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Gale Banks visits AMSOIL


Black02Silverado
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Here are two interesting videos. They are long but it is cool to see how oil is packaged and the information on the differences in oil groups as well as how diesel oil helps keep engines clean.

 

 

 

 

This is also a long video but helps to explain the questions of what is a synthetic oil.

 

 

Edited by Black02Silverado
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  • 3 weeks later...
42 minutes ago, Black02Silverado said:

Done.   What do you think of them? 

 

As you asked: 

 

#1 was like going to work in some of the units I worked in. Nothing really new for me but for those with no exposure to the industry a gold mine. 

 

#2 was full of useful and insightful information and a few things not. 

 

#3 I hope people note how many times they say that viscosity is the number one defense against wear. That the wear additives are there when something happens to prevent oil from reaching the parts viscosity is to separate, or when do to failures, abuse, neglect the viscosity is compromised. Fuel dilution or low oil level or badly overheated for examples that came to mind. Oh I loved that they introduce the public to 'Shear induced viscosity loss" in the graphing. They could have spent some time on shear than does not recover vs that which does. 

 

#4 I hope people note what extraordinary conditions it takes to create situations in a daily driver that produce the possible number of times those things happen from the third video. Not a bit of that film was indicative of anything remotely resembling a 'street motor' but boy was it on the nose for race motors in live cars. Well thought out test sequencing. No application to anything in the street world. Okay if you're in the habit of towing 4K rpm plus while two/three quarts low on oil maybe. 

 

All in all? Well played. 😉  I enjoyed this brace of video. More than I do the monthly magazine. Gale added allot to this series. 

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I like them because it brings to light information as to what AMSOIL actually is as a company.  They provide much more than just passenger car lubricants.  They have a completely different area that services windmills. 

 

Also they are into racing in a way that most don't see because they don't put the money out for the marketing but provide lubricants for race teams.

 

Their R&D in lubricants for commercial use is another area that most don't realize.  Commercial landscape business and the abuse their equipment takes, most don't realize how often they change out equipment because it is worn out.  But through use of a quality product equipment life can be extended and helps save money for the business.

 

Reading the comments on Gale Banks Youtube channel surprised me.  Hardly any negative and mostly positive.

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2 hours ago, customboss said:

Who knew pigs were used to blend engine oil!  If only the US fuel pipeline used more efficient pigs so the cross contamination of diesel was less. 

 

Remember what Gale said about the welds required for those pigs to work correctly? True story. Last refinery I worked in Texas was in part an old refinery from Ohio. Riveted cold formed pipe by the mile manufactured in 1926. Get a pig to work in that pipe 😜

 

Crude and fuel pipelines can range from 4" to 48". That's not a pig...that's a sow.  

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That facility is top notch, closest to Amsoil on smaller scale I have toured is Idemitsu in Jeffersonville, Indiana.  Most oil blenders that are popular brands are GROSS, old, and dirty as you described above.  BP Castrol in US a prime example because they will refine their product anywhere its cheap....LOL  

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8 hours ago, Black02Silverado said:

Done.   What do you think of them? 

Thanks for sharing Nick, Amsoil has stepped up their game with engine test cell work, lab confirmation, bench testing, and formulating/blending clean. Very few companies do that now. Most buy an add pack and viscosity read across and blend away test and send out barely passable stuff. 

 

Valvoline was a great automotive engine test cell company at one time and I hope they come back that way but they depended on collaborative HD testing with a partner more than in-house. 

 

Amatuzio's original formulations were really cutting edge collaboratively worked with Hatco POE now Chemtura out of NJ back in early 1970's. 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for posting this.

Are all group III base stocks the same quality? If I understand it means it has less garbage in it than a group I. Is Amsoils group III more refined/cleaner base stock?

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29 minutes ago, diyer2 said:

Thanks for posting this.

Are all group III base stocks the same quality? If I understand it means it has less garbage in it than a group I. Is Amsoils group III more refined/cleaner base stock?

Amsoil doesn’t make its own base stocks. They source them from any number of suppliers on those rail cars. 
From my experience most of their products are majority GRP IV but a blend for specific performance. 

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54 minutes ago, customboss said:

Amsoil doesn’t make its own base stocks. They source them from any number of suppliers on those rail cars. 
From my experience most of their products are majority GRP IV but a blend for specific performance. 

My family will forever be grateful for finding Amsoil early on with our business. Extended drains with our equipment and trucks saved us money. Our biggest savings was with hydraulics. With high flow and high pressure drive pumps that ran our clearing implements. A blown high pressure hose would cause pump cavitation. Thousands in repairs and down time. We never lost one again after switching to their hydraulic oil. My wife had a Z28 Camaro we had for 7years. It ended up my son’s first car, later my toy. It had 5 oil changes of 20-50 Amsoil that’s it. My brother put a external oil system on his truck. He went over 50K miles on Amsoil.  Most of my trucks had two oil changes during the 90s-2000s. I admit you couldn’t do it on most modern engines. It’s not the oils fault.

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