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Catch Can Skeptic


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1 hour ago, Morpheus said:

, there are tons of articles out where catch can systems can fail causing an over pressure of the oil system. 

Please post or link to said tons of articles when you get a chance. 

Thanks 

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Please post or link to said tons of articles when you get a chance. 
Thanks 

For any subject go to your browser and type in your search. I did it's like anything else you will not get anything convincing either way, just like here. Although it seems more pro than con. I would go to my servicing dealer and ask them if it would affect the warranty. Then install accordingly or not.


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I would prefer the person that made the blanket statement do the work and provide the proof.

I can see that. I do my research before I respond if I have any doubts. If someone questioned my statements do the research and prove me wrong. I know we’re anonymous I don’t come on here to mislead. So if I doubt someone’s statement I don’t insult them I do the research, assuming they’re right unless otherwise proven.


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If everyone is that concerned with build-up, why not just do what others have suggested and just use that CRC GDI Cleaner? Seems like $10 or so for a can is pretty cheap to run through there every year...I confess to having NO experience with catch cans but I do like reading others' experience with them. I, too, am still not really convinced that collecting that crap is really "better" for your intake. I will admit, however, that the argument of "look at all that intake diarrhea in there, how can keeping that stuff out be bad?" is a pretty compelling argument.

 

 

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11 hours ago, KARNUT said:


For any subject go to your browser and type in your search. I did it's like anything else you will not get anything convincing either way, just like here. Although it seems more pro than con. I would go to my servicing dealer and ask them if it would affect the warranty. Then install accordingly or not.


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Same here.  Ive posted a link to another topic on this forum with a lot of the same information I spent hours researching.  My truck blew a rear main seal, oil cooler line, and blew out the silicone on the oil pan and RMS housing.  Shit like that doesn't happen unless there is a damn good reason.  The reason I was told and have found to be true is an over pressurized crank case.  

Also with doing the research I also learned exactly HOW the PCV system works and how the valve itself works.  Understanding that it's spring loaded and its operation correlates with load and RPM also tells me that unless you're running at 4K RPM at all times you really aren't pushing that much ventilation from the crank to your intake.  

 

When I removed my catch can and installed the old PCV system, I noticed the same kind of condensation build up in the bottom of my throttle body as what would accumulate in my catch can.  I emptied that can every 1000 miles.  It never got full but it would get 50-75% full in that time frame dependent on temperature and usage.  When installing that catch can I never had puddles of anything accumulating in my TB.  I didn't take a picture as I don't typically think posting it for Instagram or to a forum when working on things so the "evidence" is solely upon my eyes only which may be a travesty with this topic and others regarding catch cans.  

Anyway, I quoted you but hope Jacoby reads this post as well.  I mean no ill will with posts.  I post with the purpose to express my experiences in hope that it saves people time and money and maybe even expensive repairs.  I don't think that most people post with the intent to viciously hurt someone.  But, as well all know, ignorance toward how vehicles work and peoples mechanical aptitude can really shift a majority of people in a dangerous direction, like maybe installing a catch can where it's not needed.  

 

Good day to everyone.  

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Most of everything I researched is in this article on this forum.  


You’re correct and thanks for posting. I’ve read other forums same thing happened but I always assumed it was due to incorrect installation.


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1 hour ago, BigBlueLB756 said:

Install one.

Do not install one.

Mod.

Drive stock.

 

You choose.  It's your vehicle.

Freedom of choice.

Yes this is true but I think everyone would like to find out if their modification is actually beneficial or at least not harmful.  Freedom of choice is one thing but you can't make good choices if you do not have good and accurate information on which to base your decision.

 

This is why I started this thread.  Catch cans make logical sense but there is data that is missing that makes me suspicious.  Unfortunately, I do not have the detailed engineering knowledge to call BS on the theory.  

 

I have been going back and forth on the issue.  Right now I am leaning on the negative side.  If they really were working someone would have performed a study to demonstrate it. 

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IMO, the results are shown in every picture I see that shows what has accumulated and been captured in these cans of various manufacturer, either big-buck or [email protected]$$.  I don't care to have any of that put into the combustion chambers of my engines.

But that's just me.  JMHO.

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  • 2 months later...

Just a heads up with catch cans in cold weather.

 

1.) Drain them immediately after your done driving for the day while the contents are still warm and will flow out.

2.) Make sure you catch can system is mounted close to the engine or exhaust so it operates at engine temps or close.

3.) Most important is not to mount catch can far away from engine heat and make sure the can is designed to coalesce efficiently in heat.

4.) Some people even run a cloth winter sock on the catch can or wrap them to keep them warm and insulated.

5.) Never leave the contents in the can from the day before in freezing weather or can blow a seal or vc gasket if its overfull.

 

UPR Catch Cans are designed to run in the hottest locations and weather and coalesce properly in that environment 

so you will never experience any of the above issues with a UPR Catch Can if you follow the simple steps.

 

Just wanted to share. 

 

Everyone grab you UPR Catch Can Systems while the 4th Of July Sale is running and you can see the code in 

the image below or on the rotating banners of the UPR Website homepage.

 

10% OFF CODE: USA2019

 

Thank you and have a happy and safe 4th of July!

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On 7/3/2019 at 12:42 PM, [email protected] said:

Just a heads up with catch cans in cold weather.

 

1.) Drain them immediately after your done driving for the day while the contents are still warm and will flow out.

2.) Make sure you catch can system is mounted close to the engine or exhaust so it operates at engine temps or close.

3.) Most important is not to mount catch can far away from engine heat and make sure the can is designed to coalesce efficiently in heat.

4.) Some people even run a cloth winter sock on the catch can or wrap them to keep them warm and insulated.

5.) Never leave the contents in the can from the day before in freezing weather or can blow a seal or vc gasket if its overfull.

 

UPR Catch Cans are designed to run in the hottest locations and weather and coalesce properly in that environment 

so you will never experience any of the above issues with a UPR Catch Can if you follow the simple steps.

 

Just wanted to share. 

 

Everyone grab you UPR Catch Can Systems while the 4th Of July Sale is running and you can see the code in 

the image below or on the rotating banners of the UPR Website homepage.

 

10% OFF CODE: USA2019

 

Thank you and have a happy and safe 4th of July!

I put it in the spare battery spot in the engine bay and it seems to get warm enough there.

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15 hours ago, Rock1500 said:

I put it in the spare battery spot in the engine bay and it seems to get warm enough there.

That location is ok if you do not experience extreme winter cold and you drain the catch can regularly. I just try to keep the UPR Catch Can System in a warmer location as we have taken so much time to develop the best internal coalescing system with multiple stages of coalescing screens, filters and chambers with different holes and baffles throughout the internal diffuser system. Many boast of how many chambers  and other variables that mean nothing. We have worked very hard to ensure the oil coalescing with a few friends from FRAM and they told us the science behind proper oil coalescing and engine temps that allowed us to build the best internal design and performing catch cans in the marketplace. 

 

As long as the location works for you that is all that matters and if you need to adjust you can move your setup closer or further away from the engine heat depending on the efficiency of the catch can.

 

BTW, hope everyone had a great 4th!

 

Joe

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