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Hi All,

I would like to install the Chevy approved 2” lift on my 19 RST but I’ve had a couple of dealers tell me it’s not available. Anyone have any luck finding one? If so, was it worth it? Thanks! 

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Posted (edited)

there are bunch of options to do this mod......GM factory lift, bilstein, king, fox, eibach, etc......its pretty simple modification, you can buy the factory lift on ebay and just take it to a dealer and have them install it

 

2019-2020 Silverado Sierra Next Gen 4WD 1500 2" Suspension Lift Kit 84993582 OEM | eBay

 

idk why it says 8k but they are about $900-1000

Edited by Dunn
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I’ve been on the fence about the same lift while they are still offering 20% off but I’m not sure if it’s worth it or not.  I’m also still a little confused about the max tires size I’d be able to run on the stock 20’s with the 2” lift.

9DDEEBB0-E385-43EE-A835-7E09CEF095D8.png

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Just a reminder on this lift, if you have the composite rear leaf springs you're suppose to replace them with the steel leaf springs listed on GM's accessory website as part of the lift, or so GM says.

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Interesting, I’m guessing a way you can tell is to stick a magnet to the leaf and see if it sticks?  If not it’s composite?  I didn’t realize you needed the steel leafs and honestly I have no idea what’s on my truck.

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Maybe in a Subaru, but I don't believe that's the case in our trucks.  On mine it appears that the bottom leaf is a composite leaf, while the one layered on top appear to be steel.  The only way to be sure is using a magnet, which I have not yet done myself.

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There are tons of options out there, and almost everyone is better than the GM option and cheaper.  The GM 2" lift, like all the other 2" lifts for the most part, is simply a shock and block lift, nothing more suspension wise.  The plus from the GM lift is the longer CV's, but those aren't necessary and there are no 2" aftermarket lifts that include or require them other than the GM kit.  

 

Regarding the lift with the composite shocks, it really isn't an issue.  Most people have the composite leafs, don't realize it, and install the shock/block lift never knowing otherwise.  I have the composite leafs, did a 2" Eibach lift (Like a billion other people), and keep on trucking with ZERO ill effects.  

 

Best thing you could do is figure out which shock brand has the characteristics you prefer, purchase from that company, and never look back.  You will be amazed at the difference in the ride once you go with a reputable aftermarket shock company (Bilstein, Eibach, King, Fox, etc).

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23 hours ago, Gangly said:

There are tons of options out there, and almost everyone is better than the GM option and cheaper.  The GM 2" lift, like all the other 2" lifts for the most part, is simply a shock and block lift, nothing more suspension wise.  The plus from the GM lift is the longer CV's, but those aren't necessary and there are no 2" aftermarket lifts that include or require them other than the GM kit.  

 

Regarding the lift with the composite shocks, it really isn't an issue.  Most people have the composite leafs, don't realize it, and install the shock/block lift never knowing otherwise.  I have the composite leafs, did a 2" Eibach lift (Like a billion other people), and keep on trucking with ZERO ill effects.  

 

Best thing you could do is figure out which shock brand has the characteristics you prefer, purchase from that company, and never look back.  You will be amazed at the difference in the ride once you go with a reputable aftermarket shock company (Bilstein, Eibach, King, Fox, etc).

 

To say the longer CV's aren't necessary is just incorrect, ditto with the rear lift block and composite springs. The amount of testing, engineering and designing going in to this by people who are educated specifically in this disciple means they don't include items that aren't necessary just for sh*ts and giggles. They probably found the block supplied caused issues or cracking or something with the composite leafs and not with the steel as the mounting surface materials are different? And the extended travel with the front suspension probably put more wear on the stock CV's and they wouldn't last if used off road and in 4wd often so they added longer ones to make sure they work for 100k miles. If the truck is a pavement princess it probably won't show up as usually if they note something it is found in harsher durability testing; this is especially true if you trade it in every few years for the latest and greatest and don't put many miles on the truck. So no, saying the new CV's aren't necessary and the block is fine might be ok now, but these trucks are very new with minimal miles and years on them and the effects they find in testing aren't going to show up this early...

