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todd308

Recovery strap attachment with closed tow hooks?

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Over the years I've been pulled out a lot and pulled out a lot of guys winters and off roading but I have to admit I've always had either a hitch mounted D ring setup, or tow/recovery hooks that were open, or drilled D shackle mounts up front.   

 

What's the best way to attach a recovery strap, should I ever need to, to these newer GM's with the closed tow hooks with a square shape in the front bumper like the AT4?   Seems like using a D ring it could easily move around because their tow hook is tall/flat in the front and end up being aligned improperly especially with a recovery strap where you are gently taking a run at it.  Only thing else I could think of was just running one end through the closed hook, and thread the opposite end through the loop of the first end and snugging it up (see pic below).    I did check the manual and sadly all it shows is a picture of a giant log chain run through it with the hook attached a few links away, and a statement to never pull on the recovery hooks from the side, or tow the vehicle with them.

 

Something like this: appraratus-recovery-strap-training-14-63

 

 

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That’s how I’d do it. Run it through the “hook” and then the end of the strap. 
 

 

NEVER use D rings, hooks, or chains (either solely or at the end of a strap) to pull a stuck vehicle as the metal object at the end of the strap or cable can become a deadly projectile if something breaks. 

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Soft shackles are the way to go.

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Posted (edited)

(for context...I am in rigging and material handling as a profession)

 

The way that picture shows the webbing sling being choked is incorrect. You should let that fire department know that. This is one of the biggest issues with people and towing/material handling. They are not trained and do not go through the effort of researching how to properly tow/recover/material handle, so they do inevitably do things incorrectly. Then blame the product for the failure. 90% of the time, things are fine....because products are usually extremely over-engineered....but the issue is that is gives a false sense of confidence and creates very bad practices. So the day it does matter, you end up with a catastrophic failure that could result in injury or death.

 

Flat, webbing slings can be choked, but the radius of the object they're choked around must be appropriate for the eye opening. It should not come back onto the eye like that. Also keep in mind that when you choke a sling, you reduce its WLL. And you should never choke around the seams of a sling. It's also kind of a pain to have to pull an entire 20FT strap through itself like that. 

 

I don't personally like soft shackles, but you can use them if you like.

People really don't like hard shackles around here, but it's really fine....the end of a 15lbs tow strap coming towards your head can be just as deadly as a 1lb shackle. It's one of those things that got a bad wrap without any real testing or science behind it. Like the man/off road guy version of an "old wives tale". Shackles and chains are used in literally every industry for material handing far greater loads than pulling a vehicle out. It just becomes an issue when people are buying cheap-o shackles and such on Amazon without knowing enough about WLL and breaking strength rating and dynamic loads. I'm amazed at some of the recovery gear sold on Amazon that has shockingly low load ratings. Just make sure everything is properly rated and do your research and you're good to go. Get stuff from reputable companies. ARB, WARN, etc.

 

Personally, I just don't use shackles on my tow hooks because I don't want the black or red metal to get scuffed and scrape off. I just happen to have 2 short endless roundslings from my job that I use. So I basket those around my hook, then shackle it to the tow strap. Because I work in rigging and material handling, so I really just don't like the concept of soft shackles...I like something a bit more secure. But that's just me. 

Edited by shanemoon

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