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new truck 1st OIL CHANGE 500 miles or less


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WearOut.jpg.5bb46a854f523774f5dc8d786b2265f0.jpg

 

This is a point of reference argument where no one will agree on A point of reference. Wear in a mechanical device doesn't care what anyone thinks. I just does what it does guided by universal law regardless of the ignorance or education of is observers. 

 

There is a reason a chart like this doesn't have scales for either axis. The height of the graphed line and it's length are dependent on the machines particulars of build and operation but the line exist regardless independently of those conditional sets. 

 

Does it matter? Oh yea. But will the owner 'realize' the fruitage of the seeds he sows? Most likely, he will not. Why?

 

Because along the X axis most people trade very early in the zone of "normal operation" and conclude from not playing the hand they dealt themselves that the cards they dealt didn't matter. The national percentage of powertrains making it to 100K, 200K and 300K prove this majority result. 

 

This is not unlike a child that plants a kernel of corn and because he isn't eating corn on the cob then next day concludes that all the things that a farmer does to reap a crop simply don't matter. Worse he demands that the famer is an ignorant sort and should not be listened to. 

 

You absolutely can do as you please. Has zero effect on my machines. Does not influence my decisions or my pocketbook and I'm way to old to be shamed into giving up on rational thought. 

 

The handful of owners that operate a vehicle well past 500K prove the majority wrong. Do what you've always done and you get what you've always got. 

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And there’s the rub. Most people on here say I’ll never use a self serve car wash. I do I belong to a club. Every day when I go on my walk I can stop by wash and vacuum my truck. Do I see any scratches? No my 66 year old eyes see a clean truck. The hand washing crowd trucks looks good on the weekends mine looks good everyday. Will changing the oil early and more often make my ride last 300K or longer? How many really want a ride that long. Can you patch your underwear for longevity? Probably. Both would be about as comfortable to use. 

Edited by KARNUT
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1 hour ago, diyer2 said:

This is Grumpy figuring tomorrow's breakfast.😀

 

4 hours ago, BIGDOGx said:

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😀jk

 

And here is a live shot of Grumpy figuring all this #@#@ out!🤣

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Yeah, it is thin, for sure. I remember changing the oil in a minivan the wife drove several years ago and it was 0W-20, also. I was like this is just Crisco vegetable oil! Peanut oil for frying a turkey is thicker than that! LOL!

 

Amazing how engine and oil technology has evolved over the years to what we have today. Not all are perfect, but the advancements made are pretty impressive. Enjoy your new truck, FJB.

Edited by ShotgunZ71
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On the theme of early oil change on a new vehicle.. is there such a thing of "breaking-in" on the speed limit before taking it to higher speeds?  Not talking about racing or WOT just normal driving.

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I wonder if anyone has sent their new oil in for evaluation. That would end speculation and prove the manufacturers are full of it. I've only had one engine failure in 40 plus years. Not from oil. The new engines with cylinder deactivation are more sensitive to clean oil. Not that I would ever buy one, never! It would be good to know.

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6 hours ago, RedLT said:

On the theme of early oil change on a new vehicle.. is there such a thing of "breaking-in" on the speed limit before taking it to higher speeds?  Not talking about racing or WOT just normal driving.

 

I say "no", there's no such thing. Normal driving is perfectly fine. I drive my vehicles normal from the test drive to the time I trade or sell. I go above 55, sometimes even have to brake hard. No issues to date. Yes, even a few heavy-foot moments with less than 1000 miles have occurred. Don't do these things repetitively and all should be good. Not going to purchase a vehicle and ****-foot the test drive or the first 500 or 1000 miles. That's just crazy. Don't flog it continuously, but don't baby it either.

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9 hours ago, RedLT said:

On the theme of early oil change on a new vehicle.. is there such a thing of "breaking-in" on the speed limit before taking it to higher speeds?  Not talking about racing or WOT just normal driving.

 

I'm wasting my time on this but it's my time to waste, right? 

 

Break in is about HEAT management. Everything expands when heated and when things expand clearance diminishes. I'll keep this simple looking at only piston to cylinder clearance. When a motor is built it has a target 'cold' clearance that is published. But it also has a targeted hot clearance that is not published. No matter what the cold clearance is the hot clearance is the same. Trust me on that or don't. Makes no difference to me. How much cold clearance is called out depend on alloys and construction and expected operating conditions. All things that concern heat and heat is the variable of expansion. All meant to reach a prescribed hot clearance. This clearance is the number that supports the rings and limits gas exchange. Blow by. 

 

When a motor is "new' the finish is rougher that it will be after 'break in' and so during break in it runs hotter than it will once broke in. Rougher surfaces run hotter. Speed and load determine the amount of 'sensible heat' generated and loading it too much or running it to fast heats a part with less clearance NOW than it will have THEN and to that point enough heat is generated to 'hot weld' asperities. Yes that increases clearance if you are fortunate and if not it will seize the piston in the cylinder and destroy it. After about a hundred plus years of consumers 'knowing more than designers" they almost have this stupid proof. Almost. Few motors lock up anymore BUT what does happen is you end product life is SHORTENED by the amount of clearance your ignorance demanded.

 

Things wear in, then they wear, then eventually, they wear out. What is worn out? Too much clearance or uneven wear. 

 

Your book talks from both sides of the page. Elaborate break in is not required BUT keeping it within the book boundaries can add significant life to the assembly. Believe, don't believe. The universe could care less. 

 

WearOut.jpg.5bb46a854f523774f5dc8d786b2265f0.jpg

 

Good break in moves you to the left in the area of "Normal Operation". Ignoring it moves you to the right. 

 

Edited by Grumpy Bear
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You didn't waste your time. After 40 years in automotive engineering I just learned something new.  Your explanation should be published in the owners manual.  As a guy who is always asking "why?", I appreciate the reason why a break-in period is needed. I knew that mating parts needed to be cycled to be worn in together but I didn't know that the (excessive) heat played such a major role.  I thought it was excessive stress, but then what causes the excessive stress? The heat!

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