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And given that one can get a 2500 with virtually the same package of goodies as a 1500, and probably for equal or even less money, it seems more wise to just get a 2500 if towing any more than 5000-6000 lb.   
 
One of the biggest issues when it come to the towing part is the payload part of the equation.  My 2500, full of fuel and two people and 2-300 lb of gear in the back still has about 2300 lb of payload remaining.  And the 2500 comes with a 36 gallon fuel tank standard.   


Absolutely correct! Some are quick to jump and say “oh, my 1500 can easily tow all that” BS! Just like the Tundra can tow the Space Shuttle and my neighbor had one of those Tundras and complained how horrible it was when he was towing a 5K lb trailer, LMAO! Diesel is the best way to tow, period.


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13 minutes ago, TXGREEK said:

 


That’s a negative on driving to fast. As I’ve already posted, I was extremely stressed out towing as it was. Actually it was more like 4.5mpgs. If you’re wanting to tow, 1500’s are maxed out at 5-6K and the rest would be the upgrades helping but if you’re looking to tow more often then 3/4 DMax or any Diesel is the best tow vehicle period. I towed a 9K+ 5th wheel and barely noticed it in the back.
Don’t forget that it’s not just the weight of the trailer but the added weight of everything inside which believe me, you’re definitely going to be buying and adding a bunch of stuff in order to make your trip as pleasant as possible AND all the gear in and on the truck plus the added weight of people in the truck. These trucks are rated as empty not occupied and loaded up.


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That’s crazy mpg!  But I guess it makes sense, that trailer looks like a flat wall and it weighs about twice as much as the one I tow and I routinely get 8-11 mpg driving very conservatively.     You would have to fill up like every hour lol!

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That’s crazy mpg!  But I guess it makes sense, that trailer looks like a flat wall and it weighs about twice as much as the one I tow and I routinely get 8-11 mpg driving very conservatively.     You would have to fill up like every hour lol!


You’re correct lol. And, to make things worse, I was driving a truck with the advertised ability to tow over 9klbs. Ha! Even put on Bilsteins and brand new Michelin’s on it, didn’t work. It’s a gimmicky sales job even buying into truck or trailer


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When I last had a travel trailer, I towed with a 2003 Expedition with the Triton 5.4 motor. Rated towing capacity was 9400 lbs. Trailer was about 32ft overall and weighed in around 7500lbs ready to camp. I had an Equal-I-zer WDH and electric brakes.

 

It towed just fine and returned around 10mpg. I would usually keep it in the 60-65mph band on the highway.

 

I upgraded to a Class A motorhome with a Cummins 8.3 diesel, flat towing our Equinox. That combination would return around 8.5mpg.

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13 hours ago, silverado_colatown said:

 I go to camping world website enter my vehicle VIN and it says I can only tow 5500 lbs.  

My guess is their website is conservative and give you the lowest tow rating for that vehicle regardless of what configuration.  I tried myself and put in my VIN and it found two, so it's clearly not VIN specific but just to know what type of vehicle you have. I have 6.2 and tells me my tow limit is 6,100, when per the owners manual it's 9,100

 

Per the owners manual your truck as described has a maximum trailer weight limit of 9,400 lbs. with a GCWR of 15,000. Your door jam sticker will give you axel ratings and maximum payolad as well.  Strictly by the numbers, you can tow 300 lbs more than I can with my 6.2. 

 

image.png.84526ac3f718c2b20013aeb7b57db52e.png

 

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17 hours ago, greatmizzou said:

Some people raise their expectations too high and expect to drive 70-80mph down the highway like they used to.  Try 55 mph.   Throwing this out there, if you were in a 1500 getting 5mph I’d imagine you were driving too fast.  

 

5 hours ago, greatmizzou said:

That’s crazy mpg!  But I guess it makes sense, that trailer looks like a flat wall and it weighs about twice as much as the one I tow and I routinely get 8-11 mpg driving very conservatively.     You would have to fill up like every hour lol!

when you are moving a constant speed on a freeway, the air resistance is your biggest factor in MPG, not the weight. I have not towed a TT, but I did have a 6'-6" tall enclosed toy trailer. My truck would barely notice it driving around town, but once you get over 60 mph it felt like I was pulling a 12 bottom plow. And that one oven had the slightly V shaped front. If I was ever going to buy a TT, I would make damn sure the front of it was curved to be as aerodynamic as possible. A brick is not aerodynamic, and pulling one is the easiest way to kill your MPG even when empty.

