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Longest Lasting? GM Trucks and SUVs Top Lists Of Most Driven Older Vehicles

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isee cars top driven vehicles.png

John Goreham
Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
7-11-2018

 

A new study by our friends at iSeeCars looked at how many miles drivers put on 10-year-old vehicles. We like this study because we feel that it shows which older vehicles owners trust day in and day out to log big miles.  Phong Ly, CEO of iSeeCars.com, drew this conclusion: “The vehicles with the highest annual mileage tend to also be the vehicles that last the longest,” said Ly. “People who drive their cars the most are likely to prolong the lives of their vehicles with regular service and maintenance because these vehicles may be a large part of their livelihood.” That sure sounds like our group.

 

GM’s full-size SUVs make up the top three spots on the list of the overall most driven 10-year-old vehicles. They also account for five of the top ten overall. The number one most driven vehicle in the study, the Chevrolet Suburban, is driven 25% more than the average for vehicles in the 10-year age group.

isee cars pickups most miles.png

When it comes to trucks in the study, GM trucks took the top two spots. The Silverado and Sierra are driven about 5% more than other 10-year-old truck models. “Pickups are often used as work vehicles to transport their drivers between job sites and accrue high mileage as a result,” said Ly. Interestingly, the Colorado and Canyon (prior generation) are driven less than the average. 

 

GM also had the vehicle with the overall fewest miles per year in the 10-year age group. That vehicle was the Chevrolet Corvette. As any sports car owner knows, the quality of those miles is more important the quantity. 

 

You can read the full study by iSeeCars.com at this link.  

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damn I put double that on my truck a year lol

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Wow those numbers are nothing and they consider that a lot? I've been around 20k/year since I moved back to NH. In Michigan it was 30-35k+ but that was spread out among like 40-45 rental cars each year. haha

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8 hours ago, SarahsGMC said:

damn I put double that on my truck a year lol

I thought the same thing?  30K these days.....

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Agreed.  Like others have posted, I will have had my '15 Yukon XL Denali for a year here at the end of August and I've already put 32K miles on it.  I usually average 25-30K miles a year.

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For 40 years I averaged 50K miles a year. Retired just under 20K a year. Those must be east coast numbers. The south and mid west should be higher.


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I pack on a good 20,000 miles a year.

 

I will say we live in the salt belt and the older Chevy's have some rust where the Fords and Rams have holes in the bodies.

 

The Provincial Police are fast to yank any rust bucket off the road.

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Always happy to see GM Trucks being recognized for something good. 

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Posted (edited)

Most miles is not the same as longest lasting.  Let's see which ones are still going after they're 20 years old.  My '09 is still going--the warranties have long since run out, and the $ that should go towards a down payment on a new truck, I keep having to put into the '09 to keep it going.  Gets to a point where you say the title of ownership says 09, but the vehicle's subsystems all have newer parts.  Like that old song--I have a 09-10-11-12-13 automobile.  

Edited by MaverickZ71

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I see far more GMK400s and GMT900s (1990s-2006) on the road vs Ford F150s and Ram 1500s.. No matter where I go.  I see more new Rams and F150s constantly, yet in the long run, it's the Chevy/GMCs that are still around 20 years later. 

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On 7/16/2018 at 9:00 PM, Colossus said:

I see far more GMK400s and GMT900s (1990s-2006) on the road vs Ford F150s and Ram 1500s.. No matter where I go.  I see more new Rams and F150s constantly, yet in the long run, it's the Chevy/GMCs that are still around 20 years later. 

Agreed. Here where I live, I see a LOT of 2-5 year old showboat Rams and Fords. Even a few really dressy Raptors. But the only trucks I consistently see loaded down, beat up, and still working 15+ years in are late 90's, early 00's GM pickups. Honestly, I was a Dodge guy until about 8 years ago. I owned two Durangos and a various lineup of passenger cars. But after marrying into a GM family, my wife having a couple of Chevy passenger cars, and myself a GM SUV before my Sierra, I don't know that I'd go back. They seem more sturdily built, they seem to put more clear thought not just into how to cram X into a Y shaped hole, but how that part will be serviced in the future these days. I can't tell you how many weird issues I had working on my Durangos over the years due to poor engineering choices and fastener positioning. But since my Trailblazer, my wife's Impala and Cobalt, and my Sierra, I feel like they are just better planned out. Things are in locations that are sensible. My only real gripe thus far is the turn signal bulb location in my K2XX. I have to remove the entire fixture to remove the bulbs. Maybe the same is true of modern Fords and Rams. But, after helping a buddy change the oil in the Cummins on his '17 2500, I'm likely to think not so much. I mean, we had to build a damn catch plate to "receive" the removed oil filter so it could be capped and fished out from the underbody to prevent a quart of oil drenching the suspension.

 

I guess, really, to each their own.

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Posted (edited)

Geesh, I put 2k per year on my Silverado if I'm lucky, and I still have to constantly fix the POS ... :mad:

 

Still haven't put any time into troubleshooting the reason for the monitors not running in 3k miles. I just drive with the "rejected" sticker ... :shakehead: Haven't figured out a way to make money fixing my own crap yet. 94k miles on her now.

Edited by Jsdirt

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20 minutes ago, Jsdirt said:

Geesh, I put 2k per year on my Silverado if I'm lucky, and I still have to constantly fix the POS ... :mad:

 

Still haven't put any time into troubleshooting the reason for the monitors not running in 3k miles. I just drive with the "rejected" sticker ... :shakehead: Haven't figured out a way to make money fixing my own crap yet. 94k miles on her now.

2k miles a YEAR? It's probably dry rotting parts sitting there lol... Why do you drive so little?

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GM trucks last, Ford's & Dodges rot in the junk yard... You're lucky to see a 20 year old Ford on the road in this neck of the woods, I see 30 year old GM's all the time... Toyota's seem to hold up pretty damn good too... I put about 25k a year on my truck I'm planning to keep it until somewhere around 125-150k... At which point I'll buy another GM truck...

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Posted (edited)

They're all junk in the 21st Century. I can assure you, any '96-up vehicle on the road after 10 years has cost the owner a pile of money to keep it going. 

 

5 minutes ago, Imcrazy said:

2k miles a YEAR? It's probably dry rotting parts sitting there lol... Why do you drive so little?

No commuting. It only gets used for working - towing cars, coal, hauling mowers, etc.. Sits in the garage most of the time. I drive my '86 Grand Marquis, '93 Volvo 940, or '74 Yamaha RD350 to get around.

 

Dryrot is the least of my worries with this toilet ...

Edited by Jsdirt

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