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Experiences driving a 3500 SRW over 2500 and a 8ft bed vs 6'10"


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Two main questions

 

Would you consider a 3500 over the 2500?

Would you consider daily driving the 8ft bed over the following configuration? :

 

2021 GMC 2500 CrewCab Duramax Regular Bed 4x4.

 

It is roughly $1000 more to get the 3500.   $200 for only the long Bed.

 

I can see I will lose some ride quality with the 3500.  The 8ft bed will be a bit more tricky to maneuver in Omaha.  

 

I know I will use the 8ft bed on a regular basis. 

 

Thoughts and Experiences?

 

 

 

 

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The 3500 may also cost more for registration and insurance, depending on what your local taxes/regulations are.

If you tow heavy stuff, consider the DRW, as it handles that better.

 

Don't know why you'd consider the short bed if you regularly haul longer stuff.

 

I dd an extended cab, cab&chassis truck, with a 10' flatbed, which is both longer and wider than a similar srw 8' bed truck, and with the backup camera, it's not a big deal to park and drive around.  You do need a bigger spot, and stick out somewhat, but a backup camera and mirrors, I can get into a spot if it's wide enough, and right up to whatever's behind the truck.

 

 

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What’s the difference between the 2500 and 3500 SRW of all other configuration is the same? Is it a heavier duty leaf in the rear that provides the increased payload and stiffness?


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Long beds are much easier to get around and deal with than you think. I actually went to a DRW long bed this time (daily driver) and was quite worried when I ordered it. I've had it since February with no regrets. Much easier than I thought after about 2-weeks of getting used to it.  And you can't beat the extra space in the bed with the 8'. 

Edited by Tomato
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  • 2 weeks later...

I haven't actually measured turning radius, but it's pretty good on these. I have a 2500 with heavy front springs. Ride is fine, don't believe a 3500 ride would be different. You don't get into the extra leaves until loaded. The 3500 does have a larger rear diff. 

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If you can afford it go for the 3500 SRW.  Always nice to have extra capacity for little if any empty ride impact.  Personally I'll never go back to a short bed and going from a crew cab 2500 short bed to a crew cab dually wasn't as huge of a deal as everyone seems to make it out to be.  Maybe the fact that I avoid cities by default helps but yeah.  With a dually I'm guaranteed an 8ft bed.  So would I choose a 3500 SRW 8ft over a 2500 short bed?  Yes, every single time if given the choice.  You already said you'd use the 8ft bed on a regular basis so you answered your own question :)

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Comparing the Silverado 3500 CC 6'10" bed to my 04.5 Dodge Ram 3500 QuadCab 6'6" bed, the turning radius is way longer on the Chevy. I think it has more to do with the bigger cab in the Chevy (and resulting longer wheelbase). In fact, it feels very comparable to my brother's 06 Dodge Ram 3500 QuadCab with an 8' bed.

 

But, comparing GM CC short to GM CC long bed, I wouldn't expect as dramatic of a difference.

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Payload is the biggest thing I think 3500 > 2500.  If you run a big 5th wheel camper or a heavy travel trailer, 3500 will give you a better payload safety net vs. the 2500.  And yes, the 2500 can do much more payload than the old trucks, but the 1 ton is still more.

 

The door sticker is the definitive identifier based on how the truck is equipped, but on average its a 500-700lbs increase in payload on the 1 ton over a 2500.  

 

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1 hour ago, davester said:

Note, depending on location, it can cost more than just the difference in purchase price, as insurance, licensing/registration fee's can also be higher for the 3500 vs the 2500.

Really think enough to buy a truck that does not work for the OP going with the short bed 2500?

 

Either truck is going to be $70000.00 plus, I think he could probably handle a few more dollars to get what he needs if he can afford either truck.

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