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7 hours ago, TXGREEK said:

If you’re wanting to tow, 1500’s are maxed out at 5-6K 

 

That's not a fair statement at all.  How the 1500 is equipped (regardless of brand) and what you are towing from an aerodynamic perspective makes a big difference.  I haven't towed with my '18 yet since I just got it, but I've towed our boat through the Tennessee mountains on the freeway multiple times with my last two trucks (first was a 1st Gen Avalanche with the LM7 5.3L, 4L60E transmission and 3.73's).  With the Avalanche, my first go around the boat was at its lightest at a little under 5000lbs, but I had a crew of 5 plus the bed and boat packed full.  I estimate my boat + gear weight was right around 7000lbs or a bit more.  Returned around 8-9MPG and could do 75.  This is a wake boat with a tower, wake racks, 4 tower speakers...not some little runabout that's much more sleek to tow.

 

My 2nd truck was an Escalade EXT (2nd Generation, 6.2L L92, 6L80E).  Boat, due to additional lead ballast, grew to about 5200 before gear.  I only did two trips towing there with that rig, but both were in the high 6000lb range with people/gear/boat.  Again, zero issue doing 75.  Motor didn't have to rev as much as the LM7 did in the Avalanche...but it still returned the exact same mileage.

 

In both cases the tow is rock steady.  Only uneasy moments is narrow construction paths, which would be the same regardless of tow rig.  My expectation is my Sierra, having more HP and less weight, should tow even better and I'm betting will drink a little less fuel.

 

I realize my examples aren't a travel trailer - which I have no interest in owning - but I'm hauling weight exceeding your recommendation without issue and don't have the advantage of a WDH with a boat that has surge brakes.

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That's not a fair statement at all.  How the 1500 is equipped (regardless of brand) and what you are towing from an aerodynamic perspective makes a big difference.  I haven't towed with my '18 yet since I just got it, but I've towed our boat through the Tennessee mountains on the freeway multiple times with my last two trucks (first was a 1st Gen Avalanche with the LM7 5.3L, 4L60E transmission and 3.73's).  With the Avalanche, my first go around the boat was at its lightest at a little under 5000lbs, but I had a crew of 5 plus the bed and boat packed full.  I estimate my boat + gear weight was right around 7000lbs or a bit more.  Returned around 8-9MPG and could do 75.  This is a wake boat with a tower, wake racks, 4 tower speakers...not some little runabout that's much more sleek to tow.
 
My 2nd truck was an Escalade EXT (2nd Generation, 6.2L L92, 6L80E).  Boat, due to additional lead ballast, grew to about 5200 before gear.  I only did two trips towing there with that rig, but both were in the high 6000lb range with people/gear/boat.  Again, zero issue doing 75.  Motor didn't have to rev as much as the LM7 did in the Avalanche...but it still returned the exact same mileage.
 
In both cases the tow is rock steady.  Only uneasy moments is narrow construction paths, which would be the same regardless of tow rig.  My expectation is my Sierra, having more HP and less weight, should tow even better and I'm betting will drink a little less fuel.
 
I realize my examples aren't a travel trailer - which I have no interest in owning - but I'm hauling weight exceeding your recommendation without issue and don't have the advantage of a WDH with a boat that has surge brakes.


Though I understand, a boat is not the same thing as a travel trailer. Travel Trailers are nowhere near as aerodynamic as a boat being hauled. Years ago, i towed a very large ski boat with an old bronco and didn’t slap me around like towing a TT. Not saying it can’t be done but I’m only giving my personal experience and it was a horrible one. I traded in my DMax for the 18, 6.2 SLT CC and am not interested in towing anything larger than a ski boat or average size trailer. Again, Just my experience


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21 hours ago, silverado_colatown said:

Looking to purchase a travel trailer and I'm trying to determine my towing capacity.  All the numbers make my head hurt!  I read the owners manual and it looks like I can tow 9100 lbs, I go to camping world website enter my vehicle VIN and it says I can only tow 5500 lbs.  Really confused and hoping someone can help me determine my tow capacity.  Here are my truck build sheet specs:

 

Model: CC15543-2018 SILVERADO 1500 2WD CREW CAB

L83 - ENGINE, 5.3L V8 ECOTEC3

MYC - TRANSMISSION, 6 SPD AUTOMATIC

GU6 - REAR AXLE 3.42 RATIO

Q5U - WHEELS, 17" BRIGHT - MACHINED ALUMINUM

PDU - ALL STAR EDITION * TRAILERING EQUIPMENT PKG INCL AUTO
LOCKING REAR DIFFERENTIAL *

Z85 - SUSPENSION PACKAGE

 

Thanks!

