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Posted (edited)

Just got back from store and noticed oil cap calls for 0W-20. (I was driving other truck while getting oil ;-)

 

Local walmart only had 5W-20. It is Dexos approved (Mobil 1 Full synthetic 5W-20) 

 

Anyone running 5W-20 in their 2014-2018?

 

Guess I could hold off a few days and exchange.

 

I'm currently at 7500 miles on my 2018 6.2L and oil life is at 23%.

 

First oil change was at 4500 miles.

 

 

Edited by 2018GMC

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Yes I have one "free" oil change left but my local dealer is booked out and I was not impressed when they did the first oil change.

 

Picked up M1-212A filter.

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I will likey swap to 5w20 next time on my two 6.2 vehicles. 0w20 in the deep South is likely on the thin side. If 5w oil burns up an oil pump it was probably weak anyway.


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You’ll be fine

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Use the 5w-20. No issues there. They’re both a 20 weight at operating temp.


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0W20 is a 0 weight oil with a polymeric thickener to prevent it from getting thinner than a 20 weight at 212 F. 

5W20 is a 5 weight oil with a polymeric thickener to prevent it from getting thinner than a 20 weight at 212 F. 

 

I believe most people think that the oil is a 20W with enough thickener to prevent thinning below the lower number.

 

It's fine to interchange them.  

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, Grumpy Bear said:

0W20 is a 0 weight oil with a polymeric thickener to prevent it from getting thinner than a 20 weight at 212 F. 

5W20 is a 5 weight oil with a polymeric thickener to prevent it from getting thinner than a 20 weight at 212 F. 

 

I believe most people think that the oil is a 20W with enough thickener to prevent thinning below the lower number.

 

It's fine to interchange them.  

No, a 0w20 is likely something like a 12 or 14 weight synthetic base oil and it will likely use viscosity modifiers (polymeric thickeners) to provide the resistance to flow of a 20 weight oil.   There is no "0" weight.  The numbers in front of the "w" are cold flow ratings (not weights) based on Centistokes at particular cold points.  typically not to exceed 6000 cSt at a particular temp.   Only the number after the "w" is the weight rating of the oil and that is based on the kinematic viscosity at 100C.   A 5w20 will not exceed 6000 cSt down to -30C and a 0w20 will not exceed 6000 cSt down to -35C.  Both have the same kinematic viscosity at 100C.  

 

Viscosity is resistance to flow.  Even water has a viscosity rating of around 1.5 "weight" at 25C.  There is no fluid that has zero resistance to flow, hence there is no such thing as a "0" weight.  There is a 0 cold flow rating though showing that cold flow rating and viscosity are not the same critter.  For instance, while water as a kinematic viscosity of 1.5, it will exceed 6000 cSt at 0C because it freezes.  

 

And let's take your assertion a step further.  There are several 10w30 oils on the market that are 30 weight oils with a cold flow rating of 10, and because of the base oil that they are made from, use no viscosity modifiers (polymeric thickeners as you call them) whatsoever.   They qualify as straight 30 weight oils, yet exhibit the cold flow characteristics of a 10w30.  They are not 10 weight oils forced to behave as 30 weight oils. They are true 30 weight oils that will not exceed 6000 cSt down to -25C, thereby qualifying as a 10w30.

 

Always keep in mind.... the "w" in 0w20, 5w20, 5w30, 10w30, 0w30, etc does not mean weight.  It means "winter" as in cold flow.

 

All of this is fun, academically, but in the real world one can use a 5w20 even though a 0w20 is specified by the OEM because most folks never experience cold enough temperatures to justify using a 0w20.  And no dealer or OEM can tell the difference between a 0w20 and 5w20 via used oil sampling.  All they can tell is if it is a 20 weight oil based on a kinematic viscosity between 5.6 and 9.3 at 100C.   So they could tell the difference between a 20 weight oil and a 30 weight oil which has a kinematic viscosity from 9.3 to 12.5 at 100C.

Edited by Cowpie
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Cliff we are going to disagree on this. Let's start with the easy stuff. Conventional oils. I will include Group II & III synthetics. Pour points are suppressed on these last two, primarily the nature of dewaxing and not suppressants. 

