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05 1500HD

What kind of oil

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1 hour ago, Rock1500 said:

Why every 5k? I've been like doing my pool change everytime it 25% less on the sensor and that way putting my almost 6k plus.

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IMO because if you do some reading on this site or any other GM site about any vehicles with AFM failures it’s usually  reported that the failure was a “stuck” whatever or a “clogged” whatever that is lubed by oil or has oil passed though it. So IMO with these motors with collapsible lifters, oil screens, and higher oil operating temps it’s cheap insurance if your going to keep the truck for the long haul. I still change the oil every 5k in my 01 2500HD with the indestructible 6.O so I’m just stuck on 5k. Is 5k the magic # IDK? is it 6k, 7k, or when the light lites up? IDK plenty of guys running 10k plus on the same oil without any problems...

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2 hours ago, Rock1500 said:

Why every 5k? I've been like doing my pool change everytime it 25% less on the sensor and that way putting my almost 6k plus.

Why change oil at all? Seriously. Because it's dirty? You can filter oil effectively for a very long time. In fact you can filter it cleaner than it was delivered new. Because the additives get depleted? You can buy boosters. Because it gets 'used'? You can add forever.

 

What destroys oils ability to lubricate that cannot be repaired nor reversed?

 

 

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Today's high-quality engine lubricating oils are very sophisticated. Most oils already contain precise amounts of additives blended into the lubricating oil to meet stringent performance requirements.

These oils meet performance characteristics that conform to the lubricant industry standards and are sufficient protection when used according to the recommendations. Aftermarket lubricating oil additives are not necessary to enhance engine oil performance and may in some cases reduce the oil's capability to protect the engine.

 

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6 hours ago, Grumpy Bear said:

Why change oil at all? Seriously. Because it's dirty? You can filter oil effectively for a very long time. In fact you can filter it cleaner than it was delivered new. Because the additives get depleted? You can buy boosters. Because it gets 'used'? You can add forever.

 

What destroys oils ability to lubricate that cannot be repaired nor reversed?

 

 

Hard Pass eh??????

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I’ve always ran either Mobil One, Royal Purple, or Amsoil in all of my vehicles. I’ve settled on Amsoil now with the truck as it just has a certain “better” feeling when the engine is running. IMHO there is certainly nothing wrong with the other two or even options outside of that as long as they meet or exceed GM standards. 

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Food for thought. The last 3 brands of vehicles I’ve bought new since 05 are Hyundai,GM trucks, Toyota Camry. All in the manual have oil changes above 5K miles on synthetic or semi synthetic. Only the Hyundai recommended using the severe duty. It’s just under 4K miles. With the 10-100 warranty I followed. The one with full synthetic, Camry is 10K. I’m going 5K on it. I did do extended in the 90s and early 2000s. Engines have more going on, are more expensive to work on and to replace. 5K oil changes is a wise thing to do.


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2 hours ago, Capt Bob said:

Hard Pass eh??????

KARNUT told me to mom. :rolleyes:

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Couple of anecdotal tidbits:

 

I'd mistakenly sold my X3 for a year when I bought my '17 Z71, and was fortunate enough to buy it back.  Right before I did so, the buyer had called me to take a listen (I'd continued to work on the vehicle for him) at a noise... he'd had a local shop change the oil, who clearly put in the wrong oil.  In mid January, with temps in the teens, the proper oil (0w-40 full synthetic) still flowed like water in a can, but the stuff I'd drained out took a full 15 seconds to drain down the bottom of the catch pan when tilted 90*.  The valve train was knocking ferociously.  I did a drain/fill, and once I purchased the car, took it on a couple 400 mile trips, getting the oil temps and pressure up to clear the thick stuff out of the lash adjusters, VANOS solenoids and VANOS unit.  It got better, but not perfect, so I drained out a quart and replaced it with MMO.  Within 50 miles, it was back to being sewing machine smooth.  This was at 136k miles and it now has 152k, and is still as smooth and silent as it was when I bought it back in 2012.

 

On to my '04 F150 (hold off on the torches and pitch forks).  At 140k miles, its 5.4 3v had the infamous phaser knock.  By 150k, I started to hear the death knell of timing chain rattle on cold-starts, so I knew it was time to tear it apart.  Those engines are highly susceptible to drops in oil pressure, so a full timing rebuild was in order: new timing chains, guides, tensioners, phasers, lash adjusters, roller-followers (which are floating), and oil pump (and of course dropping the front axle in order to remove the pan and clean out the oil pump pick-up screen).  The passenger side tensioner (hydraulically operated) seal was blown out, bleeding oil pressure to the cams and finally the hydraulically operated cam phasers at the END of the oiling circuits. :banghead:  The starboard side chain guide was GONE and the chain had started actually eat into the front cover, and the pickup was clogged with plastic shavings, so the new parts would have failed in pretty short order.  What does this have to do with oil?  Well, possibly nothing.  The seals blow out from bad design.  It does illustrate that not only do oils have to lubricate, but they also have to hydraulically operate the myriad of advanced engine components (VVT, AFM), so anti-foaming agents and detergents are required to keep pressure where it needs to be.  On the Ford, some of the oil passages (like the ones in the thrust bearings that meter oil  through the bearing, or the screens in the VVT solenoids) are quite tiny, barely able to discern with a finger nail, so the slightest varnish/sludge can have disastrous effects not only on longevity, but day to day driveability (of things operating, but "not quite right").  My F150 had seen a strict 3k OCI with Motorcraft 5w-20 semi-synthetic since it was new, and when I pulled the cams out, it showed.  The journals were smooth as where the cam caps, thrust bearing passages clear, with the only real varnish being where the tensioner seal was bleeding out.  Any discoloration you see in the pics (again, 150k miles) below are simply that; there was no varnish to be removed.  I've seen the same engine with the same oil with 5k and 7.5k OCIs, with exponentially more sludge.  We have an Expedition that needed a new 5.4 3v at 33k miles because it had eaten its chain, and once the VCs were removed, we couldn't even see the cam lobes through all the tar.  That had followed Fords recommended OCI of 7500, but in its 33k miles had over 5k engine hours...

