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Thanks, Sent texas speed a email, ordering their headers as well. Might do a port n polish on the heads. Have to talk to the shop and see what they recommend. They have been working on ls motors since the beginning. They just might say bite the bullet and do super charger who knows.

 

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Buy a whipple...use it for a bit and then sell it to me for a fair price

 

Edit...ever talk to that biggerdogg guy, wonder how his setup is doing

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Ever watch those YouTube video's on stage building normally asperated engines? Same motor over several 'stages' of build? Eventually they all hit a ceiling whose height is chained to the fuels resistance to knock. When they hit that ceiling they may get one or two more increases in horsepower but the peak torque number stays pretty close to the knock limit. More power it obtained by moving the same peak torque further up the rpm scale. 

 

If your old enough you've seen this played out by OEM engineers. About 50 years ago 87 octane fuel had a mechanical compression ratio limit between 8.0:1 and 8.5:1. Now it's closer to 11:1 to 12:1. Go back 50 years further and the limits were nearer 5.0:1. Back then getting big increases in torque, that thing that makes towing easier, was not that difficult. Many of the OMG moments in these videos are provided with motors of that era that are being treated to todays technology. 

 

Where ever you stop along that time line you could bring the oldest to the performance of the newest but never beyond. And as this was happening, and if you were paying close attention, you would have noticed that as power levels went up the rpm was coming down which meant that other factors besides mechanical compression ratio that influence  knock were constantly being fretted out. Chamber shapes, fuel introduction methods, camshaft profile and manipulation, to name a few. 

 

To get 465 horsepower out of a 6 liter motor in the mid 60's on 93 pump fuel would have required a dedicated race motor builder spinning it a couple of thousand rpm higher than the OEM does now. 

 

Still getting a 50 pounds/feet increase in torque at the same rpm? 

 

Here's a link to a cam swap that does ALMOST as you ask: (peak torque rpm placement is quite a bit higher) 

 

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/l92-6-2l-camshaft-dyno-test/

 

After reading this link and reviewing the dyno charts ask yourself if this motor is the motor you want to use towing

 

The factory 6.2 is already a beast by any yardstick you care to measure it with....apples to apples 😉 

Edited by Grumpy Bear

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Back in the day we did light modifications to our big block gas motors for towing. Gearing was the most gains were for pulling. One of our first tow vehicles was a two ton wrecker we put a tow ball in. It was a 6 cylinder with a 4 speed, two speed rear. It would pull our 7K gooseneck trailer and 14K tractor with ease up to 65 mph. Later with light engine mods we added gear vendors to accomplish the same result. After pulling my brother in laws large camper with his Ford diesel. I can’t imagine the need for additional mods.


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Buy a whipple...use it for a bit and then sell it to me for a fair price
 
Edit...ever talk to that biggerdogg guy, wonder how his setup is doing
Have not heard back from him..curious too

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