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Nemesisdawn

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About Nemesisdawn

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    Enthusiast

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  • Drives
    '03 GMC Sierra 1500 4X4
  1. Update... Changing the temp sensor to the original GM didn't do anything. Here are pictures of the custom harness placed in the fuse box that's made for the fans. Does anything appear out of the ordinary? If two of the wires' places are switched, would they cause this problem?
  2. I already don't like the idea of installing a different sensor just because it is "supposedly" better. I will try to install a GM sensor and come back here with how it went.
  3. Yeah I think so. It was installed in the fuse box with the wires.
  4. He converted the fans from a belt driven one to electrical. He made a custom wiring harness and installed a new Mercedes temp sensor because he was told it worked better in a hot climate. The problem he has now is that the radiator fan works in reverse. When I put the key on the "On" position and start the engine cold the fan is still on. And when the engine reaches the operating temp, which is about half way of the gauge, the fan turns off. Basically the radiator fan works in the reverse order of what it should. That's the problem.
  5. I did try the car myself. When I turn the switch to "On", the radiator fan turns on. Does that mean it's wired in a wrong way? He did tell me that the temp sensor on the car is for a Mercedes that's supposedly works better in hotter climate.
  6. Hello. My brother seems to have a bit of a weird problem. He recently swapped his belt driven fans for an electrical ones. He did all the wirings and changed the temp Sensor. Although the AC fan works fine, It seems that the radiator fan turns on instantly when the engine is cold, but when the engine reaches the operating temperature it turns off and stays off. What could cause this? Did he flip a wire somewhere?
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