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Retired Bob

Add weight to rear of bed for wet road improvement

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Does anyone use weight in the back of the bed to give better wet road traction?  I use to have pieces of  railroad rail (about 20" lengths) in the back of my last truck - one piece on each side of the bed and close to the tailgate. I have tires that have good wet road ratings yet I can still slip the tires easily on medium takeoffs or hard stops. I would like to add something to the bed to give better traction to the light weight of the rear of the pickup.  Here is one option - but kind of expensive . I would think +/- 50 lbs each side - not too expensive?

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Weider-Olympic-Hammertone-Weight-Plate-45-lbs-Single/54165936?selected=true

 

I had 50# bags of sand (play sand) but the bags do not last very long  what with being exposed to the sun rays all the time and then I end up with all the sand in the bed.

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Nope

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If you want to have something safe in the back so that if you ever have to stop suddenly, the only thing I can think of is what my dad did when I was growing up. He would get tractor trailer inner tubes and cut them in half, fill them up with sand and then you hose clamps to seal them closed so no sand would spill out. This was a safe way to do it so if you hit the brakes they would not be a flying projectile hitting your cab or back window.  Plus in the winter time you could open them up if you got stuck and used the sand for traction.

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Negative for me also. Don’t use anything during winter either. I don’t even use 4wd much unless we have 8-12 inches of snow built up. I thought this was a thing of the past with traction control, stabilitrack and all the other goodies they use to keep us from flying off the roads these days 😂

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Posted (edited)

Not sure how the OP is breaking traction on wet roads when the TC won't allow it. 

I drive a lot, including a lot of wet conditions. never had even a hint of an issue with wet traction, with either the stock Bridgestones, or my winter Duratracs. Maybe tires are the issue for the OP?

Also, putting weight behind the rear wheels is a bad idea, as it becomes a pendulum when going around corners in slippery conditions.

 

Edited by Nanotech Environmental
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2 minutes ago, Nanotech Environmental said:

Not sure how the OP is breaking traction on wet roads when the TC won't allow it. 

Also, putting weight behind the rear wheels is a bad idea, as it becomes a pendulum when going around corners in slippery conditions.

 

 

TC will allow some wheel slip. Definitely enough to get dicey in the wet.

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I'd be looking into better tires is the rear end is to loose.  I know the Stock SRA's were horrible on my 2014.

 

Funny thing is have them on my 2018 and they are way better I suspect the made a compound change to them as they wear and have way better traction the the ones I had before.

 

 

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I used to spin out a lot with the sra’s on my 16. Junk. Absolutely junk. Put on cooper at3 LT’s. ****ing awesome. Bites good wears good and not bad off road either

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Weight is good for winter in snow. I don't believe it do much in just wet. Tire and section width would help more and honestly if that little helped that much work on your suspension then. Remove the rake and the transfer speed. It will transfer weight faster. If it is a real issue don't use drive gear set or even if this is a option for you have the tune changed so you increase the tc system and demand over actual torque. 

But there are race cars with wet tires and huge power low weight and do just fine. 

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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, RE1 said:

 

TC will allow some wheel slip. Definitely enough to get dicey in the wet.

Not on my '17. Not enough to cause any concern anyways.....

Edited by Nanotech Environmental

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2 hours ago, Retired Bob said:

Does anyone use weight in the back of the bed to give better wet road traction?  I use to have pieces of  railroad rail (about 20" lengths) in the back of my last truck - one piece on each side of the bed and close to the tailgate. I have tires that have good wet road ratings yet I can still slip the tires easily on medium takeoffs or hard stops. I would like to add something to the bed to give better traction to the light weight of the rear of the pickup.  Here is one option - but kind of expensive . I would think +/- 50 lbs each side - not too expensive?

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Weider-Olympic-Hammertone-Weight-Plate-45-lbs-Single/54165936?selected=true

 

I had 50# bags of sand (play sand) but the bags do not last very long  what with being exposed to the sun rays all the time and then I end up with all the sand in the bed.

My last 2wd after a long line of them was my 2000 Silverado.  I bought this truck at the time we purchased a new house in a very hilly neighbourhood.  I actually had to take a long way around on rainy days as my truck couldn't climb the nearest hill when the roads were wet. I decided to try new tires and reluctantly replaced my almost new oem tires with Michelin's from my local Costco.    From that point on my spinning wheel problem was solved.  I have since replaced my factory tires with Michelins shortly after purchase on subsequent trucks even though they have the 4 wd option.   I am not necessarily saying that Michelins are your solution but I am agreeing with others that your problem will be solved by better tires.   Sand is handy for spreading around on snow and ice covered roads and may be a good thing to carry around when snow is around.  It rains year-round where I live and it would be a pita to lug bags and weights around all of the time.

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Factory tires would slip when they forecasted 10% chance of rain. Put on Falken wild peak and you have to practically floor it to worry about losing any traction in rain. They were very good this past winter as well, snow and ice. 

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I don't add weight, but will admit, truck rides a helluva lot nicer with 15 bags of Mulch in it.

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2 hours ago, Beer Belly said:

I don't add weight, but will admit, truck rides a helluva lot nicer with 15 bags of Mulch in it.

Yes, adding a canopy and tool box had a similar impact. on my truck.  (Of course, I don't know how much of the improved ride was in my head justifying the expense!)  

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