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Jedibusiness

194k miles. Transmission starting to fail.

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I just dropped my pan and changed the fluid and filter at 125k miles.. Fluid was damn near black, I am assuming it was never done. Trans shifts great after the fluid change.. 

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change the fluid again in about 5000-10000 miles if you did not flush it, there will still be plenty of old crap in there from your drop n fill. 

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  • Similar Content

    • By Jedibusiness
      I sell, fabricate, deliver, install and train workers how to use my packaging lines.  In 2015 selected 2500HD WT 6.0 as the platform to use as my office (Truck Camper) and and tow vehicle.  It provided great HD service and economical (per mile basis).  On a trip to OR noted a resonance with my thumb on the steering wheel, when engine load changed going over an overpass.  At first I thought it was roadway groves, but the rhythmic vibration stopped when manually dropping into a lower gear, increasing to 3000 RPM's. 
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      I knew it was bad and knowing a bottle of shudder stop wasn't gonna fix this, authorized repair. With high mileage, I asked about universal joint replacement, Don relayed he had a shop that could replace joint, balance the driveshaft and check the center bearing.  Also since transmission was removed, and although showing no signs of leakage, had him replace the rear oil seal as well.
       
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      Note the metal grit in the screen on the right.

       
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      Programming

       
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    • By shaneman20
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