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Are Spare Tires the Same for 2020 1500 AT4 and 2022 1500 Denali?


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Trying to troubleshoot vibration on freeway and a judder/deflection over bumps on my 2022 1500 Denali with 22" wheels. I've been told it might be just the way  22" ride, or the way these tires ride, and I don't want to spend a bunch of money only to find out the problem lies elsewhere. A friend has a 2020 1500 AT4 who no longer has stock wheels that will fit my stock truck. Are our spares the same so I can can I put his spare and my spare on my truck just to see if behavior changes? 

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21 hours ago, MrLeadFoot said:

Trying to troubleshoot vibration on freeway and a judder/deflection over bumps on my 2022 1500 Denali with 22" wheels. I've been told it might be just the way  22" ride, or the way these tires ride, and I don't want to spend a bunch of money only to find out the problem lies elsewhere. A friend has a 2020 1500 AT4 who no longer has stock wheels that will fit my stock truck. Are our spares the same so I can can I put his spare and my spare on my truck just to see if behavior changes? 

I would say yes as there would be no reason to have different size spares for these trucks. My 20 SLT with 20" has a regular stock tire as a spare.

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12 hours ago, MrLeadFoot said:

Oh, then they must not all be the same. Mine has a 17" rim.

Mine has a 17" rim as well if you want to account for rim size. I meant the tires are basically a stock setup. As stated though it's the overall diameter of the tire that's what's important. The spare they use is only temporary anyway. Enough to get you home or to a repair shop.

 

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On 2/8/2023 at 10:26 AM, MrLeadFoot said:

Trying to troubleshoot vibration on freeway and a judder/deflection over bumps on my 2022 1500 Denali with 22" wheels. I've been told it might be just the way  22" ride, or the way these tires ride, and I don't want to spend a bunch of money only to find out the problem lies elsewhere. A friend has a 2020 1500 AT4 who no longer has stock wheels that will fit my stock truck. Are our spares the same so I can can I put his spare and my spare on my truck just to see if behavior changes? 

I thought you got this issue resolved. They roadforce balanced the Bridgestones and found one bad? Many on here advised you ditch the Alenzas for Michelin Defenders. You did the same on a previously owned Suburban. Maybe you should bite the bullet and get the Michelins. I never had an issue with my 22 inch Alenzas myself, but they did get sketchy around 30000 miles. 

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On 2/8/2023 at 10:26 AM, MrLeadFoot said:

Trying to troubleshoot vibration on freeway and a judder/deflection over bumps on my 2022 1500 Denali with 22" wheels. I've been told it might be just the way  22" ride, or the way these tires ride, and I don't want to spend a bunch of money only to find out the problem lies elsewhere. A friend has a 2020 1500 AT4 who no longer has stock wheels that will fit my stock truck. Are our spares the same so I can can I put his spare and my spare on my truck just to see if behavior changes? 

 

 

Depends.  They all use a 17 inch size wheel for the spare, but the spare tire size varies by the OE size on the truck.  

 

The AT4 would have had to have 275/60R20 the spare would have been a 255/80R17 (33.1") which would be the same size spare as your truck with 22s.  

 

They use 3 spare sizes.  17 inch wheel with 255/70R17 (31") uses that same size for spare. 

 

The 265/70R17, 265/65R18 and 275/65R18 equipped trucks use a 265/70R17 spare (31.5-32 inch tire range). 

 

Trucks with 275/60R20 and 275/50R22 use 255/80R17 spare (33 inch tire).  

Edited by newdude
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9 hours ago, 2016 Sierra Owner said:

The spare they use is only temporary anyway. Enough to get you home or to a repair shop.

 

 

 

Temporary it may be but they are full size spares and of equal speed and load rating so they can be used at the same speeds as the tires on the truck unlike a traditional temporary spare.  

 

Edited by newdude
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43 minutes ago, newdude said:

 

 

Temporary it may be but they are full size spares and of equal speed and load rating so they can be used at the same speeds as the tires on the truck unlike a traditional temporary spare.  

 

True but the tire is even marked temporary. At least mine was. Not like the old days when the spare was an actual (non temp) tire.

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9 hours ago, smit303 said:

I thought you got this issue resolved. They roadforce balanced the Bridgestones and found one bad? Many on here advised you ditch the Alenzas for Michelin Defenders. You did the same on a previously owned Suburban. Maybe you should bite the bullet and get the Michelins. I never had an issue with my 22 inch Alenzas myself, but they did get sketchy around 30000 miles. 

I thought so, too. The new dealership I took it to wanted to check ALL the tires, and found TWO bad tires this time. Installed new tires, roadforced them all and now I'm back to square one, no resolution. I actually feel like it was better before the two nes tires, but at this point I can no longer be sure, because now I've had 8 rims and 12 tires on the truck over this issue!

