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Anyone tried to cut the active shutters?


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13 hours ago, Grumpy Bear said:

 

Are you saying the newest models of the Ecotec3 motors no longer have a mechanical water thermostat? 

 

 

They have a traditional thermostat.  2.7T has all the electronic gizmos including the water pump.  

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On 8/3/2022 at 9:16 AM, Grumpy Bear said:

 

Are you saying the newest models of the Ecotec3 motors no longer have a mechanical water thermostat? 

No, I was just saying the thermostat itself. Wish there was an easy way to keep it cooler. What I do not understand though is why it heats up as much at interstate speeds. The thermostat should be wide open and have plenty of free flowing air without the fan on. But yet even doing 70-75, it will fluctuate between 215-225.

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On 8/5/2022 at 8:55 AM, Byrds8 said:

No, I was just saying the thermostat itself. Wish there was an easy way to keep it cooler. What I do not understand though is why it heats up as much at interstate speeds. The thermostat should be wide open and have plenty of free flowing air without the fan on. But yet even doing 70-75, it will fluctuate between 215-225.

The dampers/shutters close at hwy speed for aerodynamics/better mpgs.Hence the higher temps. This is why I want to eliminate/modify my shutters.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Guess some people know more than the engineers. Just wanting to lower it because you think it is better from stock is an old way of thinking, vehicles don't operate in the same temp ranges anymore. What was hot 30 years ago is ideal today. They design an operating temperature range for a reason, and sometimes going much lower can have other implications. Oil viscosity changes with temperature, sensors, emissions equipment, all have specifics ideal ranges to operate. Certain metals expand and contract and particular temperatures and with the tight tolerances of todays vehicles that can matter. 

 

For example someone thought the trans temps at 220 was burning it up in these new trucks, that is fine and it doesn't get to dangerous levels until north of 250. With the oils they run they aren't breaking down either. Take it off if you want, but you aren't saving anything and may be cause some possible harm if lower running temps implicates something else (maybe some of emissions systems needs certain exhaust or engine temps to run properly long term). 

 

If you do, you can always just change over to Amsoil, that will fix any temperature irregularities or issues you have. Amsoil, the one stop fix all for anything and everything at a premium price. 

 

Tyler 

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On 9/9/2022 at 5:44 PM, Amcguy1970 said:

Guess some people know more than the engineers. Just wanting to lower it because you think it is better from stock is an old way of thinking, vehicles don't operate in the same temp ranges anymore. What was hot 30 years ago is ideal today. They design an operating temperature range for a reason, and sometimes going much lower can have other implications. Oil viscosity changes with temperature, sensors, emissions equipment, all have specifics ideal ranges to operate. Certain metals expand and contract and particular temperatures and with the tight tolerances of todays vehicles that can matter. 

 

For example someone thought the trans temps at 220 was burning it up in these new trucks, that is fine and it doesn't get to dangerous levels until north of 250. With the oils they run they aren't breaking down either. Take it off if you want, but you aren't saving anything and may be cause some possible harm if lower running temps implicates something else (maybe some of emissions systems needs certain exhaust or engine temps to run properly long term). 

 

If you do, you can always just change over to Amsoil, that will fix any temperature irregularities or issues you have. Amsoil, the one stop fix all for anything and everything at a premium price. 

 

Tyler 

 

This is quite true of today's engines. When the engines and transmissions are in a tighter temperature range, it is best for operation and efficiency. People taking the thermostat out of a car, ultimately makes the engine run hotter/colder and not as efficient or good for the engine. Same with the current crop of transmissions that have a thermostat to keep them in a particular range under driving conditions. 

 

None of it makes sense thinking of the old-school ways, but it's the way things are designed now and likely why longevity is much better these days from a mechanical perspective.

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