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MacLaren

Protection Against SALT

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On 11/13/2019 at 7:22 PM, AlaskaErik said:

Best protection against salt is to move to Arizona.

Nah Bro, scorpions n shit.

 

 

Im getting Wool Wax done on monday.

 

Its like FF on steroids.

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On 11/13/2019 at 6:50 PM, MacLaren said:

With winter coming on, I'm trying to decide the best way to protect my truck from that nasty salt.

Right now, I'm leaning towards Amsoil HD Metal Protector. 

Anyone have any experience with this?

I've heard that fluid film might better used for an older truck that already has rust, because ff, after applied to a new GM, will cause the wax and everything to come off, leaving bare metal when sprayed with water. 

In order to really keep things rust free, you will have to use the right products and will need to do some work each year.

When my '17 was new, I had it undercoated with a special asphalt based product that is used by some new car dealers here in Ontario. This is safe to use over top of the factory applied Daubert product. It is much more effective and durable than the Daubert stuff.
I then got some undercoating oil, both amber and black, as well as some more of the asphalt based product. The oils are jelly like and have good creeping abilities. They get applied with a paint sprayer, or a schutz gun.
I applied the asphalt stuff on all the spots the dealer missed, as well as touched up some spots. I also did the rear axle, front suspension, and many other spots.
I applied the amber to the inner front fenders, inner rockers, cab corners, doors, etc.
The black stuff I applied in and around the tailgate, inner box sides, corners and in a number of areas under the truck, where I wanted good creeping qualities, such as inside the frame rails, trailer hitch, etc.

I get under the truck each spring and go over it, touching up any areas that need attention and re-spray the tailgate, box, rockers etc, fenders etc. If I see any spots on the frame, I get the wire wheel and remove the rust spots and surrounding coating til it's shiny metal. Then it gets resprayed with the asphalt stuff.

I will usually give things a checkover in the fall as well.

I wash the truck as frequently as possible in the winter, including as much as I can reach underneath.

I've used Fluid film and many other products in the past and IMO, they just don't stand up, or work that well. IMO, the Daubert stuff isn't tough enough for Ontario winters, unless one only drives occasionally.

Edited by Nanotech Environmental

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On 11/13/2019 at 11:26 PM, SilveradoRST said:

I use “Corrosion Free” made in Canada.  Great stuff.  It’s oil based and clear.  No dripping, fairly thick.  I like that it’s clear and not black so you can see underneath it and see if any rust has formed.  Doesn’t trap or hide rust like a undercoat might.  The Canadian military did a study and tested a few corrosion inhibitors and this product came out on top.  They have a website and I think they ship to the US.  

I use the same stuff. By far the best undercoating up here in Canada 

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Interesting... How long have you been using the Amsoil metal protector?

 

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I've been using Fluid Film for two years now (twice a year as well) on my frame and it hasn't harmed the frame wax one bit. Now I suppose if I aimed it right against one spot under high pressure, I could blast through the wax, but that would be true with any product.

 

The problem with the frame wax is that it dries out, then falls off in large chucks, or worse...it lifts a bit then the rust just grows and grows right under it. Then it falls off. The Fluid Film keeps it pretty pliable. The Chevy Dealers around me actually use  Fluid Film as their undercoating treatment ($250 an application, which is a ripoff).

 

But I think any product is better than nothing with these trucks - the frame wax is terrible if you don't treat it annually - cosmoline is another nice wax like treatment...little tougher than the FF/Krown/NH Undercoating/Woolight. CRC makes a marine wax coating that is a lot cheaper and more effective than the Amsoil/cosmoline/Daubart chemical.  

 

But the key is do something, you can't leave these frames alone...they'll be covered in rust after a year. 

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Best preventative is to never park a salted vehicle in a heated garage.

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I have been using Cortec VpCI-368D on my 1998 K1500 that I brought from TX to the rust belt in 2013.  Completely satisfied with its performance.

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2 hours ago, Thomcat said:

Best preventative is to never park a salted vehicle in a heated garage.

I think you may be right.  My garages have always been my place  I use to build, fix and store stuff.  I'll keep my Harley indoors but my truck is designed to live outdoors!   I haven't paid for additional undercoating since the '80's and my vehicles are rust free when I trade for new.  The inconvenience of climbing into a frozen car has been eliminated with remote start!

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This will sound extreme I know but I have what I call my 'salt car'.  A 2006 225K mile Honda Civic that is the daily driver and sacrificial lamb. Paint is peeling off. A few rust holes but mechanicals are solid as a rock and it's as reliable as the sun rise.  

 

My Buicks and bikes remain indoors but the truck sits outside year around. It never gets driven on the street when there is salt/salt water present. Doesn't get driven much in the winter living in northern Illinois. Still, I had it undercoated when I bought it, wash it regularly and keep it waxed. Fix every nick and bump as they happen and had the rear wheel wells Line-X coated including the seams. RTV in the body plugs. Still there is more I could do and yet she looks sharp yet going into her fifth winter. 

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3 hours ago, Thomcat said:

Best preventative is to never park a salted vehicle in a heated garage.

My thought as well. I just got rid of my 1996 Sierra that was never parked in a garage. Got hit with our Canadian winters since new 23 yrs of it and yes there was rust but passed safety when I sold it.  

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Here in Michigan where they use a ton of salt I have found works best is. The $20.00 a month Tommy's unlimited car wash package. It's one of the best washes anywhere and it's quick. I have been twice in1 day many times. It takes about 3 minutes from start to finish and goes a great job

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5 hours ago, mcgee500 said:

Here in Michigan where they use a ton of salt I have found works best is. The $20.00 a month Tommy's unlimited car wash package. It's one of the best washes anywhere and it's quick. I have been twice in1 day many times. It takes about 3 minutes from start to finish and goes a great job

We have a Tommy's system around here.  I just have one thought.

 

Car wash places recycle their water around here.  In the winter when you have car after car going through, I would think the water turns pretty saline.

 

Yes, they filter the water, but filters do not remove salt.

 

Do these washes end up just blasting saline water deeper into crevices?

 

Edited by jefferoonie

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45 minutes ago, jefferoonie said:

We have a Tommy's system around here.  I just have one thought.

 

Car wash places recycle their water around here.  In the winter when you have car after car going through, I would think the water turns pretty saline.

 

Yes, they filter the water, but filters do not remove salt.

 

Do these washes end up just blasting saline water deeper into crevices?

 

Do they, my truck comes out very clean I think it would have a haze on it if it had salt in it. Maybe the wash water they might reuse but not the rinse water. That's just my guess. Here this is the best way I have found to keep it clean and free of road salt all winter.

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