 

The reason he probably wants to stay with the factory lift (though the aftermarket has some better options in terms or handling and ride) is he wants to guarantee his warranty stays intact. I work for a company that provides warranties and we check for items that alter that performance of the warrantied parts prior to approving and specifically we check for lifts, over sized wheels/tires, tunes and if the vehicle is used for a driving service such as Uber. So a factory supplied lift keeps that intact from GM to be covered where if a ball joint fails with a ready lift kit or Bilstein lift GM won't cover it but the factory lift kit they will. 

 

Tyler

Edited by Amcguy1970
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31 minutes ago, Amcguy1970 said:

 

To say the longer CV's aren't necessary is just incorrect, ditto with the rear lift block and composite springs. The amount of testing, engineering and designing going in to this by people who are educated specifically in this disciple means they don't include items that aren't necessary just for sh*ts and giggles. They probably found the block supplied caused issues or cracking or something with the composite leafs and not with the steel as the mounting surface materials are different? And the extended travel with the front suspension probably put more wear on the stock CV's and they wouldn't last if used off road and in 4wd often so they added longer ones to make sure they work for 100k miles. If the truck is a pavement princess it probably won't show up as usually if they note something it is found in harsher durability testing; this is especially true if you trade it in every few years for the latest and greatest and don't put many miles on the truck. So no, saying the new CV's aren't necessary and the block is fine might be ok now, but these trucks are very new with minimal miles and years on them and the effects they find in testing aren't going to show up this early...

 

The reason he probably wants to stay with the factory lift (though the aftermarket has some better options in terms or handling and ride) is he wants to guarantee his warranty stays intact. I work for a company that provides warranties and we check for items that alter that performance of the warrantied parts prior to approving and specifically we check for lifts, over sized wheels/tires, tunes and if the vehicle is used for a driving service such as Uber. So a factory supplied lift keeps that intact from GM to be covered where if a ball joint fails with a ready lift kit or Bilstein lift GM won't cover it but the factory lift kit they will. 

 

Tyler

I think you might be misunderstanding my post, or rather the context I am presenting my opinion in.  The extended CV's aren't necessary for a 2" lift, plain and simple, and its been proven over and over again.  If you are so inclined, find one instance of a pulled out CV on a 2" lifted T1 truck, I'll be waiting a while for you.  Whether you want to believe it or not is up to you.  Is there a benefit to them?  YES, but only on extended travel situations BEYOND what a 2" lift will entail.  GM put a little extra "cushion" in there by extending in the inserted length, nothing more, and it's not a necessity for a 2" lift.  The extended CV is no more stable, stronger, or applying/receiving any increased measure of energy transfer through up and down suspension travel, its purely an elongated piece to keep it from popping out which a stock, non-extended CV WILL NOT DO on a 2" lift. 

 

If you want to get into the engineering aspect of it, two rods of equal cross sectional thickness, density, and material type, one being longer than the other, the shorter rod is less susceptible to a bending moment than the longer rod, giving the benefit to the shorter length rod.  However, minus that and seeing how the shear strength, torsional strength, and compression/tension values would be nearly identical between the two different length rods, there is no benefit to the extended CV other than purely for limiting "pull out" situations.  Again, that wont happen with a 2" lift so its need is negated.

 

That being said, I would HIGHLY suggest the longer CV's if you are going with a 3"+ lift or greater, unless doing a diff drop which would again negate the need for longer CV's,

 

As for the rear block, there is a small spacer (from the factory) that fits between the block and the spring so there is no difference in contact surfaces between the block and the spring when adding a larger block. 

