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1 hour ago, Ozer said:

I wonder how it would sound? Like a fart can civic i used to own back in the day?

LOL, yeah it's definitely not going to produce a sound I'd want to amplify, that's for sure! :lol:

 

 

42 minutes ago, Donstar said:

Yes, I attended this school!  The sound and size of my Harley SuperGlide makes me smile every time I push the starter!  It has twice the cubic inches of my previous Honda 750 and is much more fun (imo) to ride.  However, I would find it a challenge to defend the functionality or durability of one over the other.  I like the sound and character of an old V8 and for these reasons I can agree there is no replacement for cubic inches.  However, this L4 is producing power that exceed our beloved V8's of the past.  

With comparably very little work, any V8 will CRUSH this force-fed 4-banger, even naturally aspirated. It takes MUCH more work and $$$ to get a 4-banger to V8 levels.

 

I don't know about you, but I'd rather have a V8 easily churning out 400 ft.lbs. of torque, rather than a 4-cylinder screaming to the moon and working it's butt off. Simple physics will tell you which one has a better chance of reaching 400k miles.

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3 hours ago, Jsdirt said:

LOL, yeah it's definitely not going to produce a sound I'd want to amplify, that's for sure! :lol:

 

 

With comparably very little work, any V8 will CRUSH this force-fed 4-banger, even naturally aspirated. It takes MUCH more work and $$$ to get a 4-banger to V8 levels.

 

I don't know about you, but I'd rather have a V8 easily churning out 400 ft.lbs. of torque, rather than a 4-cylinder screaming to the moon and working it's butt off. Simple physics will tell you which one has a better chance of reaching 400k miles.

One of the reviews I read reported that the sound was better than expected.  The power is achieved at relatively low rpms and I don't get the impression that it will be screaming to the moon.  We can only speculate based on our own points of reference and I hope this new engine proves to surpass expectations. 

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3 hours ago, Jsdirt said:

...With comparably very little work, any V8 will CRUSH this force-fed 4-banger, even naturally aspirated. It takes MUCH more work and $$$ to get a 4-banger to V8 levels.

 

I don't think that it was the intention to have the 2.7 at V8 levels (although it is).

The focus is on good efficiency in the environment which most of the trucks are used in. Daily driver to work, grocery getter and recreational use.

I had a hard time to wrap my head around it that a small engine with big power output will last.

But as in the original post stated, the materials used in this engine and the way it is designed is getting close to that of a diesel engine. So far, everyone is confident that a diesel can outlive any gas engine because of its design.

The only reason what was holding back gas engines like the little four banger, was the limitations by the compression ratio and the available fuel.

With new technology, like the cooling system, they were able to squeeze more out of what's available on hand.

 

so long

j-ten-ner

Edited by j-ten-ner
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I agree with everything you said ... BUT ... when GM turns the paper into reality, things usually end up VERY different (Olds 350 diesel  ... cough cough ...:D ).  These days, you can BET on that.

Edited by Jsdirt

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On ‎11‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 8:02 PM, Jsdirt said:

Serious as a heart attack. You actually know people that bought a truck, and want "good mileage" ? :noway:

I'd be one of those guys he knows. :rolleyes: 

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9 hours ago, j-ten-ner said:

I don't think that it was the intention to have the 2.7 at V8 levels (although it is).

The focus is on good efficiency in the environment which most of the trucks are used in. Daily driver to work, grocery getter and recreational use.

I had a hard time to wrap my head around it that a small engine with big power output will last.

But as in the original post stated, the materials used in this engine and the way it is designed is getting close to that of a diesel engine. So far, everyone is confident that a diesel can outlive any gas engine because of its design.

The only reason what was holding back gas engines like the little four banger, was the limitations by the compression ratio and the available fuel.

With new technology, like the cooling system, they were able to squeeze more out of what's available on hand.

 

so long

j-ten-ner

Appears the evolution of the gasoline engine continues.  Check out what Mazda is up to.  Gasser without spark plugs.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4770588/Mazda-announces-breakthrough-long-coveted-engine-technology.html

 

btw, concerning the best sounding engine;  I nominate the old flathead V-8 Ford engine with glass packs, preferably burned out, lol!  Loved that sound, especially when I would wrap my 51up in second gear then let off the gas.  I would do that to let my sweetie know I’m just about at her house.  But, I digress, sorry 😏...

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Fyi, while googling for info on the Mazda engine came across this.

https://jalopnik.com/what-its-like-to-ride-in-a-car-with-the-camless-engine-1529865968

 

Let’s see....  we have electric fuel pump, electric water pump, electric power steering,  no spark plugs, no cam shaft next?  Lots of possibilities with engine design, power, emissions, etc, with cam’less engine  for sure....

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I can recall that concept being discussed in Cycle World magazine over 20 years ago. There was a brilliant engineer who used to write articles for them every month - forget his name (I should know this ...). I remember him discussing what bikes of the future would be like, and pneumatic valves were one of the first things he talked about. Variable valve timing was another - I remember how far fetched that all sounded ...  and now, Kia's have VVT! Pneumatic valves have been used in Formula 1 racing for quite a while now. Think they had them back then, 20 + years ago if I'm not mistaken. 

 

They should just bring back the 2-stroke engine. The technology is there to keep the treehuggers happy. Look at the Evinrude E-Tec outboard - that's probably the most advanced 2-stroke engine on the planet. Just imagine the power a V8 2-stroke would put out. Even a V6. Most truck engines today are needing major engine work before, or by 100k miles, so rebuilding one at 100k wouldn't be that big of a deal. I can tell you it would be half the cost, or less to do so! The tech is probably there to make them go even longer today. The engine would weigh HALF of a regular V8, and put out twice the power. Force-feed that, and the potential is endless. No more oil changes to forget about and ruin the engine either. Could have an oil fill nozzle right under the fuel door with the gas tank's nozzle, and a little chime, or flashing LED to remind the person fueling (along with dashboard reminders) to add 2-stroke to the tank.

