Jump to content

Seat hinge cutting leather


Recommended Posts

The metal hinge for my drivers seat back is cutting the leather on the seat cushion. I'm a tall guy so I have the seat cushion as low as it will go and the tilting/hinge mechanism for the seat back is rubbing the leather, thus cutting it. I can already see the fabric backing in one area where the leather has been worn away. I'll get pics later today but was wondering if anyone had seen this on their ride, cause this just seems like an oversight by the interior folks at GM. I'm going to fashion up some sort of cover to go over the hinge pieces so they won't rub the leather anymore. The truck is an '05 Silverado Crew Cab and has 8k miles and I've had it for nine months.

 

Thanks in advance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My (widest) back seat in my CrewCab had a similar problem. Apparently they didn't bother to deburr the metal frame when they made it. Mine split about 6" of the vinyl on the lower RH side of the seat base. I didn't notice it until I folded the seat base forward and the back down. I nearly sliced my finger on it! Dealer replaced it under warranty, they put a whole new cover on it.

 

They brought in a new frame and cover, but reused the old frame after I asked them to draw file that friken' sharp edge off it. I wonder how many other sharp edges I'm going to find...

 

I'm not sure where yours is wearing, but you might want to look for any sharp edges and file them down rounded.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blame it on the cost-cutters. If you check closely you will find sharp edges on a lot of the metal parts. If it saves a quarter a part the OEM's will choose to eliminate the deburr operation, especially if it's considered in an area the customer will not notice.

 

I'm a Quality Engineer for a seat supplier so I am very familiar with the issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blame it on the cost-cutters. If you check closely you will find sharp edges on a lot of the metal parts. If it saves a quarter a part the OEM's will choose to eliminate the deburr operation, especially if it's considered in an area the customer will not notice.

 

I'm a Quality Engineer for a seat supplier so I am very familiar with the issue.

 

 

 

 

Wasn't it your job then to tell them that was bad quality?

 

Step into my office.

Why?

Cause you're f**king fired!

:chevy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suspect that the "bad quality" isn't negotiable any more. It's meet-my-price or you lose the contract. Do what you have to.

 

Does anybody remember the days when GM was actually trying to match Japenese quality. Haven't heard that much lately. Ever look at the gaps between the body panels on a Saturn Vue? They're startlingly huge!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blame it on the cost-cutters. If you check closely you will find sharp edges on a lot of the metal parts. If it saves a quarter a part the OEM's will choose to eliminate the deburr operation, especially if it's considered in an area the customer will not notice.

 

I'm a Quality Engineer for a seat supplier so I am very familiar with the issue.

 

 

 

 

Wasn't it your job then to tell them that was bad quality?

 

Step into my office.

Why?

Cause you're f**king fired!

:chevy:

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's all about the short-term, almighty dollar and the profits for this month. Unfortunately that's the way it is with U.S. big business these days. It frustrates me to no end to see the things that are allowed to go on. mmmikkke has it right; if you don't meet or beat the price you lose the contract.

 

Just look at the tier one suppliers that have gone Chapter 11 - Collins & Aikman, Meridian Automotive Systems, Tower Automotive Inc, and Intermet Corp to name a few - and it's easy to see that the OEM's don't care about their suppliers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.