 

Since you work for a company that "provides warranties", you also know that that any failed component that is denied through a warranty claim has to be directly linked to an alteration of a vehicle, and proven to be a direct failure as a result of the component, for a warranty denial to stand.  So tell me, what warrantied component is your company going to deny warranty work for on a 2" aftermarket suspension lift (shock and block) that utilizes the same lift architecture and geometry as the factory 2" lift (shock and block) but with better engineered components?  

 

-A hub?  No, part numbers are the same as the TB and the drive train angles (CV angles) are the same as they would be on a stock TB so you can't argue that.

-UCA or LCA?  No, the part numbers are the same as on the TB and working at the same geometry as the TB so you can't argue that.

-Front Differential?  No, part numbers are the same as the TB and the geometry is the same as on a stock TB so you can't argue that.

 

All an aftermarket 2" lift is doing is putting the truck's suspension and driveline angles identical to the TB, which the factory designed the components to work properly at.  Stock Z71 CV's will not pull out of the front differential at TB drivetrain angles, and I doubt they would pull out at 3"+ of lift, but I would personally install the extended CV's if I was going over 2" of lift and I would encourage others to at 3"+ of lift.  However, for a mild 2" lift...nah, ill pass.

 

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You guys seem to know a lot more about this than me.  Do you guys know if a 295/55r20 tire would fit without rubbing on a 2020 GMC Sierra elevation using the stock 20” rims without changing anything other than installing the 2” gm lift?

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13 hours ago, Matt Grz said:

You guys seem to know a lot more about this than me.  Do you guys know if a 295/55r20 tire would fit without rubbing on a 2020 GMC Sierra elevation using the stock 20” rims without changing anything other than installing the 2” gm lift?

The Silverado was designed to be able to fit a 35" tire on factory wheels.  The 35" tire is a CLOSE fit but it does fit.  The Sierra has slightly smaller dimensions and will rub with most, if not all 35's on factory wheels.

 

However, with your 295/55/20, your slightly below 33".  That tire is effectively smaller in diameter than your stock tire size, but with an approximate 11.6 inch width.  That tire should fit fine.

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  • 3 months later...

Hello, I drive a 2021 Sierra SLT w/max tow package and 6.2L. I'm with Matt on being outnumbered by the number of experts on here albeit you can here the experience talking. I too am looking at installing the OEM 2" lift kit but here is where my decision leans heavily on the engineers at GM rather than the tons of people who are professional enthusiast. The OEM kit and and having the 6.2L engine, there is definitely more rise "Hop" to the front end based on the engine weight. Slightly longer CV axels take care of this and offer some peace of mind in modifying and 80k vehicle. Secondly, my truck has the Denali ultimate package that includes the technology package. This means; the height of the vehicle once altered, changes the field of view (FOV) on the front cameras and cross traffic sensors and included the electronic power steering recalibration (EPS). They all get recalibrated with the OEM kit installed at the dealer and are included with the 600 dollar installation (I'm not sure what the Chevys have for these features). The EPS is probably the biggest one of all since we're talking about and encoder that senses linear torque and yaw from those CV's and sends that signal to the servo that controls the EPS. You just can't make those mods on your garage floor without having access to the ECM data. As for shocks, I called Bilstein because I read and heard great things about there products and what is included with their 2" suspension lift does not cover the 6.2L engine weight out of the box so the shocks have to be upgraded to something similar to that on a 2500 and ruins the ride of a SLT. Just my 2 cents, but dollar for dollar without devaluing the truck, my money is going on the OEM kit until there is a large enough install base with street mods. This is available at GM parts direct for 1195.00.

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On 9/28/2021 at 4:55 AM, Roy Juneau said:

The OEM kit and and having the 6.2L engine, there is definitely more rise "Hop" to the front end based on the engine weight. Slightly longer CV axels take care of this and offer some peace of mind in modifying and 80k vehicle. 

 

The EPS is probably the biggest one of all since we're talking about and encoder that senses linear torque and yaw from those CV's and sends that signal to the servo that controls the EPS. You just can't make those mods on your garage floor without having access to the ECM data. 

