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Here it is! Take a look at the 2020 Chevy Silverado HD

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I understand people are interested in power and payload capability in a HD truck, but it doesn't cost anymore to make a pretty truck that it does an ugly truck.

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19 minutes ago, ammoaddict said:

I understand people are interested in power and payload capability in a HD truck, but it doesn't cost anymore to make a pretty truck that it does an ugly truck.

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Agree.  Someone (wasn’t me that thought it up) once said “beauty is in the eyes of the beholder” 😉...

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Agree.  Someone (wasn’t me that thought it up) once said “beauty is in the eyes of the beholder” ...
I once said, beauty is only sheet metal deep, but ugly goes plum to the frame.

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They need to give it more of the look of the current Tahoe and Suburban.. It would be much more appealing. 

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Wow this is ugly........ 

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15 hours ago, ammoaddict said:

I once said, beauty is only sheet metal deep, but ugly goes plum to the frame.

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Lol, a pretty good parable of the original.  Not bad, not bad 😉....

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The wheels look like they came from a Tacoma.....

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On 12/9/2018 at 1:16 PM, Gudennuff said:

Opinions vary.  For my money it needs to excel in all 4 of those areas.

EXACTLY!!! Is it too much to ask to have a truck (for $60K plus) look as good as it performs? 

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On 12/9/2018 at 1:16 PM, Gudennuff said:

Opinions vary.  For my money it needs to excel in all 4 of those areas.

Your first sentence contradicts your second sentence.  Just saying.... 😏

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On 12/7/2018 at 9:43 AM, BIGDOGx said:

Looks insanely better, truly whoever designed the 2020 model should be fired imo!

 

I don't understand why ford and gm have this need to always make their 2500 and up lines about as ugly as can be.

there is actually a perfectly good reason why: PROFIT. they make the work trucks as ugly as possible to try to push you the high dollar trim levels (preferably the High Country/King Ranch/Denali for maximum profit) to have better looking sheetmetal.

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4 hours ago, truckofwinandawesome said:

there is actually a perfectly good reason why: PROFIT. they make the work trucks as ugly as possible to try to push you the high dollar trim levels (preferably the High Country/King Ranch/Denali for maximum profit) to have better looking sheetmetal.

Nothing new about that.  A common marketing strategy used across a smorgasbord board of products.  

 

But, back to the cosmetic discussion; and my comrades expressing a desire for a “nice looking, a good looking truck, even a pretty truck, lol 🙄...  Anyway, an example, perhaps not on this thread but on others discussing what folks want on the new Silverado design there has been a lot of chatter about wheel well design.  Some think the rectangular cut used by GM since the old post WWII Advanced truck is good (I can’t bring myself to use the word pretty when discussing trucks, sorry) looking.  Others think it’s butt ugly and want GM to go to a round cut similar to what Ford uses.  So, which is it?  Rectangular or round?  Fly $h!t in pepper if you ask me 🥴....

 

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1 hour ago, Snoringbear said:

Nothing new about that.  A common marketing strategy used across a smorgasbord board of products.  

 

But, back to the cosmetic discussion; and my comrades expressing a desire for a “nice looking, a good looking truck, even a pretty truck, lol 🙄...  Anyway, an example, perhaps not on this thread but on others discussing what folks want on the new Silverado design there has been a lot of chatter about wheel well design.  Some think the rectangular cut used by GM since the old post WWII Advanced truck is good (I can’t bring myself to use the word pretty when discussing trucks, sorry) looking.  Others think it’s butt ugly and want GM to go to a round cut similar to what Ford uses.  So, which is it?  Rectangular or round?  Fly $h!t in pepper if you ask me 🥴....

 

Yes Comrade, I want my truck to look as good as it performs. Based on your profile, that truck of yours 2015 LTZ 6.2 4x4 probably looks bada$$ too. Ehh the wheel well debate will never die, had the 2008 Avalanche with the more rounded Suburban look, wondered why the Silverado and Sierra went to the rectangular look, didn’t like it then and now I own one...go figure lol. Love the pepper comment, gonna share that with the GF right before breakfast 😁 

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1 hour ago, SS502 said:

Yes Comrade, I want my truck to look as good as it performs. Based on your profile, that truck of yours 2015 LTZ 6.2 4x4 probably looks bada$$ too. Ehh the wheel well debate will never die, had the 2008 Avalanche with the more rounded Suburban look, wondered why the Silverado and Sierra went to the rectangular look, didn’t like it then and now I own one...go figure lol. Love the pepper comment, gonna share that with the GF right before breakfast 😁 

 

1 hour ago, SS502 said:

Yes Comrade, I want my truck to look as good as it performs. Based on your profile, that truck of yours 2015 LTZ 6.2 4x4 probably looks bada$$ too. Ehh the wheel well debate will never die, had the 2008 Avalanche with the more rounded Suburban look, wondered why the Silverado and Sierra went to the rectangular look, didn’t like it then and now I own one...go figure lol. Love the pepper comment, gonna share that with the GF right before breakfast 😁 

Lol, thanks.  I’m just a good ole Texas farm boy at heart.  My three adult daughters are Dallas suburbanites to the core who roll their eyes when I drop one of my down-home country sayings around their friends.  They say I’m embarrassing which I completely agree with and thoroughly enjoy being, heh, heh 😂.  But, back to the serious stuff - trucks.  About looks; never said I wasn’t a hypocrite.  I do consider esthetics for sure but it’s never been a show stopper for me.  Anyway, kinda wish GM still built the Avalanche as I only tow a 6,500 lb TT with my LTZ and an Avalanche with the 6.2L  8 or 10 spd tranny would probably do nicely and the rear coil springs would ride much better for my boney old butt than the rear leafs in the Silverado.  Maybe I should check out the Ram next time.  Did I really say that?  Lol 😏...