 

Ask 30 people on an oil thread and you'll get 33 different answers.  Do what works for your usage and intended lifespan of the vehicle; I'll keep doing what I do, because it works and will continue to work for hundreds of thousands of miles.

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Edited by dukedkt442
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3 hours ago, elcamino said:

Today's high-quality engine lubricating oils are very sophisticated. Most oils already contain precise amounts of additives blended into the lubricating oil to meet stringent performance requirements.

 

These oils meet performance characteristics that conform to the lubricant industry standards and are sufficient protection when used according to the recommendations. Aftermarket lubricating oil additives are not necessary to enhance engine oil performance and may in some cases reduce the oil's capability to protect the engine. 

:D You cut and paste that from a GM Goodwrench text book? :D

 

People give that bold statement some thought. Especially the line, "according to the recommendations". Ask yourself: which recommendations? The oil suppliers...or...the engine manufactures? As written this line implies, if applied to the oil, that if you follow the instructions on a bottle of oil what treatment the motor receives is irrelevant. Is that really so? If it applies to the motor then the oil has a limitless life and can live indefinitely under any conditions. How about that, is that so? If it applies to both it implies that the person who wrote the instruction knows every circumstance and operating condition that this bottle of oil might meet. Is that true? Does it really mean that? Wait, DEXOS approved only oils. Which generation. First or second. If they know so much then does that mean that the folks that used Gen I who should now use Gen 2 are just, "OPS!" we got it wrong, sorry? Does that mean if you own a make not GM your screwed? If so tell me what oil that is...that be some good stuff. How about the car manufacture knows every oil possible that can be used and what conditions their ever more inventive customers will not exceed. Pretty smart manufacture. I'll tell you how smart:

 

Smart enough to state something so vague as a certainty while giving themselves absolution. 

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Also remember an "Oil Life Monitor" is NOT an "Engine Life/condition Monitor."  Synthetic oil can lubricate for quite some time, but that doesn't mean wear particles aren't in suspension or that varnish isn't accumulating....

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OEM’s base the OCI's on an oil that meets minimum standards, not oils that are good, better or best.

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11 minutes ago, elcamino said:

OEM’s base the OCI's on an oil that meets minimum standards, not oils that are good, better or best.

 

OEM's base the OCI on drive line actuarial analysis.

 

Just past warranty is good to go. I use to know a guy at BMW whose job it was to make these calculations. Knew a guy at Zenith that had the same job. Both guys have passed but the game hasn't changed. They didn't get all customer sappy all the sudden. You guys.... Complain than they can't get AFM right or brake boosters or...or...or and yet swear by their word for oil. C'mon man! 

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Time for ol' Cowpie to chime in on here to remind us all that the additive pack in the oil is as important as the base oil, and that while the base oil may last a long, long time, the ingredients in the additive pack do not necessarily last that long.  

 

As for myself, in my never-ending search for the perfect oil (that is, oil that is easily obtainable to the common man at the usual places that automotive parts and fluids) to combat AFM problems, I've migrated to Shell Gas Truck motor oil.  It's a full synthetic, is Dexos-certified, is for any mileage, it stands up to severe heat/cold and towing/hauling, and it contains their diesel oil additive pack specially modified for gas engines.  Shell Gas Truck oil is rated higher than Shell's own Pennzoil Platinum and Quaker State Ultimate Durability, which are both rated higher than Mobil1).  I get my Shell Gas Truck oil at WalMart (5 quart jugs) or Autozone (jugs or quarts) and my Wix oil filters (same as NAPA Gold or Platinum) from O'Reilly Auto Parts, since my cache of AC Delco non-E-core oil filters ran out.  

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17 minutes ago, elcamino said:

OEM’s base the OCI's on an oil that meets minimum standards, not oils that are good, better or best.

 

Add to that, the OCI that will get the vehicle through the warranty period.  After that, it's not good business sense to care...

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9 hours ago, Grumpy Bear said:

Why change oil at all? Seriously. Because it's dirty? You can filter oil effectively for a very long time. In fact you can filter it cleaner than it was delivered new. Because the additives get depleted? You can buy boosters. Because it gets 'used'? You can add forever.

 

What destroys oils ability to lubricate that cannot be repaired nor reversed?

 

 

No answer? 

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