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Bought my dream truck, turned into a nightmare!


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Sorry to hear about the truck.

 

The owners manual says not to tow before 500 miles and it's recommended to change the oil before towing heavy loads.  Don't know the size of boat you was pulling, plus the weight the load of wood in the bed, but do you think this could of contribute to the engine problem? 

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2 hours ago, rv245 said:

Sorry to hear about the truck.

 

The owners manual says not to tow before 500 miles and it's recommended to change the oil before towing heavy loads.  Don't know the size of boat you was pulling, plus the weight the load of wood in the bed, but do you think this could of contribute to the engine problem? 

Totally agree with this. Wanting to complain for faulty issues is fair and I’m with you.. until you flat out don’t follow the vehicle manufacturer recommendations/guidelines for break in and your engine takes a ******. 

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On 7/27/2020 at 3:19 PM, 1997SierraSLT said:

General Motors doesn't need to manufacture a quality product as long as the consumer continues to purchase.  They are betting on brand loyalty to keep them afloat.  Or at least up until their next multi-billion dollar bailout.

No they are not.  They know you as a consumer are replaceable if you become dissatisfied.  At least for now.  There are other manufacturers though, primarily Honda and Crapota, who realized that they needed to improve their product and reliability if they wanted to have any chance at staying afloat in America, and they did exactly that in the 80s.  Hyundai/Kia realized they had shitty products in the 90s and began bringing on experienced engineers to help improve their product and reliability.  By 2014/2015 they were one of the most successful brands in America, though still not quite as superior as Honda and Crapota. 

Edited by Colossus
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The break-in recommendation is to ensure a long healthy engine life, emphasis on long because if you don't follow it, it doesn't mean you should expect your engine to take a dump within the first month of ownership. Makes no sense to point a finger at that just to make yourselves feel better about whats in your driveway. It's a sad occurrence that shouldn't have happened but did due to bad luck or poor quality control. 

 

Plenty of well broken in engines have failed prematurely and plenty of those that were abused lived a long healthy life. This goes for all brands, some more than others.

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Tons of issues with my 2019 GM ended up repurchasing it. My 2020 3.0L is much better. The 8 speed automatic is a toilet google how many class action law suites GM has pending against them.

Edited by ILSilverado
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3 hours ago, ILSilverado said:

Tons of issues with my 2019 GM ended up repurchasing it. My 2020 3.0L is much better. The 8 speed automatic is a toilet google how many class action law suites GM has pending against them.

Ya dont try and explain that to these people.  this is just a disapoint generation Ive waited for it for a long time really thought it was gonna be much better

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On 7/31/2020 at 7:04 AM, batman900 said:

The break-in recommendation is to ensure a long healthy engine life, emphasis on long because if you don't follow it, it doesn't mean you should expect your engine to take a dump within the first month of ownership. Makes no sense to point a finger at that just to make yourselves feel better about whats in your driveway. It's a sad occurrence that shouldn't have happened but did due to bad luck or poor quality control. 

 

Plenty of well broken in engines have failed prematurely and plenty of those that were abused lived a long healthy life. This goes for all brands, some more than others.

 

This has nothing to do about what's in our driveway.   I asked the OP a simple question which he hasn't got back to answering yet.  He just got the truck and 8 days later loaded up the truck with wood and hooked up a boat, then took off in 100+ degree temps.  The only thing I asked was what was the weight of the boat and payload of the wood (not counting driver, passengers and other gear) and if it could of contribute to the engine problem being such a new truck.  If he would of replied or stated in the OP that the boat/trailer weighed 3k and the payload in the back was 500lbs, it would make sense that it probably was bad luck or poor quality control.  You mean to say that you can tow/haul what every amount of weight you want and don't have to worry about it.

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For almost 40 years every 3/4-1 ton truck I bought gas or diesel. Went from the dealer to my gooseneck installer then to my exhaust guy. Then got hooked up to my 7000 lb trailer. Then I loaded up my demo tractor and hit the road. Usually all before it’s first hundred miles. I usually did that every 2-3 years. I lost one engine. It was bad injector seals on a V-10. It led to a lean blown pistons at 40K miles. The results was a warranty replacement. Times that by 4 other of my partners doing the same thing. I test drove them like I stole them. And broke them in the same. I’ve owned mostly performance vehicles did the same. Break in usually was how long it would lay down rubber. Growing up I remember my father usually had the car to beat. Anytime brothers or other family members got a new car. They come out to the country and line up with him. My father was usually driving his latest 455 Buick. That how we broke them in. I don’t think that was his problem.


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12 hours ago, rv245 said:

 

This has nothing to do about what's in our driveway.   I asked the OP a simple question which he hasn't got back to answering yet.  He just got the truck and 8 days later loaded up the truck with wood and hooked up a boat, then took off in 100+ degree temps.  The only thing I asked was what was the weight of the boat and payload of the wood (not counting driver, passengers and other gear) and if it could of contribute to the engine problem being such a new truck.  If he would of replied or stated in the OP that the boat/trailer weighed 3k and the payload in the back was 500lbs, it would make sense that it probably was bad luck or poor quality control.  You mean to say that you can tow/haul what every amount of weight you want and don't have to worry about it.

I didn't quote you in my reply. 

 

And to answer your question, yes you should be able to tow up to the limit right off the lot without your engine crapping out immediately. What do you think these construction companies do with them? They don't baby them for 500 miles then get an oil change before using it for their intended purpose. Those trucks are abused from day one by someone that doesn't own it barely making more than minimum wage.

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30k on my 19 6.2L. Has not been to the dealer once since picking it up over a year ago. They keep pestering me to get the recalls done. It's been a great vehicle so far. 

Edited by Minnvmax
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