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Is there a fuel filter on these trucks with the 6.2?


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2 hours ago, Anon12345 said:

I cant find any replacement fuel filters for the 21's with the 6.2. Did they do away with fuel filters or something?

Its in the fuel tank on the fuel pump (non-serviceable) as it wont clog it will backflush a little to clear filter when you shut the motor off.

Edited by Silverado4x4
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25 minutes ago, Silverado4x4 said:

Its in the fuel tank on the fuel pump (non-serviceable) as it wont clog it will backflush a little to clear filter when you shut the motor off.

 

Is there any x amount of miles you need to replace the fuel pump or service it or entirely non serviceable for life?

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you could add an inline filter if your fuel supply is questionable. I'm not sure the strainer in the tank will stop any water from entering the system

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4 hours ago, Anon12345 said:

I cant find any replacement fuel filters for the 21's with the 6.2. Did they do away with fuel filters or something?

 

 

There isn't.  GM hasn't had a serviceable fuel filter on gas trucks since 2003.  All there is in the tank is the non-replaceable strainer/sock that is part of the fuel pump assembly.

Edited by newdude
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22 minutes ago, newdude said:

 

 

There isn't.  GM hasn't had a serviceable fuel filter on gas trucks since 2003.  All there is in the tank is the non-replaceable strainer/sock that is part of the fuel pump assembly.

 

Hm. Is there anything concerning about the change over? I've never heard any complaints so im assuming its all good 

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Nope, they wouldn't have done it if there was a big problem. Fuel pump failures in my opinion have been far less since the release of the GMT-900's in 2007.

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20 hours ago, Anon12345 said:

 

Hm. Is there anything concerning about the change over? I've never heard any complaints so im assuming its all good 

 

 

I wouldn't say so.  Modern fuel systems and current fuels are definitely improved, and the pumps in the last 10-15 years tend to last quite some time.  If you are in a salt state, the top of the sending unit will rot and fail before the actual pump does.  

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This was dated about 1 0 yrs ago.....

 

 

Some customers have commented that they have been advised to replace their vehicle’s fuel filter periodically.

 

On many vehicles, the fuel filter is non-serviceable (see table). The filter is an integral part of the fuel pump module and fuel pressure regulator assembly. The filter can be serviced only by replacement of the fuel module assembly. This process requires the removal of the fuel tank (one to two hours of labor, depending on the model), plus several hundred dollars in unnecessary parts.

 

The vehicle owner’s manual outlines the periodic maintenance service required, under the Maintenance 1 and Maintenance 2 guidelines. Routine fuel filter replacement does not appear on either of these schedules.

 

In the future, due to the increased regulation of evaporative emissions, fuel systems utilizing a non-serviceable filter will become more common as new models are introduced.

 

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On 4/13/2022 at 5:49 PM, CamGTP said:

Nope, they wouldn't have done it if there was a big problem. Fuel pump failures in my opinion have been far less since the release of the GMT-900's in 2007.

 

The bigger issue is the pumps rusting away in northern climates. My 09 Tahoe developed a pinhole leak in the top where you could smell gas. When I replaced it, there wasn't much left to the line fittings on the top, they would not have made it much longer. The truck was 11 years old with 200+k miles at that point, so it served its time. 😉

Edited by fastk9dad
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I believe the tops of the pumps including the line connections are plastic now so they don't have that problem with the pump any more but you are correct the top of the fuel pump, the top of the fuel tank and the fuel lines/ brake lines all fall victims to corrosion in salt states. I think New York state must use more than anywhere, I have never seen vehicles rusted so badly as there even living less than a mile from the ocean and they use PLENTY of salt here the vehicles don't rust like there

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Oh that's good to know they moved to a plastic design. Even removing the lock ring with the proper tools was difficult there was so much rust there. Funny that you mentioned NY, that truck lived there for 10 years of its life before I moved to SC.

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