutches. Obviously the clutch isnt burnt out everytime you use it, but with the right spotty ice conditions they have worn out in under 120 miles. 

I'm no expert, but I doubt that very much

 

I don't think you can wear out the clutches in 120 miles unless you were purposely trying to destroy it or abuse it. I have heard of people leaving there trucks in Auto for the entire ownership of the vehicle (over 100 thousand miles) with no problems whatsoever. I definitely wouldn't recommend that either, but if you drive your truck properly it is completely fine to drive in Auto in mixed conditions. That's exactly what it is designed for.

 

Try to remember to turn back to 2wd when dry condition.

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16 minutes ago, jjt said:

I'm am not an expert, but I doubt that very much

 

I don't think you can wear out the clutches in 120 miles unless you were purposely trying to destroy it or abuse it. I have heard of people leaving there trucks in Auto for the entire ownership of the vehicle (over 100 thousand miles) with no problems whatsoever. I definitely wouldn't recommend that either, but if you drive your truck properly it is completely fine to drive in Auto in mixed conditions. That's exactly what it is MARKETED for.

 

Try to remember to turn back to 2wd when dry condition.

fixed your quote.

 

I dont have any pics or VINs of the vehicle in question, but I do have friends and one of them replaced that clutch on a brand (at the time) pickup.

 

Even in the article posted it listed the clutch is only 5 - 20%(not going to reread and give exact) applied .... how can you even argue? Apply your brakes at 20% for 120 miles, tell me what happens.

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4 minutes ago, BB68 said:

fixed your quote.

 

I dont have any pics or VINs of the vehicle in question, but I do have friends and one of them replaced that clutch on a brand (at the time) pickup.

 

Even in the article posted it listed the clutch is only 5 - 20%(not going to reread and give exact) applied .... how can you even argue? Apply your brakes at 20% for 120 miles, tell me what happens.

My Quote didn't need to be fixed. The transfer case was designed by an engineer not marketed. Driving in 4x4 in mixed conditions can be very stressful on certain components, especially in tight turning situations (parking lots).

 

This is my third GM/Chev truck with Auto, I live in Canada and drive in Auto quit often during the winter months. I have never had an issue. Everyone I know that has Auto does the same and none of them have had problems either.

 

How can you compare driving in Auto to driving with brakes at 20%?

 

Just because one guy you know had a problem doesn't mean it's a bad system and people shouldn't use it. 

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11 minutes ago, jjt said:

My Quote didn't need to be fixed. The transfer case was designed by an engineer not marketed. Driving in 4x4 in mixed conditions can be very stressful on certain components, especially in tight turning situations (parking lots).

 

This is my third GM/Chev truck with Auto, I live in Canada and drive in Auto quit often during the winter months. I have never had an issue. Everyone I know that has Auto does the same and none of them have had problems either.

 

How can you compare driving in Auto to driving with brakes at 20%?

 

Just because one guy you know had a problem doesn't mean it's a bad system and people shouldn't use it. 

I have changed out 2 or 3 of them over the years, but they also had 80k + miles on them too. Our local dealers stock them.

One variable would change how long they last would be location. I see you are hiding behind a screen name with no location. We have much more time with in-climate weather vs someone in Texas.

 

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4 minutes ago, BB68 said:

I have changed out 2 or 3 of them over the years, but they also had 80k + miles on them too. Our local dealers stock them.

One variable would change how long they last would be location. I see you are hiding behind a screen name with no location. We have much more time with in-climate weather vs someone in Texas.

 

I'm not hiding,  I'm in Calgary AB Canada.

 

I assume you work as a mechanic, or in the Auto industry if you have changed 2 or 3 of them. I'm not trying to argue with you and I appreciate your input. I'm not in the auto industry at all, so there's no doubt that you would be more knowledgeable and aware of problematic components. I know clutches are a wear item that will eventually fail, but under 120 miles would have to be severe abuse.

 

I think the Auto transfer case works great and should last a long time if used properly.

 

Just out curiosity, do you know what kind of cost to replace the clutches?

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8 hours ago, jjt said:

My Quote didn't need to be fixed. The transfer case was designed by an engineer not marketed. Driving in 4x4 in mixed conditions can be very stressful on certain components, especially in tight turning situations (parking lots).

 

This is my third GM/Chev truck with Auto, I live in Canada and drive in Auto quit often during the winter months. I have never had an issue. Everyone I know that has Auto does the same and none of them have had problems either.

 

How can you compare driving in Auto to driving with brakes at 20%?

 

Just because one guy you know had a problem doesn't mean it's a bad system and people shouldn't use it. 

I believe it becomes factual when that guy knows a guy who knew a guy that it happened too. Just saying, can't argue logic like that.....

Edited by JimCost2014
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16 hours ago, JimCost2014 said:

I believe it becomes factual when that guy knows a guy who knew a guy that it happened too. Just saying, can't argue logic like that.....

The credibility is also strong when you reply to a post where the guy says he lives in canada by saying he's hiding his location and must live in Texas or something where he never needs 4WD...

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Not specific to GM's however my mind is blown -  If you pay closer attention to the gas indicator light in your vehicle, you might notice that there is an arrow next to the pump. That arrow is indicating to you which side your fuel cap sits on. Other lights simply use the pump handle to indicate which side it is on.

 

 

Capture.JPG

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LOL.  I just figured out the pump thing a few years ago.  I have two cars/trucks I regularly drive and the fill caps are on opposite sides.  For years I never remembered which side.  Now I look at that every time I fill up.  How'd I go a lifetime to only find that recently?!

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40 minutes ago, Styles_888 said:

Not specific to GM's however my mind is blown -  If you pay closer attention to the gas indicator light in your vehicle, you might notice that there is an arrow next to the pump. That arrow is indicating to you which side your fuel cap sits on. Other lights simply use the pump handle to indicate which side it is on.

 

 

Capture.JPG

Very convenient when renting cars/trucks for sure...thankfully my 70 Chevelle doesn't need one :D 

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6 minutes ago, parshal said:

LOL.  I just figured out the pump thing a few years ago.  I have two cars/trucks I regularly drive and the fill caps are on opposite sides.  For years I never remembered which side.  Now I look at that every time I fill up.  How'd I go a lifetime to only find that recently?!

LMAO I just discovered that in the last few years too and I thought I  was the last person on earth to know this...  so I am proud to pass title!

 

In my defence, I had my last truck for 17 years before this one though...

 

1998 GMC Sierra K1500 364,000 that I loved but was just rotting too much to work for me. Too bad...  if I’d known I was going to keep it that long I’d have had it sprayed every year. 

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This is an old thread but one that applies...I had never heard of this feature called "Afterblow" but it's on our trucks but turned off by default, can only be turned on by the dealer...I think this will be especially good for high humidity areas:

 

 

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Didn't search entire thread to see if it was mentioned yet - but on my '18 Denali - I just noticed that when you activate "trailer mode" on the shifter - the Battery Gauge in the cluster disappears and is replaced with a Transmission Temp Gauge.

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  • txab changed the title to Discovered! Features you may not have known about...

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