 

I'm dreaming. Must be because I watched Jay Leno's latest video, lol - what a great sound!

 

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2 hours ago, Snoringbear said:

Appears the evolution of the gasoline engine continues.  Check out what Mazda is up to.  Gasser without spark plugs.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4770588/Mazda-announces-breakthrough-long-coveted-engine-technology.html

 

btw, concerning the best sounding engine;  I nominate the old flathead V-8 Ford engine with glass packs, preferably burned out, lol!  Loved that sound, especially when I would wrap my 51up in second gear then let off the gas.  I would do that to let my sweetie know I’m just about at her house.  But, I digress, sorry 😏...

I can't imagine how they are going to keep that thing from detonating to pieces. Guaranteed it will need the highest octane available at the pump.

 

Reading further, it did say that it still uses spark plugs, but they'd only be used under certain conditions.

 

Why aren't any American manufacturers coming up with this kind of innovation? We used to be the kings of this type of thing back in the day ... :(

Edited by Jsdirt

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8 hours ago, Jsdirt said:

I can recall that concept being discussed in Cycle World magazine over 20 years ago. There was a brilliant engineer who used to write articles for them every month - forget his name (I should know this ...). 

I think the guy your trying to recall was named 'Gordon Jennings'

Think I still have some of his work hidden away somewhere. 

Edited by Grumpy Bear

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17 hours ago, Donstar said:

Yes, I attended this school!  The sound and size of my Harley SuperGlide makes me smile every time I push the starter!  It has twice the cubic inches of my previous Honda 750 and is much more fun (imo) to ride.  However, I would find it a challenge to defend the functionality or durability of one over the other.  I like the sound and character of an old V8 and for these reasons I can agree there is no replacement for cubic inches.  However, this L4 is producing power that exceed our beloved V8's of the past.  

Every motor produces more H.P. than years past.

My 93 5.7 L TBI was 200 H.P.

I guess I'm V8 addicted.

 

:)

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After reading the entire article about this new 2.7 L I hope it performs and lasts as they say it will.

Time will tell.

Really doesn't matter to me because my 2012 will be my last truck unless it gets totaled. Unlikely because I have never totaled a vehicle. 

I also like the V8 due to living in the mountains.

Running empty it's not a big deal, but towing it is to me.

Towing my boat to the lake is 100 miles round trip.

Lots of elevation changes, curves all momentum killers.

The displacement and technology of the 5.3 works for me.

I towed my boat with my 93 for a lot of miles in Colorado and the west and this 5.3 was a big upgrade.

Would a 6.2 be better? Maybe not better but faster up hill.

Wife's uncle says anybody can go fast down hill.

The thing is if your happy with any vehicle you own that's all that matters.

 

:)

 

 

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1 hour ago, diyer2 said:

Really doesn't matter to me because my 2012 will be my last truck unless it gets totaled.

I've owned a pickup since I bought my then 2year old '69 F100.   My '09 Sierra was to be my last truck according to my wife.  Her complaint was the operating cost of using a pickup as a DD.   She wasn't too pleased when I whined my way into a '15.  The difference in fuel costs between a Vortec and Ecotec is dramatic and  very noticeable.  The interior of the newer trucks is also a vast improvement.  Also, 3yrs of B to B warranty is a bonus.  I understand the economy of keeping a truck for several years,  but there are some cost efficiencies when buying new, imo.

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I think that depends on where you live. Here in MA, you ALWAYS lose buying new. Between depreciation the minute it rolls off the lot, to higher insurance premiums because it's new, to sales and annual excise taxes based on it's value, it's a losing proposition no matter how you slice it.  It's a rich-man's game here, with loaded trucks selling for $66k PLUS.

 

On top of that, in 12 years or less, it will be a pile of rusted out scrap. If you somehow manage to keep the body alive, the electrical gremlins will have you pulling your hair out.

Edited by Jsdirt

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    • By Zane

      Zane Merva
      Executive Editor / Publisher, GM-Trucks.com
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    • By Zane
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      2019 Chevy Silverado & 2019 GMC Sierra Routine Maintenance Quick Reference Guide
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       
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      2019 GMC Sierra: 2019_GMC_Sierra_Owners_Manual.pdf
       
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      With High Capacity Air Cleaner: A3244C / 84121219 Without High Capacity Air Cleaner: A3246C / 84121217  
      Interior Filters
      Passenger Compartment Air Filter: CF185  
      Wiper Blades
      Drivers & Passenger Sides: 55cm / 21.7 Inches - GM Part Number 23417074  
      Spark Plugs
      2.7L L4: 12688094 / 41-106-IP 4.3L V6: 12622441 / 41-114 5.3L V8 & 6.2L V8: 12622441 / 41-114  
      Fuel Tank Sizes
      Standard / Short Box (Gas & 4WD Duramax): 24 Gallons Standard & Short Box (2WD Duramax): 22 Gallons  
      Automatic Transmission Fluid
      6-Speed: DEXRON-VI Automatic Transmission Fluid 8-Speed: DEXRON-HP Automatic Transmission Fluid 10-Speed: DEXRON ULV Automatic Transmission Fluid (GM Part Number 19352619/Canada 19352620)  
      Transfer Case Fluid
      All Models: 1.6 Quarts DEXRON-VI Automatic Transmission Fluid  
      Wheel Lug Nut Torque
      All Models: 140 lb-ft / 190 N-m
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