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2019 Silverado Crew Cab Ham Radio Antenna installation Help


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Hi, I like to install two antennas in my 2019 Silverado Crew Cab I'm looking at no-drill mounts was looking at the  
Valley Enterprises Fender Mount Antenna Bracket 3/4 Inch NMO for Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2019-2021  but wanted to ask if anyone found a coax cable route that does not require any drilling thru the firewall? any help would be Appreciated

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Welcome - I have a trunk lid mount on the corner of hood , ran cable down alone the fram to the rear of the truck . If you claw under your truck , you see a rubber plug right in front of the rear seat , push cable thru plug , lift carpet and run cable under rear seat.  That were i mount my radio , with remount head on dash by "A" pillar .

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