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MotorTrend Silverado review

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3 hours ago, f8l vnm said:

Add Standard Bed which is i believe is about another 100-200lbs ? and its right around 5700 for both higher end models. One thing the FORD has that really heavy is the double moonroof. 

I am not sure but don't think this Denali had the Carbon Fiber bed (which shaves approx. 65 lbs) because they are not available in production models yet (and I assume they tested production models but could be wrong).  Given that the HEAVIEST these could weigh would be 5760 or so .  The HIgh country doesn't have the carbon bed so........

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7 hours ago, shift_grind said:

Ram had been tested at high 14s and 6.1-6.5 to 60, 3.92 gears.  

 

If the 5.3 is 6.4 seconds on a extremely hot day with 3.23 gears I'd say they're the same.  Not bad for the "weak" 5.3

I think they tested them all together for a shootout comparison upcoming....they mentioned the hot conditions in the Ram article as well.  In that article the mentioned a Laramie Longhorn 4x4 (those are pretty well optioned and probably fairly heavy, though they mentioned it did NOT have eTorq) and it ran 6.3 in the same hot conditions , slightly quicker than the two less optioned (I am guessing by their weights listed and prices ) Chevy's.....so close but not quite .  They also mention the Hemi feels better with better throttle response and tranny.....but honestly ......they seem VERY close in an all out drag race.  5.3L is not the dog many call it, especially with the 8 spd and lighter weight.

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1 hour ago, Shriker said:

I think they tested them all together for a shootout comparison upcoming....they mentioned the hot conditions in the Ram article as well.  In that article the mentioned a Laramie Longhorn 4x4 (those are pretty well optioned and probably fairly heavy, though they mentioned it did NOT have eTorq) and it ran 6.3 in the same hot conditions , slightly quicker than the two less optioned (I am guessing by their weights listed and prices ) Chevy's.....so close but not quite .  They also mention the Hemi feels better with better throttle response and tranny.....but honestly ......they seem VERY close in an all out drag race.  5.3L is not the dog many call it, especially with the 8 spd and lighter weight.

So 6.3 and 6.5 with E torque.  The Chevy's ran 6.4 and 6.6 and it looks like both had 3.23 gears.  

 

Like I said, identical performance. 

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Branded a "Hemi" one would expect more.

 

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I am not sure but don't think this Denali had the Carbon Fiber bed (which shaves approx. 65 lbs) because they are not available in production models yet (and I assume they tested production models but could be wrong).  Given that the HEAVIEST these could weigh would be 5760 or so .  The HIgh country doesn't have the carbon bed so........


These tests are conducted months before the issue is seen on the newsstand.

It would be common for an all-new vehicle like the Silverado to be a late prototype, not a production model.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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18 hours ago, M1ck3y said:

https://www.motortrend.com/cars/ford/f-150/2017/2017-ford-f-150-platinum-4x4-ecoboost-first-test/

 

17 ecoboost platinum = 5521

 

Where the heck is that weigh coming from when its all aluminum.

Ford's method of weight reduction was an "across the board" approach where they largely used aluminium (which is lighter than steel) in place of steel. GM on the other hand used a much more focused/thorough/efficient but more laborious approach to achieve weight reduction...They (GM) reviewed every major chassis and structural component and optimized it not only in terms of material selection but also thickness/size/form based on the component's functional requirements. Thus for example instead of simply substituting a steel suspension component with an aluminum one, you build one made with super high strength steel (which is much lighter than regular steel)  with varying cross section thickness and also form the component as one piece instead of 2 or 3 different pieces...this reduces weight of the component not only due to material selection but also due to material quantity (varying cross section thickness) and less complexity (one piece as opposed to 2 or 3 pieces to form the same component) not to mention cost efficiency because steel is easier to work with than aluminum. Now multiply this across the hundreds of components on a truck and you get a net weight reduction per truck similar or better than an "across the board" aluminum approach yet more cost effective.

 

PS: Ram used a similar weight reduction approach to GM though not as thorough as GM.

Edited by gmag

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21 hours ago, gmag said:

Ford's method of weight reduction was an "across the board" approach where they largely used aluminium (which is lighter than steel) in place of steel. GM on the other hand used a much more focused/thorough/efficient but more laborious approach to achieve weight reduction...They (GM) reviewed every major chassis and structural component and optimized it not only in terms of material selection but also thickness/size/form based on the component's fun2ctional requirements. Thus for example instead of simply substituting a steel suspension component with an aluminum one, you build one made with super high strength steel (which is much lighter than regular steel)  with varying cross section thickness and also form the component as one piece instead of 2 or 3 different pieces...this reduces weight of the component not only due to material selection but also due to material quantity (varying cross section thickness) and less complexity (one piece as opposed to 2 or 3 pieces to form the same component) not to mention cost efficiency because steel is easier to work with than aluminum. Now multiply this across the hundreds of components on a truck and you get a net weight reduction per truck similar or better than an "across the board" aluminum approach yet more cost effective.

 

PS: Ram used a similar weight reduction approach to GM though not as thorough as GM.

Do not forget the 2019 Plastic Hood Release Lever in the factor for weight reduction :thumbs:

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