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drabe3

Threadlocker on caliper bracket bolts

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Anti-Seize is a lubricant?  Whatever, keep putting it on your brake hardware if it makes you feel better.......

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13 minutes ago, mookdoc6 said:

Anti-Seize is a lubricant?  Whatever, keep putting it on your brake hardware if it makes you feel better.......

I know you're referring to diyer2, but I want to be clear about me putting anti-seize on my brake bolts. It is only applied to the threads in a thin layer that won't glop onto any part of the pads/calipers. For the sliding pins I use grease for lubrication. I took the OP's question as what gets used on the threads. There is nothing wrong with blue threadlocker being used. I was just speaking from my experience of having rusted/seized bolts in the past and never having an issue with bolts coming loose after applying anti-seize on the threads.

 

This is hotly debated in a lot of automotive forums. There are guys who use nothing, guys who have used anti-seize for 30+ years with no issues, and guys who have only used threadlocker. The real question is does blue threadlocker prevent rusting (the OP said he lives in NY where they salt their roads)? From other replies on this thread, people are saying it has the same properties as anti-seize and won't allow rusting. Living in an area with salted roads and precipitation throughout winter, I think we can all agree applying nothing is a mistake unless you replace your brakes often.

 

To the OP,  sounds like applying blue threadlocker should do the trick based on what others are saying about it preventing rust. You'll have peace of mind that the bolts won't come out and should not have a rust issue next time you do your brakes.

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On 2/25/2019 at 1:15 AM, HeySkippyDog said:

If I put anything on the threads of bolts like that, it would be anti-seize and nothing else.

I did not use anything on them when I did brakes on my 2014, but I live inland in FL and we do not have salt exposure.

Torqueing them to about 35-40 ft-lbs is probably all it needs. There were 3 of the bolts if I remember it right. I did not put a torque wrench on them, I have a pretty good calibrated hand. Nothing has worked loose.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J727A using Tapatalk
 

Can't speak to the K2; I haven't had to touch my brakes yet, but on my 2008, torque specs called for 100 ft-lbs on the caliper brackets and 50ft-lbs on the caliper mounting bolts.

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1 hour ago, midwestdenaliguy said:

I know you're referring to diyer2, but I want to be clear about me putting anti-seize on my brake bolts. It is only applied to the threads in a thin layer that won't glop onto any part of the pads/calipers. For the sliding pins I use grease for lubrication. I took the OP's question as what gets used on the threads. There is nothing wrong with blue threadlocker being used. I was just speaking from my experience of having rusted/seized bolts in the past and never having an issue with bolts coming loose after applying anti-seize on the threads.

 

This is hotly debated in a lot of automotive forums. There are guys who use nothing, guys who have used anti-seize for 30+ years with no issues, and guys who have only used threadlocker. The real question is does blue threadlocker prevent rusting (the OP said he lives in NY where they salt their roads)? From other replies on this thread, people are saying it has the same properties as anti-seize and won't allow rusting. Living in an area with salted roads and precipitation throughout winter, I think we can all agree applying nothing is a mistake unless you replace your brakes often.

 

To the OP,  sounds like applying blue threadlocker should do the trick based on what others are saying about it preventing rust. You'll have peace of mind that the bolts won't come out and should not have a rust issue next time you do your brakes.

Understand and yes he should use BLUE 242.

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36 minutes ago, dkjbama said:

Can't speak to the K2; I haven't had to touch my brakes yet, but on my 2008, torque specs called for 100 ft-lbs on the caliper brackets and 50ft-lbs on the caliper mounting bolts.

But not with anti seize on the threads.

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Guys, Please use Loctite 242 Blue on your caliper bolts.  Use Loctite 262,272 on Your Caliper Brackets!  This will not cause rust and has properties to inhibit rust/corrosion!
 
Your not going to anneal the hardware at 500f to break the caliper bolts free!  PLEASE DO NOT USE ANTI-SEIZE on your break hardware!!!!!  Absolutely NOT!



You’re probably one that is completely against using anti-seize on Lug bolts/nuts too...


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1 hour ago, mookdoc6 said:

Anti-Seize is a lubricant? 

Actually? Yes. Have a look at the MSDS for you favorite. Nickel, copper, graphite or aluminum in a heavy paraffinic carrier. In fact it is over half heavy distillate. If you consult someone like ARP Fastener Corp it's such a good lubricant that it needs to be taken into consideration in adjusting torque specs.  

 

This will make you butt pucker. I use nickel ease on sparkplug threads in alloy heads. Started this after my first seized plug cost me a cylinder head on an antique Triumph. 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, JCKustoms said:

 

 


You’re probably one that is completely against using anti-seize on Lug bolts/nuts too...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

 

Me?  No, I am not against Anti-Seize at all.... I am against that product being used in places where it should not be used?

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Can't speak to the K2; I haven't had to touch my brakes yet, but on my 2008, torque specs called for 100 ft-lbs on the caliper brackets and 50ft-lbs on the caliper mounting bolts.
I was referring to the caliper bolts. I left the brackets in place.

If 50 is the GM spec, I wasn't terribly far off the mark. Higher grade steel in the bolts can handle higher values.

But to put things in perspective, the caliper would need to be able to move laterally and overcome 3x the clamping force of a bolt at whatever the torque value is to come loose. The caliper can't move laterally, the rotor is in the way. So it can't exert really any force against the bolts axially. The bolts would only be subject to forces in shear along its length, and there is plenty of thread engagement at the end for that to never cause backout.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J727A using Tapatalk

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In essence, as long as you pull them "slip-a-fart" tight, your brake caliper is not gonna liberate itself from your vehicle. But, as an engineer I understand that all things must be quantifiable for consistency and CYA situations.

The manufacturer understands my point of view as well - anybody ever seen a spare tire lug wrench that verifies torque? The fact of it is the lugs don't have to be insanely tight - there are 5,6,8 or more of them. The wheel is not able to exert a side load strong enough to break that.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J727A using Tapatalk

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