 

Not sure I want to spend $1200 only to find out that's not the problem. Working on getting them to swap them with 20s or 18s, both of which have different model tires, just to see if it is something to do with wheels. If the ride doesn't change, we know it's something else.  If it does change for the better, maybe GM would be willing to step me "down" to 20s or 18s to resolve this. That's why I was wanting to try running spares because that's only way I can see what different wheels and tires does. I can't see any other way to TRY other wheels. I'd hate to lemon-law this thing over wheels/tires, but I will if that's my only recourse. Hope that makes sense. 

Edited by MrLeadFoot
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2 hours ago, newdude said:

 

 

Depends.  They all use a 17 inch size wheel for the spare, but the spare tire size varies by the OE size on the truck.  

 

The AT4 would have had to have 275/60R20 the spare would have been a 255/80R17 (33.1") which would be the same size spare as your truck with 22s.  

 

They use 3 spare sizes.  17 inch wheel with 255/70R17 (31") uses that same size for spare. 

 

The 265/70R17, 265/65R18 and 275/65R18 equipped trucks use a 265/70R17 spare (31.5-32 inch tire range). 

 

Trucks with 275/60R20 and 275/50R22 use 255/80R17 spare (33 inch tire).  

Thanks for those details. It sucks that I have to try to find someone with the same diameter spare so I can try this just to see if this changes the issues I'm having. I'm better off trying to find someone willing to let me try their 20" or 18" wheels, which is probably a tough ask of anyone. If the dealership or GM won't help facilitate this, sounds like my only recourse is going to be an attorney to get this thing bought back. Bummer, as I like everything else about this truck.

Edited by MrLeadFoot
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Come on over to my house, I have 4 full size spare tires that we were going to use for burnouts.  Same size and brand.

 

At what speed does the vibration begin and end?  Bouncing over bumps is normal when the truck is unloaded.  These trucks are built to tow and ride better with a load on, they are designed that way.

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1 hour ago, swathdiver said:

Come on over to my house, I have 4 full size spare tires that we were going to use for burnouts.  Same size and brand.

 

At what speed does the vibration begin and end?  Bouncing over bumps is normal when the truck is unloaded.  These trucks are built to tow and ride better with a load on, they are designed that way.

I wish I was still in Vero Beach, as I would take you up on your offer, but alas, I'm in Northern California.

 

Vibration is easily felt at ANY freeway speed from onramp to 90mph. Over bumps, I expect the truck to feel the bumps, but my truck judders, as if the shocks don't rebound properly and feels like the wheels are wobbling over the bumps, and that creates more of a shaking vibration, which on long drives eventually jostles your innards.

 

I thought the same thing you mentioned about being unloaded, so I put 240 lbs. of sandbags in the bed up against the cab, and all that did was weigh down the rear and make the juderring more pronounced. I reduced the weight to 180 lbs., then 120 lbs., but the issues never went away. When I tow my 4000 lbs. bass boat, forget about it. The vibration is enhanced and the ride is even rougher over bumps.

 

FWIW, the Trail Boss I test drove before buying (no AT4s in my area at the time) drove noticably smoother even on bumpy city streets than my Denali does (which was delivered to me). You would think a Denali with adaptive ride control would ride way smoother than the AT4/Trail Boss, but it's the other way around with this Denali. I bet no one else would say an AT4/Trail Boss rides way smoother than a Denali like I'm saying.

Edited by MrLeadFoot
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Ok, I get it, I don't think it's the tires or wheels then.  Could it be an out of round hub or axle shaft?  Maybe.  More than likely is that the suspension needs to be re-calibrated.  It's a Z95 Magneride right?  I read a few times that the last generation would often need re-calibrating to stay in tune.  This can only be done with the dealer level bi-directional scan tool or a Snap-On scanner.

 

The jostling over bumps and train tracks, especially when you feel it up front in the steering wheel is how the alignment is set.  I think you need more caster.

 

https://autoquarterly.com/wheel-alignment-what-is-caster/

 

Reduced Sensitivity to Road Conditions


It might seem like a bad thing to have to turn the steering wheel more to get the car to turn, but the truth is that it’s actually a lot more comfortable. Roads are not perfectly smooth. They have a lot of bumps and imperfections, and each imperfection knocks the wheel around. If the steering input was very sensitive, that would translate directly to your wrists and jerk the steering wheel around.

 

Instead, with a positive caster, the steering system can absorb all those road imperfections without moving the car around. On a long stretch of highway, that means you don’t have to make constant corrections to stay on the road.

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