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2 minutes ago, Snoringbear said:

 

Lol, thanks.  I’m just a good ole Texas farm boy at heart.  My three adult daughters are Dallas suburbanites to the core who roll their eyes when I drop one of my down-home country sayings around their friends.  They say I’m embarrassing which I completely agree with and thoroughly enjoy being, heh, heh 😂.  But, back to the serious stuff - trucks.  About looks; never said I wasn’t a hypocrite.  I do consider esthetics for sure but it’s never been a show stopper for me.  Anyway, kinda wish GM still built the Avalanche as I only tow a 6,500 lb TT with my LTZ and an Avalanche with the 6.2L  8 or 10 spd tranny would probably do nicely and the rear coil springs would ride much better for my boney old butt than the rear leafs in the Silverado.  Maybe I should check out the Ram next time.  Did I really say that?  Lol 😏...

Ummm, yes you did but even me being a somewhat loyal GM (truck division) owner...I’ve actually looked at one and it was very, very nice. I want too keen on all the leather work and for me the informational center was just too big. Looking at that with my old eyes assisted by bi-focals would make me dizzy 😁👍 The Avalanche was really a nice vehicle for us and even with the 5.3 it towed my 24 foot bow rider pretty good although here in Florida we don’t have mountain type terrain. I see my old LTZ Avy every day and wish I’d have kept it to augment my stable 🤔

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Its a MAC, Bull dog ugly, only a mama can love him.....

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    • By Gorehamj

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      There is a lot of new and notable capabilities in the 2020 Sierra HD, so we are breaking down the key elements into bullet points.

      Here are the 2020 Sierra HD general features. Trailering features come below:
      A segment-exclusive available 15-inch-diagonal head-up display that offers useful trailering information, including vehicle speed, navigation information and an inclinometer display for the road grade.
      An available segment-first Rear Camera Mirror.
      MultiPro, the world’s first six-function tailgate, allows easier loading, unloading and bed access and is available on all trim levels.
      A larger, commanding design that provides more room for cargo and occupants.
      Best-in-class Crew Cab front headroom and legroom for the driver and other front-row occupants.
      An all-new, segment-first, Allison 10-speed automatic transmission mated to the legendary 6.6L Duramax turbo diesel.

      2020 Sierra HD Advantages Over Prior Model Include:
      A longer wheelbase, a taller, more dominant hood line and taller overall height.
      A larger grille and complementing functional hood scoop to feed an advanced cooling system for the Duramax turbo diesel. 
      Class-leading heavy-duty cargo bed volume and corner tie-downs with a new, available 120-volt power outlet.
      One-inch-lower bed lift-in height compared to the 2019 Sierra Heavy Duty, providing easier loading and fifth-wheel and gooseneck trailer hitching.
      New, segment-exclusive cargo bed side steps on all box styles, located in front of the rear wheel openings, that complement integrated CornerSteps in the rear bumper to improve access to the cargo area.
      World’s first six-function MultiPro tailgate available on all trim levels and standard on SLT, AT4 and Denali.
       
      GMC’s Duramax turbo diesel and new 10-speed Allison automatic transmission pairing will offer superior towing confidence. GMC isn't providing exact specs today, but says that the 2020 Sierra HD will have capabilities well in excess of 30,000 pounds. This is the first HD segment 10-speed. The Duramax 6.6L turbo-diesel engine develops an SAE-certified 445 horsepower and 910 lb-ft of torque. 

      2020 Sierra HD Trailering Features:
      An enhanced ProGrade Trailering system featuring class-leading available 15 camera views, including a segment-first transparent trailer view to virtually see through a trailer in tow.
      An available smart trailer designed to integrate the iN∙Command control system from ASA Electronics provides the ability to monitor and control select functions of compatibly equipped trailers through the myGMC mobile app.
      Auto Electric Park Brake to automatically apply the parking brake to help maintain truck position when hitching.
      All-new Park Grade Hold Assist enhances hill hold by using braking effort at each wheel for an extended period of time.
      All-new larger, door-mounted trailering mirrors with a four-bar link providing power extend and retract for the driver and passenger sides.
      Integrated trailer brake controller that works with the trailer profile in the Trailering App to recall a specified trailer’s most recent gain setting.
      Tow/Haul mode that remains engaged on the next key-on cycle, for up to four hours; includes a reminder the feature is engaged.
      Hill Start Assist and Hill Descent Control.
      Trailer Sway Control.
      Auto Grade Braking and Diesel Exhaust Braking.
      Digital Variable Steering Assist that dynamically optimizes power steering according to driving scenarios, including trailering, and enables features like road pull compensation.
      Trailering Info Label placed on the driver’s door jamb that clearly calls out the truck’s specific trailering information, including curb weight, GVWR, GCWR, maximum payload, maximum tongue weight and rear GAWR.

      When Can You Get One?
      The 2020 Sierra HD will go on sale "later this year" in 2500HD and 3500HD dual rear wheel and single rear wheel configurations. Flint Assembly in Flint, Michigan, will be the manufacturing location for the 2020 Sierra Heavy Duty. 
       
       
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