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2019 Chevy Silverado Has A Sharp Focus On Towing – Here’s What’s Special

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2019-Silverado-Trailering-01.jpg

John Goreham

Staff Writer

8-2-18

 

The all-new Silverado has so many improvements and updates they are hard to grasp in a single overview. In this spotlight, we will focus on what Chevy has done to make towing easier and more practical for its 2019 Silverado owners. To suit a wide range of owners’ needs, Chevy is offering four distinct levels of trailering capability so owners can buy what they’ll use.  

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The Silverado has three major towing technologies that are added to the already very capable truck. First up is the Hitch Guidance with Hitch View. This adds a dynamic backing guideline to the Rear Vision Camera system to help drivers line up the hitch. It adds precision and a visual cue to make aligning a hitch to a trailer a bit easier.


Next up is the Advanced Trailering System.  This system itself incorporates three components. First, Auto Parking Brake Assist. This eliminates that annoying bit of movement that you get once you perfectly line up your trailer and then put the truck in Park. It sets automatically when the vehicle is put into Hitch View to help avoid vehicle movement. 


The third new technology is Chevy’s Trailer Tire Pressure Monitoring System. Before we get too far, you’re going to need some added equipment on your trailer that Chevy can provide. However, if you get it, this feature can monitor the tire pressure and temperature of the trailer tires using the truck’s infotainment system to help prevent blowouts from overheating and low tire pressures.


If you like your phone as a tool then you will also like Chevy’s Advanced Trailering System Infotainment app and myChevrolet app. The latter has some simple trailering features such as pre-departure step-by-step towing checklists and a glossary of towing terms. It also allows a solo driver to conduct a trailer light test using an automatic exterior light sequence to help confirm that the trailer is properly connected. 


The Advanced Trailering System app allows customers to track their miles, fuel economy and transmission temperature of their truck while towing. Brake gain memory is also part of this system and works with the Integrated Trailer Brake Controller, which provides fingertip control of the trailer brakes, to let the customer set and save the controller’s brake gain setting. Last, Trailer Theft Alert can activate the truck’s lights and horn if the harness of the trailer attached to the truck is disconnected. This works with your OnStar Safety & Security Plan and will send you a theft alert via phone, text or email.


Chevy’s Trailer Camera Package can use up to four cameras to enable a driver to see a 270-degree view. To take the guess work out of capabilities, Chevy’s new Trailering label is located on the driver’s side door jamb of all 2019 Silverados. The label provides owners with the information they need to calculate before setting out with a trailer. This label takes the guesswork out of towing and hauling and provides information such as:

Gross vehicle weight rating
Gross combined weight rating
Gross axle weight rating (rear)
Maximum payload
Maximum tongue weight
Curb weight


The folks at Chevy conducted a survey before designing the new 2019 Silverado. A majority of interested buyers, 60%, said that towing was one of their top priorities in a new truck. We’re one of those interested buyers and our new 2019 Silverado is on order with all of this technology. We look forward to doing a full review once our new GM-Trucks.com Silverado arrives.
 

2019-Silverado-Trailering-06.jpg

2019-Silverado-Trailering-010.jpg

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Where is the camera on demand feature?   I want to see what the trailer/load is doing while under way.

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Trailer tire monitoring sounds good too. I had a tire (6 seasons old) explode a few years ago. Tread wear was good with no cracks in either the sidewalls or between the treads. Pressures up to spec. Luckily only a wheel opening trim piece was cracked. It could've made more of a mess. I wish I had taken a pic of the failed tire. Other than the 8 or so inches of tread & belting that had 'disappeared' the tire looked OK. Replaced all 4 when I got home.

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On ‎2018‎-‎08‎-‎02 at 11:08 AM, twoheeldrive said:

Where is the camera on demand feature?   I want to see what the trailer/load is doing while under way.

Then look in your mirrors? 

 

Cool features, but I get along just fine with the current set up. Therefor I wouldn't be willing to pay any extra for these features. I felt spoiled enough when you could see your hitch in the backup camera that was a 2" screen integrated into the rear-view mirror of my 2010. Watching the hitch while going down the road is pointless and will distract drivers from watching what matters, which is the attitude of the trailer which can be monitored through the side mirrors. Kind of like making a DVD head unit not play video while driving, it just becomes a distraction. 

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11 minutes ago, 10SierraA.T. said:

Then look in your mirrors? 

 

Cool features, but I get along just fine with the current set up. Therefor I wouldn't be willing to pay any extra for these features. I felt spoiled enough when you could see your hitch in the backup camera that was a 2" screen integrated into the rear-view mirror of my 2010. Watching the hitch while going down the road is pointless and will distract drivers from watching what matters, which is the attitude of the trailer which can be monitored through the side mirrors. Kind of like making a DVD head unit not play video while driving, it just becomes a distraction. 

I mostly agree. A glance feature or something at the hitch would be nice. not so you stare at it, but just have a peak like checking your mirrors, see that everything is all good. 

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Look in my mirrors?  Wow, why didn't I think of that?  

 

Maybe you don't tow much, or you just tow a big box or something,  but I tow open utility trailers with heavy equipment that is tied down.  It would be really nice to be able to turn the camera on and see how that equipment is riding back there.  Mirrors are useless  because I can't see over the tailgate.   There is no reason that I can think of, other than a stupid law, that keeps the camera from being used when moving forward. 

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im excited for the new 6 cyl duramax, i never have been into diesels, but after owning my diesel  glk250 i am sold on it. the suv gets astounding gas mileage towing my rzr. also has more torque than my 5.3 sierra that i had.

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