 

I will refrain from arguing the definitions of weight and grade and flow and viscosity. 

 

Vis.png.4401a08cd87da2cba214706ca464a676.png

 

There is a zero GRADE. It is NOT defined by the 40 C / 102 F  spec. It's the Fluids minimum flow at 100C / 212 F AND a maximum cranking and pumping value as well at a GRADE determined temperature.

 

That number at 40C is a 'report' number for comparison purposes only

 

If you have a 0W20 oil that is in fact a zero GRADE oil displaying a maximum cranking viscosity of 6200 Centipoise @ -35 C / -31F but to meet the 20W spec it must have a min/max 100 C value between 5.6 -< 9.3 cSt. Which it can't meet as a 0  GRADE without polymeric molecules. (thickeners) to prevent the natural thinning. How much of this material is required depends on the oils

INITIAL VISCOSTIY INDEX. 

 

You might note on the chart that 0 and 5W share the 100 C minimum? Yet differ at the pumping numbers. A case of naturally high viscosity index in a mineral oil covering two grades. 

 

Group IV and V.

 

There are indeed some FLUIDS in this class that have a high enough NATURAL VISCOSITY INDEX. to cover both ends of a very small range. Maybe two GRADES. NPG Esters come to mind.

 

Mobil 1 is not one of them anymore. (IV) The OP's question. 

 

Can an oil be formulated with both a polymeric and a pour point suppressant and use an intermediate GRADE?

Yes.

That means I'm agreeing to the possibility but as neither you or I will ever know for sure. Hardly worth the call out, eh?

 

cP and cSt are not the same measurement.

cSt = cP / Density.

Density is temperature dependent. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Someone should try some 0W16, just for the lulz and to say they did, then brag about the MPG improvement brah.

 

Japan's had it forever and it's now used in US on many new cars.

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For comparison, I run 5W30 in mine.  I found the hot pressure to be almost 10psi higher with the 30wt and no loss in MPG.  It just gives me better piece of mind when towing and doing truck stuff.  I wouldnt sweat using the 5W20 oil you bought.

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Not only 0w vs 5w but why not go from 20 to 30 ?

This debate has rang long on other threads.

I want to know how many of you K2 5.3 / 6.2 owners out there run a 0w-30 or 5w-30 now for thousands of miles without AFM or engine issues.

That is the real question.

 

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2 hours ago, Sierra Dan said:

Not only 0w vs 5w but why not go from 20 to 30 ?

This debate has rang long on other threads.

I want to know how many of you K2 5.3 / 6.2 owners out there run a 0w-30 or 5w-30 now for thousands of miles without AFM or engine issues.

That is the real question.

 

Just curious Dan. If you got that information how would it change your life? Not being a wise guy. Seriously, I want to know as your one of the more steady, levelheaded guys in the community. 

 

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I've been running 5w30 Amsoil for just over half the 19k I have on the truck. No problems. AFM still active and works like it always did. Temp here never gets below 20s though, except when up skiing.

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Not only 0w vs 5w but why not go from 20 to 30 ?
This debate has rang long on other threads.
I want to know how many of you K2 5.3 / 6.2 owners out there run a 0w-30 or 5w-30 now for thousands of miles without AFM or engine issues.
That is the real question.
 


It would be great if we could all get a handle on which is better for certain driving habits versus others as well as wondering types of mpg’s certain oil is giving versus 0w20?
I’ve personally noticed a smoother running engine once I’ve 100% switched to Amsoil Signature Series but aside of forgetting to reset oil change setting lol and haven’t noticed any extra or less mpg’s after switching to Amsoil.....I haven’t done any real world testing but I would find it entertaining the thought of trying a new viscosity especially during super hot Texas months.


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20 minutes ago, ftwhite said:

I've been running 5w30 Amsoil for just over half the 19k I have on the truck. No problems. AFM still active and works like it always did. Temp here never gets below 20s though, except when up skiing.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

Here in the middle Midwest, temps often fall below 20 in winter so if I were to switch it would be a 0w-30

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