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Serious as a heart attack. You actually know people that bought a truck, and want "good mileage" ? :noway:

Most of the people I know don’t drive pickups for anything other than work. Their spouses drive cars or vehicles that get better gas mileage than a truck. I can name at least six cars I’d rather drive for the same money I paid for a truck. They all will out perform, ride better, and get much better gas mileage.


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51 minutes ago, Jsdirt said:

I've never met a single person that bought a truck based on mileage numbers. Most want something that will do the job at hand, do it well (TORQUE), AND do it for MANY YEARS reliably, all without paying upwards of $60 LARGE to do so. So what if I use that same truck to commute? That's NOBODY'S business.

 

Given GM's past with the 5.3 from '07-up, I, and many others don't trust them to deliver on that reliability one.

 

If all I cared about was MPG, I'd ride the bike year-round. Kind of difficult to tow 7k with one of those, however ...

 Talk to retired folks or those on fixed income.  They want their cake and fuel economy too. And this will do the job. They dont drive bikes.. There is a whole Aging market out there that GM can see, and maybe some of us cant ..... yet.  PS. I will always have a 2500HD truck....till I only need a 1/2 ton ... and no car, Then I will want that economy.

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You know, I’m a 5.3 man for sure love it in my new Trailboss, been that way since trading up from my 1990 5.7 back in 2000 and 2007. They are rock solid and good power/mpg balance as it were. I am also a Honda and Subaru guy for my non truck needs. If they can really pack all the tech they stated (and functions as stated) this could be a great little motor. Especially tuning it in a “sport style” single or extra cab short bed 2wd. I by no means would expect this thing to move mountains or tow a big rig. But, It has its place, although longevity and reliablity (plus tuning and aftermarket) will be key to its success or demise. Just my two cents...

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7 hours ago, Jsdirt said:

Well I can't blame you for believing that, since you don't work in auto repair.

Assuming this reply was to me- I don't need to work in auto repair to know what's what with the 5.3. My first one had 200k miles on it when I sold it & it was still going strong. My current one has 50 k on it and has been flawless. It'll go a long time as well. Not only that, but there are many, many others with similar results. 
I'm sure you see the odd dud here and there, but remember you only see what rolls in your shop with problems. You don't see the ones that don't have problems, which is the clear majority- probably >90%.

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The article was well written and very informative. So far I been completely against a 4 in a full size pickup, but after reading this I would at least test drive one. That being said, when it came time to sign the papers, I would probably go with the V-8 for two reasons, one I’m old school, and two, I won’t buy the 4 until it gets a couple years of service under its belt. I would be the same way if I was buying an F-150. Keep the eco boost and all it’s complexity, I would buy the 5.0 V-8. 

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We are in the same camp; old school V-8 guys.  But sadly, tp paraphrase Arlo Guthrie, “ the times they are a changing”.  And, the auto industry is changing at warp speed.  Autonomous cars are coming on-line really fast as are ride for hire, rent as needed, etc, Uber, Lyft.  In fact, I took my daughters car in for routine maintenance the other day and didn’t want to wait so signed up for the shuttle to run me home.  In abou three minutes my customer rep came by and said your ride is out front.  Turned out that is was a Uber, dealer Canó longer utilized in-house drivers, cars, etc.  btw, I’m guessing when the next gen trucks after the T1 is brought out we old school V-8 guys will find that we will have to step up to the 3/4 ton models to buy a V-8.  But, so it goes 😤....

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5 hours ago, Nanotech Environmental said:

Assuming this reply was to me- I don't need to work in auto repair to know what's what with the 5.3. My first one had 200k miles on it when I sold it & it was still going strong. My current one has 50 k on it and has been flawless. It'll go a long time as well. Not only that, but there are many, many others with similar results. 
I'm sure you see the odd dud here and there, but remember you only see what rolls in your shop with problems. You don't see the ones that don't have problems, which is the clear majority- probably >90%.

90% ... lol - we'll agree to disagree on that one. I'm talking post 2006 models - the '07 new body and up. Prior to that, '06 and back, the engines were great. But as far as the '07 - 12's go, I haven't seen one yet that's made it more than 130k before needing lifters and a camshaft. I'm hearing it's more of the same for the '13 - up models too.

 

Problem is, you don't know how crappy a design is until you're out of warranty. At that point, GM couldn't give 2 craps about you, or your vehicle. Knowing what I know now, I wouldn't take that turbocharged 4-banger if it was GIVEN to me.

Edited by Jsdirt

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Changes in technology and in the automotive industry have been incredible to be part of over my past 60+yrs.  I would love to have a carbureted L6 or V8 pickup with manual transmission, steering, brakes and windows sitting in my driveway!  However, for my DD I prefer all of the latest innovations and for me to move forward with current developments.  The latest news regarding GM has them striving to reach 0 emissions targets.  My grandchildren may find themselves reminiscing about their 10spd "4 banger" in the not too distant future!  If or when I purchase a '19+.GM truck this new engine would be my first consideration. 

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I’ll take your prediction a step further;  I told my twin 27 year old daughters the other day that their next cars may be their last driveables.  In the not too distant future cars may transition from autonomous but also driveable to autonomous without driving capability (no steering wheel, etc).  However, due to the nature of work and other utility’s I’m guessing that trucks may retain driver capability for a good while, many years.  It would be difficult, impossible perhaps, to navigate around construction sites, ranches, farms, etc, without the ability to manually operate the vehicle.  But, predicting the future is tricky business.  So, we should hide and watch I guess 🙄...

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3 hours ago, Jsdirt said:

90% ... lol - we'll agree to disagree on that one. I'm talking post 2006 models - the '07 new body and up. Prior to that, '06 and back, the engines were great. But as far as the '07 - 12's go, I haven't seen one yet that's made it more than 130k before needing lifters and a camshaft. I'm hearing it's more of the same for the '13 - up models too.

 

Problem is, you don't know how crappy a design is until you're out of warranty. At that point, GM couldn't give 2 craps about you, or your vehicle. Knowing what I know now, I wouldn't take that turbocharged 4-banger if it was GIVEN to me.

For what it's worth, there have been quite a few on here that have made it past 130k no problem. My brother has an '11 with well over that and no issues.

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3 hours ago, Nanotech Environmental said:

For what it's worth, there have been quite a few on here that have made it past 130k no problem. My brother has an '11 with well over that and no issues.

All I can say to that is, BE THANKFUL! :) 

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Repeat post from another thread.

No replacement for cubic inches.

Old school, yes.

As for the longevity debate luck of the draw, owner treatment and maintenance IMO.

CeESVxV.gif

 

:)

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I wonder how it would sound? Like a fart can civic i used to own back in the day?

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1 hour ago, diyer2 said:

Repeat post from another thread.

No replacement for cubic inches.

Old school, yes.

As for the longevity debate luck of the draw, owner treatment and maintenance IMO.

CeESVxV.gif

 

:)

Yes, I attended this school!  The sound and size of my Harley SuperGlide makes me smile every time I push the starter!  It has twice the cubic inches of my previous Honda 750 and is much more fun (imo) to ride.  However, I would find it a challenge to defend the functionality or durability of one over the other.  I like the sound and character of an old V8 and for these reasons I can agree there is no replacement for cubic inches.  However, this L4 is producing power that exceed our beloved V8's of the past.  

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