 

As for shocks, I called Bilstein because I read and heard great things about there products and what is included with their 2" suspension lift does not cover the 6.2L engine weight out of the box so the shocks have to be upgraded to something similar to that on a 2500 and ruins the ride of a SLT.

Nobody should have to defend their expenditures when it comes to their own finances, so I am in no way blasting you for chosing to go with the OEM setup.  Its your money, you earned it, and you have the right to enjoy your expenditures in what ever manner you prefer.   If you chose to paint your truck pink and roll on 30" wheels with 35" swampers, thats ok, you do you. 

 

However, there are several misconceptions here, including fallible logic which is easily disproven, that needs to be addressed and corrected so that others reading this don't get mislead.  I've taken the curtesy of placing numbers next to three of your "statements" to keep the three topics independently identified in the following discussion.

 

Regarding statement Number 1:

The stock CV's and longer TB/AT4 CV's allow for more travel length than factory allowable limits of any configuration currently provided by GM.  Neither CV is over extended, or can even be extended beyond allowable engineered parameters of factory offered suspension components(TB and AT4 shocks included) and therefore neither will pull out unless you have significant suspension modifications to the vehicle such as long arm suspension travel setups.  The reason for the longer CV's on the TB/AT4 setups is because the factory has to assume that people will lift their already lifted trucks(TB/AT4) and therefore must provide CV's that can accommodate EVEN LARGER lifts that the factory 2" lift from the factory.  Neither the stock length CV's, or the extended CV's, will come close to pulling out at 2"-3" of lift above factory stock, period.  Most importantly though is a correction to your largely incorrect assumption regarding "hop"  and how longer CV's "take care of this and offer peace of mind".  A longer CV has ZERO affect in whether or not your vehicle is hopping and therefore cannot "take care of this" as your statement falsely reads.  Encouraging a modification to "feel safer" when it has no affect on hopping or safety is the equivalent of an old western tonic salesmen claiming you can sleep better at night because their tonic cures all ailments.  Simply not true on any level and 100% false.

 

Regarding Statement Number 2:

The yaw vectoring is not controlled by CV Length and is not affected in any way, shape, or form by the CV length.  The CV length has ZERO affect on any algorithms utilized in determining yaw rate while the primary variables in determining yaw rate are the multiple accelerometers, wheel speed sensors, throttle position sensor, and brake sensor.  The purpose of the algorithm utilized in yaw rate calculations is to determine the rotational angle, in terms of radians or degrees, of the centerline of the vehicle with respect to the z-axis (vertical pole running through the middle of a vehicles center mass, in relation to the directional travel of the vehicle's center mass.  Not a single input into the yaw rate algorithm takes into consideration the length of a CV shaft, as it has ZERO affect on yaw rate calculations or safety systems.  If it makes you feel better to believe it does, then that's fine, believe whatever makes you feel warm and fuzzy at night, but don't produce false information for others to hear and repeat.

 

Regarding Statement Number 3:

No international big-box shock manufacturer produces different shocks for varying engine weights unless its something as significant as gas vs diesel.  They are designed for total weight capacity, that's why in identical trucks with identical suspension setups from the factory the 5.3 has a higher payload capacity than the 6.2. Again, the suspension isn't designed for specific engines, its designed for total anticipated weight and therefore the since the 5.3 is ligher it gets a higher payload capacity since the suspension is designed around total capacity.  No big box shock manufacturer will tell you that a shock was designed for a specific weight engine, especially when the weight difference at each corner would probably be less than 50 lbs per corner, which is miniscule, and has no bearing on maximum capacty engineered safety parameters.

 

If you feel safer by purchasing the OEM suspension, then that's awesome and I urge you to do so, but please don't try to justify your decision making process by utilizing topics you know just enough about to sound knowledgeable on, but not enough about to know your speaking incorrectly while offering bad/false information to others.

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