Your Maximum Trailer Weight is 9,400 pounds.  Your GCWR is 15,000 pounds.

 

To find out how much your rig weighed from the factory, subtract the maximum cargo capacity from the GVWR.  Cargo capacity is found on the Tire and Load Information Label inside the door or door jamb (page 239).

 

Just because it says 9,400 pounds doesn't mean you can pull 9,400 pounds.  Read your owner's manual, I did!  Start on Page 300.

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I tow a Forest River 201bhxl with my 17 crewcab 5.3 8 speed 4x4. Dry weight is 4233 pounds and loaded is around 5k. 

 

It tows great but you can definitely feel it behind the truck. I use a WD hitch and no sway control. I get 10-12 mpg towing. 

 

If i ever upgraded campers I would definitely want to upgrade the rear suspension or get a 6.2. 

 

We have a blast with the kids in this camper. Here we are setup at the Seven Peaks Festival last year. 

0868F664-2F56-43BE-9D5B-0007C57196FD.jpeg

Edited by Bikemobile
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Can it be done? Yep. 

 

Will it be comfortable and easy at highway speeds and wind? Nope. 

 

In this picture I towed it 55 miles, but the trailer was empty and the truck was virtually empty too. There is no way I would want to tow it fully loaded with gear. 

 

Now that being said, and as another poster said, if you're towing only once and a while (I tow that trailer only twice all year to and from my lake lot) and it's relatively local, it would probably be fine.  But pack light and have a really good weight-distribution hitch and go slow. 

IMG_0174.JPG

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11 hours ago, Brummie99 said:

 

I upgraded to a Class A motorhome with a Cummins 8.3 diesel, flat towing our Equinox. That combination would return around 8.5mpg.

I wonder if anyone else sees that 8.5 mpg as really sad.  I can get almost the same mpg from my Freightliner Class 8 semi truck with a 53' trailer on the back with 30,000 lb of cargo in it.  It is really sad when a 8.3L Cummins gets no better mpg than a motor that is over 50% larger, turning more wheels, and grossing more weight.

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I wonder if anyone else sees that 8.5 mpg as really sad.  I can get almost the same mpg from my Freightliner Class 8 semi truck with a 53' trailer on the back with 30,000 lb of cargo in it.  It is really sad when a 8.3L Cummins gets no better mpg than a motor that is over 50% larger, turning more wheels, and grossing more weight.


Completely different power train setup and body configuration, semi is more aerodynamic than a box on wheels.


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20 minutes ago, TXGREEK said:

 


Completely different power train setup and body configuration, semi is more aerodynamic than a box on wheels.


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Not any more aerodynamic than  a Class A motorhome, which the comparison being made.   Actually, the reverse of your assertion.

 

Go down to a commercial trailer location and take a close look at a 53 foot long / 8.5 foot wide / 13.5 foot tall dry van trailer and see if it looks any more aerodynamic than a Class A motorhome.   Especially the back end.  Please post pictures.   Maybe the over 5 million miles I have been pulling them around, I lost perspective.  A  Class A motorhome does not have 3-4 foot gap midway like there is between semi tractor and trailer to generate turbulence.  The Motorhome is a one piece deal with uniform air flow.  And then there is the gap between bottom of that 53 foot trailer and the ground in comparison to that motorhome.  Do you know of any motorhomes that have an over 3 foot distance between the bottom and sides of the motorhome and the ground?  If so, again, please post pictures so we can all see this oddity.    And let's see... how many tires have to be turned on the motorhome, each one offering resistance?   Still waiting to see a Class A motorhome with 18 wheels and tires.... all of them 11" wide on 22.5" rims.      Please post pictures.

 

And lest I forget... not many motorhomes have a heavy duty 5 foot tall / 8.5 foot wide AliArc cattle guard on the front of them like I have on the front of my semi truck that also tends to mess with the frontal streamline air flow just a wee little bit. 

Edited by Cowpie
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